The tenant fees ban may cost pet owners more, says JLL’s Lucy Morton

first_imgMore people want to live in rented homes with their pets, but, says JLL’s residential estate agency business, it will inevitably bring extra costs.JLL has seen a 25% increase in tenants letting with pets in the last five years and, they say, these tenants are likely to see rents increase once the Tenant Fees Act comes in, due to the five-week deposit cap.Lucy Morton, Head of Residential Agency at JLL, said, “We have seen an increase in people letting with pets for several reasons; a rise in dog and cat ownership, the UK’s relaxed quarantine laws which came into effect in 2012, and the fact that tenants are renting for longer.“They want to make their house a home and this means bringing their pet. Landlords who allow tenants to keep pets usually charge a slightly higher deposit to cover any damage or additional cleaning should it be required.“With the five-week deposit cap, landlords may be deterred from letting to tenants with pets or forced to charge higher rents to cover any potential losses. The increase would depend on the rental value, but we anticipate approximately an additional 3-4% per week. For example, a rent of £700.00 per week would potentially rise to £725.00 per week to make up for the shortfall.”The well know pet champion, Jeremy Corbyn said last year that: “New plans unveiled by the Labour Party suggest that renters could be given the right to keep pets in their rental property”.Currently, under the Consumer Rights Act (2015) landlords can only refuse for pets to be kept in their property based on reasonable evidence. This would include refusal on the grounds of the animal’s size, the amount of damage it could cause in the property and its impact on the future prospect of re-letting the property.The Labour Party, therefore, proposed that to refuse to let a property to a tenant with a pet there would need to be evidence that the animal was a nuisance.In response, Richard Lambert, CEO at the National Landlords Association (NLA) said, “You can’t take a blanket approach to keeping or refusing pets. The NLA has consistently supported schemes that encourage landlords to take on pet owners, such as the Dog’s Trust’s ‘Lets With Pets’, but landlords should have a right to refuse permission so long as they justify their decision.”JLL residential landlords refusing pets lets with pets tenants fees cap Sheila Manchester tenant fee ban and pets March 20, 2019The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » The tenant fees ban may cost pet owners more, says JLL’s Lucy Morton previous nextRegulation & LawThe tenant fees ban may cost pet owners more, says JLL’s Lucy MortonIncreasing pet ownership in rented accommodation and the tenant fees ban are driving up rents, says estate agent JLL.Sheila Manchester20th March 201902,255 Viewslast_img read more

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Merton’s Winter Ball made £8,000 loss

first_imgMerton’s JCR and MCR are to cover the costs of last year’s Winter Ball, after it was announced that the event had made a loss of almost £8000.Oli Koo, Treasurer of the Merton Winter Ball, explained to the college at a general meeting that the losses were a result of problems with the ticketing system as well as communication issues amongst the organisers of the ball.The college also took a delivery of £6000 worth of Carlsberg beer the day after the ball, without the Treasurer’s knowledge. Incomplete budgets resulted in the Treasurer being unaware of required payments until after the ball. There were also additional problems with the ordering of champagne for guests.Speaking to Cherwell, Coo said, “It was a great pity that the ball ran a deficit, given all the effort and time committee members contributed towards its smooth running both in the run up to the event and on the night itself.”He added, “However, the two major factors which vitiated my attempts at accurate budgeting, highlighted in my ball report, were out of my hands”.The GM was told that confusion over the Ball’s refund policy made accounting difficult. Additionally, it was thought at first that more tickets had been sold than actually had been. This resulted in a £4000 hole in the budget.“I was told that we were legally obliged to refund all guests… This meant my budget was constantly fluctuating up to the day of the ball itself. An issue that was further exacerbated by the fact that we were still accepting payments on the day of the ball”, Koo explained.He further reported, “There was a technical glitch on the website. This meant that a significant number of unpaid ticket orders that exceeded the seven day payment window did not expire and were, therefore, counted as paid.“A secondary and related issue was that this glitch led to fewer sales than would otherwise have been possible; around week four, I had been told that we had sold out of tickets, whereas in fact there were many tickets that were available.” Chairman of the Ball Committee Tim Foot indicated that the lack of sponsorship was another contributing factor to the deficit in the budgets. “The lack of sponsorship meant that we were operating on a lower income, and with higher costs, than should have been the case,” he said.“Our Sponsorship Officer resigned at the start of Michaelmas term, at which point it was too late to seek further funds. We did negotiate discounts for our guests at Shepherd & Woodward and The Student White Tie Company, but this is the absolute minimum that could have been arranged, and sponsorship largely failed.”Foot went on to point out that committee members had instead gone to great lengths to make up for the dearth of commercial backing by negotiating discounts with suppliers instead.Other last minute and unforeseeable problems were remedied swiftly. When the company contracted to provide Dodgems for ball-goers was unable to deliver, Victorian carnival games were sought as a replacement.It was also suggested by the ball committee that the common rooms might recuperate significant funds from the ball’s headlining act. Crystal Fighters were contracted to play for a certain amount of time, but reportedly failed to fill the agreed time slot. The JCR may pursue legal action if the band declines to pay the £5000 which the ball organisers have calculated that the JCR is owed.“Whatever the outcome of the negotiations and potential court cases, I think it’s fairly safe to say Crystal Fighters won’t be coming back to Oxford in a hurry,” noted one second year. “But at least the money would go some way to cover the JCR’s costs though if we won”.The JCR and MCR are currently planning to split the costs equally.One first year historian noted that the JCR seemed to sympathise with the organisers. They added, “I think it would be a bit unfair to be too harsh on the ball organisers. The sponsorship was unfortunate and while some of the other hiccups were surely avoidable the committee had very little experience to draw upon – the previous ball organisers left them no information at all”.Plans to provide the next ball committee with more information have been drawn up.One undergraduate told Cherwell, “I think that Tim and co are forgiven despite everything. As long as the JCR still has enough funds to provide the free alcohol it does throughout the term, everyone will be happy.”last_img read more

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News story: Elite force of UK Armed Forces Cyber Reserves steps up to join fight against evolving threats

first_imgThis morning the Defence Secretary thanked civil servant reservists at a specially hosted breakfast in 10 Downing St. Speaking at a reception for Reservists in the house of Commons last night, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said: Reservists play a vital role in our Armed Forces, bringing a huge range of experiences and skills to the defence of our country. As the threats we face intensify we need to attract the brightest and the best from all walks of life as part of a modern military. As the nation marks Reserves Day today, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson praised these exceptionally talented people and called for more specialists such as engineers, chefs, media operations and electricians to step up and join the UK Armed Forces as Reservists. The men and women of our Reserve forces give up their free time training to work alongside regular troops around the world. From telecoms workers and police officers to students they serve our country when called upon in a huge variety of roles such as dog handlers, logistics movers, intelligence officers and medics. For me, it’s important to give something back. I have been able to use my skill sets as an educator and in the Army to complement each other. In school it gave me a different outlook on life. Some people whinge about how bad things are, but thanks to my military experiences I have a better balance in life, which means I don’t get vexed. It means you’re more robust as a person. And I’ve been able to give young people better advice in school. I get youngsters asking me for careers advice about joining any of the Armed forces, and that is very satisfying. Reservist Colonel Sion Walker is a teacher by trade. He is currently deployed as Commanding Officer of Op ORBITAL, which is a UK programme to train the Ukrainian military in non-lethal skills and tactics such as the identification of mines, medical care and logistics.Colonel Sion Walker is leading the operation. He said:last_img read more

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Supermarket war continues as market reaches low

first_imgCompetition within supermarkets has driven down grocery inflation to zero. The latest figures from Kantar Worldpanel, published for the 12 weeks ending 14 September, also show a record low for grocery market growth of 0.3%.Kantar said this was a reflection of the impact of Aldi and Lidl, the market’s competitive response, as well as deflation in some major categories including bread.Aldi has continued to see double-digit growth, with a year-on-year sales increase of 29.1%. Meanwhile, Tesco shows little sign of recovery, as sales remain down by 4.5%, leaving it a market share of 28.8%.Fraser McKevitt, head of retail and consumer insight at Kantar Worldpanel, said: “Consumers are currently benefiting from intense price competition between the grocers. For the first time ever we’ve seen the average basket of everyday goods bought today costing exactly the same as it did a year ago. “With some staple groceries, such as vegetables, milk and bread, prices are actually falling as the big retailers all compete for a bigger slice of shoppers’ wallets.”Asda has recorded the best results among the big four supermarkets this period and is the only one to increase its market share, now at 17.4%. It has also seen an increase in sales, up 0.8% compared to last year.Grocery inflation has seen its 12th successive fall and now stands at zero for the same 12-week period.last_img read more

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Incredible Bakery set to increase Northamptonshire operation

first_imgWholesale craft business The Incredible Bakery Company is set to expand its site in Warkton, Northamptonshire.A £20,000 loan from finance and business support provider First Enterprise will enable The Incredible Bakery’s owners, Valeria and James Turner, to purchase new equipment and take on staff to support expansion.“The loan from First Enterprise has enabled us to not only invest in new equipment but also help cover cashflow during this period,” Valeria said.The business was set up in 2013 by the Turners after they discovered that their son Leon was affected by multiple food allergies. All their baked products are gluten-free, dairy-free; egg-free and soya-free, and the business does not process any of the 14 common food allergens as described by EC regulations.Victoria Copestake, business development manager at First Enterprise, said the company was proud to support Valeria and James.“Cashflow is a common issue for growing businesses and First Enterprise is here to help other businesses across the Midlands whether they need funding and advice to help them get started or to invest in new premises or equipment,” Copestake added.last_img read more

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Maurice ‘Mobetta’ Brown Shares New Soul-Infused Single “Destination Hope” [Listen]

first_imgGrammy Award-winning trumpet player Maurice “Mobetta” Brown is no stranger to working with some of the most talented musicians in the world. He was mentored by the iconic Wynton Marsalis, arranged the entire 11-piece horn section for Tedeschi Trucks Bands’ 2011 album Revelator (which won a Grammy for Best Blues Album in 2012), and has played alongside incredible stars such as Santigold, Wyclef Jean, Talib Kweli, Cee-Lo, Diddy, Musiq Soulchild, and more. They call him “Mobetta” for a reason; from a musical standpoint, it doesn’t get much better than Mo Brown.Currently working on his own solo material, The Mood due out March 2017, Brown has released his latest single “Destination Hope,” featuring singer Chris Turner and spoken word poet J. IVY. It’s a jazzy, soul-infused number with straight hip-hop beats that will keep your head swaying even after the track ends.Brown tells us about the track: “Destination Hope represents a place of encouragement & inclusion in place of resentment & division, a place where there is no racism or discrimination. A place where people have respect for one another, their communities and the environment. It’s very easy to get caught up in the negativity & that leads to hopelessness. In these trying times, I sought to create a mood that would uplift people and give them a sense of hope. The destination is in the journey to get there; to actively & compassionately stand up for something better for ourselves & future generations is to cultivate hope.”Take a listen below:last_img read more

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Students celebrate Asian cultures at fair

first_imgThe sounds of samulnori drums were heard throughout LaFortune Student Center on Sunday, ringing from the ballroom, which was transformed into a fair where three cultures came together to celebrate the languages, cultures and diversity at Notre Dame. The language programs of the department of East Asian languages and cultures held their fifth annual “Celebrate Asia!” event to celebrate the unique cultures of China, Japan and Korea.“Celebrate Asia!” is sponsored by the department of East Asian languages and cultures and the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies.Students got their creative juices flowing by hand-designing Korean fans called “buchaes” and practicing calligraphy in Chinese, Japanese or Korean. Some got competitive in “wuzi qi,” a traditional Chinese board game that resembles Connect Four. Others tested their motor skills by playing “ti jianzi,” a game that involves keeping a weighted shuttlecock in the airborne using their feet.Yongping Zhu, associate professor and Chinese program coordinator, highlighted the importance of this event.“We believe that language and culture cannot be separated,” he said. “Students will learn the languages better once they know the cultures. … Through this event, students will not only learn the culture in their target languages but also other related East Asian cultures.”As for next year, Zhu said he already had some ideas to further improve the event. He said each program replaces an activity or two each year to meet the students’ interests. While most booths exhibit traditional cultures of the countries, the planning committee is looking to increase the number of activities that better represent modern East Asia.Professional specialist Noriko Hanabusa said the event could make the Japanese program and Japanese culture more visible on campus.“Unlike Chinese and Korean, [the] Japanese program is facing serious challenges: We have very few native speakers or heritage speakers of Japanese on campus and in the South Bend community,” Hanabusa said. “ … So, it is difficult for students taking Japanese to use the language in the real-life context. We are actively planning to have extracurricular activities and events to get [these speakers together, and] ‘Celebrate Asia!’ is one of them.“The focus in our language classes is practicing the skills of languages, and we do not have enough time to talk about various cultural aspects. The event could introduce some unique culture on hands-on activities, which I think is very important.”Hanabusa said the faculty members of all three programs spent a lot of time planning to make “Celebrate Asia!” an annual occasion and that it is a testament of the three programs’ ability to communicate.In attendance were language students, international students, Asian Americans and students who just wanted to learn about the East Asian cultures. Students in a Chinese, Japanese or Korean language class were required to attend this class as part of the course requirements. A pamphlet listing all the activities and a brief description of each was provided to every participant. Students received stamps after visiting each booth, and eight stamps were required to receive the credit for attending the event.A number of participants brought friends outside of the language classes; some came for the culture, activities and fun, others came for the food.The event offered East Asian food not found in the dining halls. The Chinese program ordered entrees from JW Chen’s. The Japanese program provided a variety of sushi from the local Martin’s Supermarket. The Korean program offered sweet rice cake desserts from nearby Oriental Market.Qinfeng Wu, an international graduate student, said his favorite aspect of the event was the ability to introduce so many parts of the Asian culture in a fun way and in a short amount of time.“It’s like a crash course, very efficient in raising people’s interests in Asia,” Wu said.Wu noted some of the limitations of such an event. He said the activities represented only very small portion of the Chinese culture but also said that the fun activities kept the students engaged and is a good complement to the classroom lectures.Dennis Zheng, a student enrolled in second-year Chinese, said the event did a good job not only in representing and highlighting his culture, but also in showcasing the cultures of other East Asian countries.“As a Chinese American, I also caught a glimpse of how the Korean and the Japanese cultures engaged in recreational activities as compared to the Chinese,” Zheng said. “ … This event highlights expression of culture through recreational activities.”Tags: Celebrate Asia, Chinese program, Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies.last_img read more

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Facing the Future.

first_img Michael Boehlje of Purdue University on the drivers and consequences of structural change in agriculture. Marc Johnson, dean of agriculture at Kansas State University, on agriculture’s stake in emerging technologies. Noel Estensen, CEO of Cenex Harvest States Cooperatives, on the challenges facing cooperatives in a changing farm economy. Tom Zinnen of the University of Wisconsin on educating consumers on biotechnology. Bob Stallman, president of American Farm Bureau, on needed policy changes. Luther Tweeten of Ohio State University, on maximizing agriculture’s ability to benefit from new technologies. And a field hearing by the U.S. Senate Agricultural Committee, chaired by Georgia Sen. Paul Coverdell. The second annual National Symposium on the Future of American Agriculture will bringtogether the leading U.S. experts to identify the farm challenges facing the nation.The gathering will feature farm policy makers, authorities from agricultural collegesand leaders of national commodity, environmental and consumer groups. It’s scheduled forAug. 10-11 at the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education in Athens, Ga.The 1999 program drew 300 people to Georgia to wrangle over the farm crisis, lookingfor a starting point for solutions.Their discussions and proceedings went to the U.S. Senate agricultural committee as itdeliberated farm and food legislation. Agriculture Policy RevisionsThis year’s theme is “Structural Change and Technology: the PolicyImplications.” The discussions will focus on the ways agriculture is changing and onthe alternative policy revisions needed to address them.Among the highlights: The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the Farm Foundation willsponsor the event.How to RegisterThe symposium fee is $130 before July 14. It’s $150 after that. You may register on theWeb at www.gactr.uga.edu/conferences/index.html.If you have questions, call 1-800-884-1381 or (706) 542-2134. For reservations at theGeorgia Center, call 1-800-774-2760 or (706) 542-6364.last_img read more

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Editorial: A Call to Invest in the Economic Transition of Coal-Mining Communities

first_imgEditorial: A Call to Invest in the Economic Transition of Coal-Mining Communities FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From the Los Angeles Times:Though transitioning away from fossil fuels is absolutely necessary, it’s also vitally important to recognize the human and economic cost that such a change entails. That includes a significant number of jobs lost in northern Appalachia, Indiana and Illinois, and Wyoming, where the vast majority of the nation’s existing coal mines are found. Closing coal mines means cutting good-paying jobs in places where replacement work for similar pay is hard to come by. Though that shouldn’t slow the move away from fossil fuel, our energy policies need to be mindful of the disparate effect on coal-dependent communities, many of which are in rural and economically weak areas of the country.A bill in Congress could mitigate some of that economic impact. The proposed RECLAIM (Revitalizing the Economy of Coal communities by Leveraging local Activities and Investing More) Act would tweak an existing program aimed at securing old abandoned mines — for the sake of public safety as well as environmental protection — to make $1 billion available over five years for economic development primarily in old coal mining areas of Appalachia. The measure, introduced by Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Ky.) and backed by a bipartisan group of Appalachian lawmakers as well as the Sierra Club, dovetails with the Obama administration’s Power-Plus program, a broader effort to encourage economic diversification, job creation and other support for communities now reliant on coal mines and coal-fired power plants, as well as carbon-capture and sequestration projects.The RECLAIM Act would take a portion of the money that now goes into the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund, which is dedicated to cleaning up mines closed before 1977, and redirect it to economic development projects in old coal communities suffering from their mines’ environmental effects and the decline in coal jobs. The Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund is financed through a fee on mined coal, which has raised $10.5 billion since 1977.Rogers’ bill would make available $200 million a year over five years for reclamation projects that dovetail with economic development proposals on or adjacent to the abandoned mine sites. In essence, the backers say, the RECLAIM Act would take fee revenue that the government already has in hand and make it available sooner than it otherwise would be.There’s a broader concern over whether the shrinking fees collected from coal will be enough to cover all the obligations the fund already has, including about $9 billion worth of “high priority” projects. But supporters say the RECLAIM Act wouldn’t affect that bottom line, since the money allocated under it would still go to reclamation projects.Notably, the reclamation fund isn’t responsible for the restoration work that will eventually be needed at currently operating mines. Those businesses are supposed to post bonds to ensure that the land will be reclaimed once the mining is finished, whether the coal firm survives or not. Several states have let companies off that hook, however, by allowing them to put up little more than a pledge that they’ll fund the work. As the industry collapses, that looms as a significant potential problem for environmental remediation.Still, it makes sense to twin economic development proposals with reclamation projects. Although Rogers’ proposal wouldn’t compensate for all the job losses already caused by the shrinking coal industry, it marks a positive step in both recognizing and addressing the economic fallout of leaving coal behind. Congress should pass this bill and the president should sign it. But the government should also ensure that the initial goal of the reclamation program — to mitigate dangerous abandoned coal mines — is fulfilled.Full editorial: How do we ditch dirty coal power without sending miners to the unemployment line?last_img read more

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Harry Styles Movie ‘Don’t Worry Darling’ Halted Over COVID-19 Test

first_img– Advertisement – Harry Styles, Florence Pugh and more stars of the upcoming movie Don’t Worry Darling were forced to quarantine after a crew member tested positive for the novel coronavirus.New Line Cinemas confirmed to Deadline that it temporarily shut down production on the Olivia Wilde-directed psychological thriller in downtown Los Angeles on Wednesday, November 4. The website reported that the person who contracted the virus “was in close enough proximity” to the cast, which also includes Chris Pine, Gemma Chan, KiKi Layne and Nick Kroll, so the studio decided that it was necessary to stop filming in case any others were exposed.- Advertisement – Styles joined the cast of Don’t Worry Darling in September after Shia LaBeouf departed due to a scheduling conflict. Filming began on October 20.The movie — which Wilde, 36, also cowrote and stars in — is set in California in the 1950s and follows a housewife named Alice (Pugh) who discovers that her husband, Jack (Styles), is hiding a dark secret. It is the former One Direction member’s second movie role following 2017’s Dunkirk, in which he played a British soldier named Alex. After wrapping Don’t Worry Darling, Styles is set to star alongside Lily James in the LGBTQ drama My Policeman.The “Watermelon Sugar” singer decided to return to acting after the pandemic forced him to postpone his Love on Tour until 2021.- Advertisement – Production is expected to be on hold for approximately 14 days as Styles, 26, Pugh, 24, Pine, 40, and the rest of the cast and crew self-isolate.Don’t Worry Darling is not the first movie to stop filming amid the COVID-19 pandemic. After Tom Hanks tested positive for the virus in March, the Baz Luhrmann-directed Elvis Presley biopic in which the Forrest Gump star, 64, plays the late singer’s longtime manager, Tom Parker, had to press pause on production. Six months later, Robert Pattinson was reportedly diagnosed with the coronavirus, delaying filming for The Batman.- Advertisement – “I’m lucky I’m with friends in our little, safe self-isolation pod,” he told BBC Radio’s 1Xtra Residency in March. “It’s a strange time, but we’re just being careful, listening to music, playing games, doing some face masks. You know, the classic quarantine stuff!”Scroll down to see more photos of the Don’t Worry Darling cast on set before the shutdown.last_img read more

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