Sri Lanka Navy Assists in Repatriation of 22 Indian Fishermen

first_imgSri Lanka Navy assisted in the repatriation of 22 Indian fishermen on 08th November 2013.The fishermen were handed over to the Indian Coast Guard Ship “Raj Kamal” at the International Maritime Boundary Line off Thalaimannar by Sri Lanka Navy Ship “Udara” attached to the Northern Naval Command and two SLN Inshore Patrol Crafts attached to North Central Naval Command also assisted the mission.[mappress]Press Release, November 12, 2013; Image: Sri Lanka Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today Sri Lanka Navy Assists in Repatriation of 22 Indian Fishermen November 12, 2013 Sri Lanka Navy Assists in Repatriation of 22 Indian Fishermen Share this articlelast_img

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Mayor Proposes New Five-Year Capital Plan for Ocean City Upgrades

first_imgOcean City Public Safety Building By Donald WittkowskiMayor Jay Gillian proposed a $112.2 million, five-year capital plan Tuesday night that would pack a series of big-ticket projects in 2017, including an overhaul of the antiquated public safety building and the continuation of upgrades to the tourist-friendly Boardwalk.Calling it a “bold” blueprint for the future, Gillian said the plan spreads out improvements across the entire town and addresses Ocean City’s critical infrastructure needs after years of neglect.“The five-year capital plan you’re about to see dedicates more than $112 million to fixing up everything in the city – from flooded streets to shallow lagoons, from tip to tip, from Boardwalk to bay,” Gillian said in prepared remarks while unveiling his proposal to City Council during a budget workshop.The mayor told Council that his plan reflects what he has heard over and over from local residents – that they want action and are “tired of waiting for somebody else to kick the can down the road.”“They want their streets to drain. They want to be able to take their boats out. They want open space. They want to enjoy the beaches and Boardwalk and downtown. They want Ocean City’s exceptional services,” Gillian said.The plan runs from 2017 to 2021 and represents a 14 percent increase over the five-year, $98.5 million capital program that Gillian proposed in 2016.“It’s a lot of money,” Gillian said. “And I don’t make this recommendation lightly. But I’m confident that it’s a responsible plan.”Mayor Jay Gillian, second from left, and members of his senior management team unveiled the $112.2 million, five-year capital plan.There is a financial cost for local property owners. On average, the capital plan would increase the local property tax rate by about a penny per year. On a home assessed at $500,000, that would mean about an extra $50 annually in local taxes, or $250 over five years.“It’s going to come with a price, so we want to be honest with the taxpayers,” said Frank Donato, the city’s chief financial officer.The biggest tax hit would be felt this year, because the plan proposes spending more money – nearly $52 million – in 2017 than in any other year.“Much of the funding is front-loaded for 2017, and taxpayers may feel the greatest impact this year,” Gillian said. “Once we get through some of the major projects in the next year, the plan calls for trimming back – without losing a focus on roads and drainage.”Donato explained that the tax rate would increase by about 2.5 cents to 3 cents in 2017, reflecting an extra $125 to $150 in property taxes on a home assessed at $500,000.The capital plan is in response to local property owners who have urged the city to complete long-neglected projects in virtually every part of town, the mayor said.“I hear from residents every day, and this plan delivers what they ask for,” he said.City Council will scrutinize the plan and is scheduled to take a vote on Feb. 9.City bonds backed by local tax revenue would finance a large portion of the capital plan. The plan also would depend on grants and a variety of state and federal funding.Major improvements proposed for 2017 include a series of road and drainage projects in every ward of the city. Altogether, $10.4 million worth of paving and drainage upgrades are planned in 2017 to help reduce flooding, particularly during coastal storms.Gillian said Monday’s powerful nor’easter, which unleashed widespread flooding along the Jersey Shore, illustrated the importance of Ocean City’s plan to improve its roadway and drainage network.Continuing what he started in 2016, Gillian is once again placing a big emphasis on dredging projects to clear out the city’s sediment-choked lagoons and channels along the back bays. After setting aside $10 million for dredging projects in 2016, Gillian will follow up with $7.5 million for similar work this year.Boat owners have repeatedly complained that they are often trapped at their docks or have to wait until high tide to navigate through the shallow lagoons and channels.Similar to last year, the Boardwalk will be another major focus of the capital plan in 2017. In all, the Boardwalk would receive about $6.6 million in upgrades, including $4.7 million for its reconstruction from 10th to 12th streets. The Boardwalk’s reconstruction between 10th and 12th streets represents the final phase of a multiyear project to replace aging wooden planks with new timber from Fifth Street to 12th Street.The single-most expensive project proposed in the capital plan for 2017 is a $17.5 million renovation and expansion of the public safety building, a century-old structure that houses the police department and municipal court. Gillian originally proposed tearing down the building and replacing it with an all-new public safety complex, but now considers the renovation plan the most cost-efficient option.“This plan preserves a historic building while stabilizing and updating it,” the mayor said. “It does not eliminate parking from any other area of town. It does not require the purchase of any land or impact any other part of Ocean City. It does not entail any interruption of services during construction. And, again, it’s the most responsible way to do it.”The boardwalk improvements will continue under the new capital plan.One local resident, Michael Hinchman, a former president of the government watchdog group Fairness In Taxes, questioned the renovation cost of the public safety building. He argued that the building really only needs a new roof and a heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system.“I can’t get my head around that,” Hinchman said of the estimated $17.5 million price tag.The first floor of the old building will be removed to comply with flood requirements by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Gillian noted that much of the project’s construction cost will come from stabilizing the building once the first floor is removed.Meanwhile, the capital plan will be scrutinized by Council for possible changes before it takes a vote, which is scheduled for Feb. 9.Although Council members generally seemed receptive to the plan during Tuesday’s budget workshop, there were some questions about the impact on local taxes and whether more road projects could be done.Councilman Michael DeVlieger, who represents the First Ward, urged Gillian to consider building more road projects for the north end of town and getting them in the pipeline sooner. DeVlieger said he receives more complaints from local residents about the roads than any other issue.“I’d like to find a way of doing more,” DeVlieger said of the possibility of adding road projects in the First Ward.Councilman Keith Hartzell asked Donato a series of questions about the capital plan’s tax implications. Donato told him that the increase in the local tax rate would average about a penny per year. Hartzell said he believed residents would ultimately support a tax increase to fund capital improvements.However, Hartzell stressed that the public should not think the governing body will simply write “a blank check” to finance the capital plan. He said the proposal will be closely reviewed by Council before it takes a vote.“I guess this will take a leap (of faith) from us and a lot of questions from taxpayers,” Hartzell said.last_img read more

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Two arrested in St. Joseph County drug bust

first_img Facebook Pinterest Google+ Twitter Google+ Pinterest (Photo Supplied/St. Joseph County Sheriff’s Office) (Photo Supplied/St. Joseph County Sheriff’s Office)Two people were arrested in St. Joseph County Wednesday after a traffic stop lead to a drug bust.It began just before 2 a.m. when an officer spotted a suspicious vehicle driving slowly through a hotel parking lot. The officer conducted a traffic stop on the 2003 Chevy Blazer and discovered the driver did not have a valid driver’s license.Jason Cochran, 43 of South Bend, was also wanted on a 2 County Felony Warrant out of Cass County, Michigan.(Photo Supplied/St. Joseph County Sheriff’s Office)The officer searched Cochran’s vehicle and found $1,525 in cash, .75 pounds of methamphetamine, multiple paraphernalia items including two baby bottles made into meth pipes, and multiple driver’s licenses, credit cards and social security cards belonging to various people.Cochran was arrested on preliminary charges of Possession of a Controlled Substance with Intent to Deal and Operating a Motor Vehicle Without Ever Obtaining a License.The vehicle’s passenger, Stephanie Fugate, 43 of Mishawaka, was also arrested on a preliminary charge of Possession of Paraphernalia. WhatsApp TAGSarrestedbustdrugIndianaJason CochranmethmethamphetamineSt. Joseph CountyStephanie Fugate center_img Facebook WhatsApp By Brooklyne Beatty – January 28, 2021 3 594 Twitter Two arrested in St. Joseph County drug bust IndianaLocalNews Previous articlePlymouth man, 28, arrested on multiple child pornography countsNext articleInmate captured after escaping into hospital ceiling Wednesday Brooklyne Beattylast_img read more

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Grosz leaving Radcliffe deanship

first_imgGrosz came to Harvard in 1986 as the Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science. She is an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2009, she received the Allen Newell Award from the Association for Computing Machinery and the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence for “fundamental contributions to research in natural language processing and in multi-agent systems, for her leadership in the field of artificial intelligence, and for her role in the establishment and leadership of interdisciplinary institutions.”Grosz received her undergraduate degree in mathematics from Cornell, and holds a master’s and doctorate in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley. Dean Barbara J. Grosz of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study announced today (April 14) that she will step down at the end of this academic year. Grosz, who is also Higgins Professor of Natural Sciences at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, will spend next year at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University before returning to the Harvard faculty.“After a decade at the institute, as I consider the next decade of my academic career and the challenges that have the potential to offer the greatest reward and make the most significant difference, I want to return to the research and teaching that first brought me to Harvard 25 years ago,” Grosz said in a message sent to the Radcliffe community this morning.“The Radcliffe Institute is close to my heart, and I am deeply grateful for Barbara’s strong leadership,” said President Drew Faust. “Barbara has a talent for nurturing intellectual communities — forging new interdisciplinary collaborations, bringing together scholars from Harvard’s Schools and around the world. Thanks to her wisdom and guidance, Radcliffe plays an important generative role in the intellectual life of the University.”Grosz has served as interim dean, and then dean, of the institute since July 2007. As dean, Grosz designed and developed the Academic Ventures program. Led by six faculty members from several Harvard Schools, Academic Ventures offers collaborative programming designed to engage faculty, students, and the wider community. Its events have included conferences and symposia about gender in the developing world, the emergence of patterns in the natural world, and the history and future of the book. Workshops and seminars at the institute have supported cross-cutting initiatives on an array of issues, including a national digital library, cybersecurity, and global women’s health leadership.As dean, Grosz worked to deepen ties among the Radcliffe Fellowship Program, the Schlesinger Library, and Academic Ventures. Closer relationships have helped to enhance the institute as a setting for boundary-crossing research. “These synergies have made the whole greater than the sum of its parts,” said Grosz.From 2001 to 2007, Grosz served as the institute’s dean of science, and is credited with attracting leading scientists to the Radcliffe Fellowship Program. Grosz also encouraged joint fellowship applications from small groups of scholars, known as research clusters, which have supported interdisciplinary scholarship on issues ranging from biography to bioengineering.As a researcher, Grosz is widely known for her work in artificial intelligence, and was one of the earliest and most influential contributors to the computational modeling of discourse and to collaborative multi-agent systems. This scholarship draws from a variety of fields, including linguistics, psychology, economics, and philosophy.“These are exciting times for a computer scientist,” Grosz said. “Traditional disciplinary boundaries are breaking down, and the broad intellectual experience that I have enjoyed during my decade at Radcliffe will inform my work for years to come.” Faust plans to move quickly to appoint an interim dean to begin service on July 1.last_img read more

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Alumnus orates original cross-cultural poems

first_imgPoet Lauro Vazquez, a graduate of the Notre Dame Creative Writing Program and recipient of the Sparks Prize, gave a poetry reading at the Notre Dame Bookstore on Wednesday night.A native of Northern California, Vazquez is also coeditor of “Letras Latinas,” a blog sponsored by the Institute for Latino Studies and recipient of a fellowship from Cantomundo, as well as a guest speaker at several universities, such as Iowa State University.Vazquez read several of his poems, including “Ode to a Pretzel,” “Homophobes,” “The Door,” “Fables” and many others.Vazquez said his poetry presents a combination of obscure and singular events, such as former President George Bush choking on a pretzel or a scientist attempting to save carrier pigeons from extinction, with themes of revolution, mysticism and U.S.-Latino relations.“Poetry is like a playground,” Vazquez said. “Language to me is very playful and experimental.”Vazquez said his upbringing in both Mexico and California has been a major influence on his writing. Many of his poems deal with Hispanic culture and its influence in California.Revolutionaries who have impacted both the U.S. and Latin America, such as Vasco Nunez de Balboa, Carlos Sandino and Irish immigrant workers in the U.S. appear often in his poetry, Vazquez said.“When I went to college, I heard about these revolutionaries. They gave me an understanding of the world,” Vazquez said. “I’m an artist. The best I can do is reflect on their contributions.”Vazquez said the theme of revolution and the glory of revolutionaries across history connects easily with younger generations.“Young people, by nature, don’t accept injustice and tend to gravitate towards people who have upset the status quo,” Vazquez said.Vazquez said his experiences at Notre Dame helped shape his writing and his world views.“Notre Dame really helped me develop the aesthetic in terms of the artistry behind my poems as well as a broader understanding of history,” Vazquez said. “[It] helped connect me to a network of poets and I belong to a community that nourishes my writing.”Creative writing program director Orlando Menes said Velazquez has continued to grow as a writer after graduating from the program.“Lauro has made tremendous strides as a poet,” Menes said. “He grounds his cross-cultural poems in his sophisticated fusion of myth and history.”Tags: Lauro Vazquez, Legends, Notre Dame Creative Writing Program, Poetry Readinglast_img read more

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Quick Hits: N.C. Senate Planning to Eliminate Conservation Funds + Federal Clean Water Rules Weakened

first_imgNine environmental groups and 16 South Carolina cities will sue over offshore drilling testsNine conservation groups and 16 coastal cities in South Carolina are suing the Trump administration to stop leases to explore for offshore natural gas and oil. The lawsuits claim that the leases violate the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act, which prohibits harassing or killing animals such as whales or dolphins. When companies explore for natural gas and oil offshore they use a process called seismic blast testing that involves detonating sound blasts from airguns every 16 seconds. The blasts can deafen, injure and scatter marine animals and take place over miles of ocean for months at a time. Five companies want to search for natural gas and oil off of South Carolina’s coast. Offshore natural gas and oil exploration has been met with massive opposition from South Carolina’s communities, leaders and politicians. Project Funding for North Carolina’s Conservation Organizations Faces EliminationA quick-moving State Senate Bill is threatening to eliminate two sources of funding for conservation organizations in North Carolina: the Clean Water Management Trust Fund (CWMTF) and the Parks and Recreation Trust Fund (PARTF). North Carolina Senate Bill 821 seeks to repeal statutes creating six boards and commissions, including those of CWMTF and PARTF, “for which the appointed structures were ruled unconstitutional pursuant to McCrory v. Berger and Cooper v. Berger.” According to a statement released by Salisbury, North Carolina’s Three Rivers Land “Senate Bill 821 does not fix the six boards and commissions named in this bill. It instead jeopardizes project funding for conservation organizations across North Carolina. Luckily, House Bill 1120 will provide an immediate fix to these boards, without endangering CWMTF and PARTF.” Conservation organizations are urging North Carolina residents to contact their representatives and ask them to oppose Senate Bill 821 and support House Bill 1120. The Trump administration unveils a plan that weakens federal clean water rulesOn Tuesday the Trump administration released a proposal weakening federal water protections for millions of acres of streams, wetlands, and waterways that could affect drinking water for more than one-third of Americans. The proposal dramatically restricts which bodies of water are protected under the 1972 Clean Water Act regulations. A 2015 Obama rule expanded the definition to include 2 million additional acres of streams and 20 million more acres of wetlands. The new proposal will limit Clean Water Act regulations to major waterways, their tributaries, and adjacent wetland and exempt seasonal streams and other wetlands. The proposal also replaces a Bush-era rule that subjected some of those streams to regulations if they were connected to navigable waters. The proposal is now open to 60 days of public comment.last_img read more

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Bournemouth’s £250m retail scheme opens

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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COVID-19: Nearly 78,000 police to guard transition to Indonesia’s ‘new normal’

first_imgThe National Police have deployed 77,897 officers across the nation to guard the transition to the government’s so-called new normal phase, during which all citizens are required to abide by the COVID-19 health protocols to prevent wider spread of the disease.Police officers have been deployed to areas across all four levels of the government’s zoning system based on local infection rates, from the zero-risk green zones to the high-risk red zones, said National Police spokesman Sr. Comr. Awi Setiyono.“We have deployed 7,550 personnel to green zones, 8,981 personnel to yellow zones, 35,830 personnel to orange zones and 25,536 personnel to red zones,” he said on Tuesday, as quoted by tempo.co.According to the COVID-19 national task force’s June 21 data, the country currently has 57 areas categorized as red zones. Among these, East Java – the new epicenter of the national outbreak since June 26 – has the highest number of local red zones, comprising 13 cities and regencies.Meanwhile, 157 cities and regencies are now categorized as orange zones with moderate risk of COVID-19 transmission, and 188 regions are yellow zones with low transmission risk.Read also: Major regions still classified as red zones despite claims of improvementThe remaining 112 areas are green zones that have been declared either free of the virus or have not recorded any new cases in the past four weeks, with a 100 percent recovery rate.The nationwide deployment follows National Police chief Gen. Idham Azis’ decision last week to revoke the edict banning mass gatherings issued on March 19. Although the ban has been lifted, the National Police said that it would continue in an assisting capacity to ensure public discipline and compliance with the COVID-19 protocols during the new normal phase.“We will continue to support multisectoral cooperation in controlling the pandemic and disseminating [the health protocols] to the public,” Awi said.President Joko Widodo earlier stressed the role of the National Police and the Indonesian Military in guarding crowded places in preparation for the new normal “to make sure [that] society continues to abide by the health protocols”.According to published government data, Indonesia has 55,092 confirmed cases to date, with 2,805 deaths and 23,800 recovered cases. (trn)Topics :last_img read more

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PFZW to review Israeli divestment after allegations of pro-Palestinian bias [updated]

first_imgPFZW, the €137bn pension fund for the Dutch healthcare industry, will conduct a “very extensive” review of its recent divestment from five Israeli banks, according to its director, Peter Borgdorff.The pension fund has faced widespread criticism for the controversial decision, including allegations of pro-Palestinian bias. In early January, PGGM – the manager responsible for PFZW’s assets – announced that it planned to divest from the banks over their involvement in the financing of Israeli settlements in the “occupied Palestinian territories”.PGGM spokesman Maurice Wilbrink confirmed that the manager initiated its engagement with the banks, a process that led to their divestment, specifically at PFZW’s behest. The divestment has proved a highly contentious one, sparking demonstrations outsides PGGM’s offices, while the Israeli government summoned the Dutch ambassador to protest the move. In the fallout following the decision to divest from the banks, it came to light that Gert van Dijk, chairman of the PGGM council, was also a member of pro-Palestinian organisation ICCO.Further, Cees Flinterman, who is a member of PFZW’s ethical board, is also a board member of The Rights Forum, as well as a member of the Support Committee of the Russell Tribunal on Palestine, organisations that have been accused of having an anti-Israel agenda.Since then, Borgdorff has confirmed in his blog that pro-Palestinian organisations Cordaid, ICCO, IKV PaxChristi, Oxfam Novib, Watershed Working Group and the Dutch Palestine Komite, among others, had been actively lobbying the pension fund for “several years”, and that it incidentally provided pension funds to “some of them”. IPE understands that PFZW was lobbied by pro-Palestinian NGOs only.Meanwhile, ABP, Europe’s largest pension fund, announced in early February that it would not be following PGGM’s example, and that it disagreed with the manager’s assessment that the banks had acted in breach of “international law”.In a statement, it concluded that the Israeli banks in which it invests had done nothing to violate the UN Global Compact, or give cause to initiate a formal engagement process.In an interview with IP Nederland, Borgdorff conceded that PFZW had underestimated the extent to which its divestment would be perceived as a boycott, and confirmed the scheme would now launch a “very extensive” review of its decision-making process.“This whole process warrants a deep and extensive review, and one of the issues that will be reviewed is how should we view all this in relation to our peers, including ABP,” he said.“Does this mean we should change our policy to better suit the policy of others? No, we have our own policy, and we need to take our own responsibility.“But perhaps it does mean we should devote more time beforehand to get to know the policy of others because, based on what I read in the newspapers and websites, I cannot explain the difference in policy between PFZW and ABP, and yet those policies lead to entirely different outcomes.”When pressed by IP Nederland on Flinterman’s advisory role, Borgdorff explained that PFZW had wanted “somebody significant, somebody who is significant internationally as well”, and pointed out that Flinterman was a rapporteur on the Middle East conflict for the United Nations.When asked whether the pension fund might have sought a more objective adviser for the role, he said: “I’m sure we could have found someone else, but then we also would have asked for a balanced opinion.”Borgdorff said PFZW had reviewed its entire decision-making process, including the role of the ethical committee, the investment committee and the board.“We have literally pored over the minutes,” he said. He added: “We recently had protestors on our doorstep, and, to get in the office, you had to pass through 250 demonstrators, and that does have an impact. Our own PGGM staff started to question what it is we’re doing. And I think that is a good thing. Let’s have that discussion.”PFZW’s director also conceded that he personally had been unprepared for the “commotion” the decision had caused.“I have spoken with a lot of representatives from Jewish organisations in the Netherlands, and what has deeply touched and unsettled me is that these people and their constituents are truly fearful, truly concerned and saddened,” he said.“They are afraid there will be an anti-Israel mood in The Netherlands reminiscent of the 1930s, and they are no longer sure they are still welcome here, as human beings.“And then you think – we made an investment decision. We were aware of the fact this would have an impact. But did we foresee this would so deeply impact the very hearts and lives of people? Well, that was a good deal more intense than we were prepared for.”Joel Voordewind, an MP for the CU party, said PFZW had “given into” the boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement against Israel.“By acting like this, the scheme goes further than the policies of both the Dutch government and the EU, which advocate discouragement of investment in Israel’s occupied territories, rather than an outright boycott,” he said.He said the pension fund had effectively taken a political stance on behalf of its participants.Esther Voet, director of pro-Israel organisation The Centre for Information and Documentation on Israel, decried Flinterman’s involvement in the decision in particular.“PFZW is applying double standards,” she added, “as it is still invested in Chinese banks that are active in Tibet.”Meanwhile, a Dutch Jewish action group called Tradition is Our Future has called for a “counter boycott” of PGGM, and asked Jewish organisations in the US to put pressure on Emory University in Atlanta to expel Else Bos, PGGM’s chief executive, from an advisory committee.The conclusions of PFZW’s review are expected some time in mid-March.Flinterman has declined to comment, citing confidentiality.last_img read more

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Area Basketball Scores (1-6)

first_imgArea Basketball Scores.Wednesday  (1-6)Ripley County Boys Tourney.1st Round Games.Batesville  38     Milan  29South Ripley  63     Jac-Cen-Del  46Rivertown Classic Girls Tourney.1st Round Games @ South Dearborn.Switz. County  63     Lawrenceburg  46South Dearborn  66     Rising Sun  44last_img

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