Rowe’s secures national distribution with Tesco

first_imgCornish craft bakery Rowe’s has sealed a deal to supply Tesco stores nationwide with scones under the Tesco Finest brand.Rowe’s already supplies Tesco stores in the South West region with own-brand baked goods, but this is the first time the bakery has secured a national contract with the multiple.The new scones, available in sultana and cheese flavours, are specially designed to naturally break into two halves, with bakers at Rowe’s formulating the recipe so that a slight crack is present in the finished product. The sultana scones are available in 650 stores nationwide and retail at £1.39 per pack, while the cheese scones are available in 400 stores and retail at £1.49.“The Tesco Finest scones represent an entirely new venture for us in terms of having a national distribution,” said Paul Pearce, director of marketing at Rowe’s. “We use locally sourced ingredients wherever possible in all our products, coupled with traditional craft baking techniques. It’s fantastic for us to see a product that we’ve developed from scratch launched in Tesco stores nationwide.”Tesco marketing manager Jo Wren added: “It’s great for us to be able to bring local suppliers like this into national tenders.”WC Rowe was established in 1949 in Falmouth, Cornwall. The company has 17 outlets and also supplies Rowe’s branded and own-label products to national retailers and supermarkets throughout the UK.The company was named Bakery Supplier of the Year in last year’s Baking Industry Awards after working closely with Sainsbury’s to develop a premium scone range under the Taste the Difference brand.last_img read more

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Go Behind the Scenes With the Cast of Peter Pan Live!

first_img View Comments It’s time to start sending out the save the dates for your Peter Pan Live! viewing party! Below we have our first proper behind the scenes look at what we have to look forward to on the NBC telecast. Catch a glimpse of Allison Williams, in her “absolute dream job,” learning how to fly, be relieved to find out that Broadway fave Christian Borle is getting his exercise and as for Christopher Walken? He’s making the role of Captain Hook his own. Of course he is. The show, also starring Kelli O’Hara, Minnie Driver, Taylor Louderman and some of our favorite Newsies, airs on December 4.last_img

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‘A Low- to No-Growth Environment’ for Coal-Fired Electricity

first_img‘A Low- to No-Growth Environment’ for Coal-Fired Electricity FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence:“The coal industry has a long-term ‘aging out’ problem,” said Joe Aldina, director of U.S. coal at PIRA Energy Group, an analytics and forecasting unit of S&P Global Platts. “With the average age of coal units around 40 years and no plans to build new capacity, a big chunk of the coal fleet can reliably operate for only another 10 to 15 years, especially with increasing demands for cycling, which is tougher on a plant.”Coal and older gas plants continue to make up the bulk of plant retirements, while new gas plants, solar and wind have dominated capacity additions.In June 2017, SSR LLC analysts Eric Selmon and Hugh Wynne warned that flat demand and capacity additions would likely erode gas and coal capacity factors through 2019. The existing fleet of fossil fuel plants will be squeezed by stagnant power demand and rising capacity from wind, solar and more efficient natural gas plants, they said.Aldina said that while some increased utilization of existing capacity could help some producers serving particular power plants, overall tonnage consumed will likely hold flat or decrease as producers are “staring down a low- to no-growth environment.” He said expects overall coal burn will likely decrease as new gas supply goes to markets and keeps prices below $3/MMBtu on average.“Renewables and gas-fired plants are being built that often displace coal plants in the dispatch stack based on economics, which is why overall coal demand will be flat to declining,” Aldina said. “Remaining plants may get a bigger share of the pie from higher utilization, but it’s ultimately a smaller pie. Producers will have to prepare for that and keep production in line with demand.”More: ($) US coal capacity factor gives room to burn, but may not offset customer losslast_img read more

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U.S. corporations benefitting from PREPA rebuilding, but is Puerto Rico?

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Huffington Post:Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, the state-owned power monopoly, has awarded $4.4 billion in contracts to companies hired to repair the extensive damage to the island’s aging electrical grid. But outages are an enduring and lethal fact of life in Puerto Rico, where the grid remains fragile. An earthquake in January 2020 plunged the island into darkness once again, and now they are looking at a hurricane season forecast to be one of the most active in years.A joint analysis by HuffPost and NBCLX finds that the vast majority of grid reconstruction-related contracts have gone to American firms, including fossil fuel companies, construction firms connected to the Trump administration and consultants such as former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R). Of the publicly available information on deals awarded since 2017, mainland U.S. contractors received roughly 84%, totaling $3.7 billion.PREPA, meanwhile, is currently hammering out a deal to hand over control of the electrical distribution system for 15 years to a trio of private operators: Houston-based grid manager Quanta Services, North Carolina-headquartered disaster response firm IEM, and ATCO Ltd., a gas firm based in Calgary, Canada. That contract has not yet been released.The share of contracts directed to companies outside the United States’ largest territorial possession is not necessarily surprising. But the finding raises new questions about who is benefiting most from Puerto Rico’s rebuilding process, stoking century-old tensions over the colonial relationship between the United States and its largest territorial possession, whose decades long debt crisis spurred ongoing and brutal austerity cuts.Controversies over PREPA’s contracts began just months after the hurricane, when the utility awarded a $300 million contract to Whitefish Energy Holdings, a tiny Montana firm with ties to then-Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, which months earlier had been on shaky financial grounds. PREPA quickly canceled the contract amid a national firestorm over the deal. But the state-owned power monopoly continued awarding hefty contracts to U.S. companies at prices Puerto Rican union officials say far exceeded what local workers would charge.Months later, PREPA agreed to pay the Florida-based construction firm MasTec $400 per streetlight it repaired, even though the union proposed to carry out the same work for $60 per light. Yet the total payout of $5 million was dwarfed by the $500 million contract PREPA gave MasTec in May 2018 to restore transmission lines. The deal drew criticism from Puerto Rico’s fiscal control board, the panel of officials Congress put in charge of the island’s public budget in an effort to ensure the territory’s Wall Street creditors were repaid. MasTec did not respond to a request for comment.Tom Sanzillo, the finance director at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, a nonprofit that researches energy issues, said the deal exemplified the lucrative business opportunity public contracts offer to former politicians looking to cash in on connections to the sitting administration. (Christie, whose relationship with Trump has at times been critical, was among the president’s first rivals in early 2016 to drop out and endorse the former reality TV host.)Sanzillo, a former acting comptroller for New York State, has spent the past month raising concerns about another eyebrow-raising PREPA contract given to a major Democratic donor. In March 2019, the utility agreed to pay New Fortress Energy, a fracked-gas infrastructure giant founded and run by billionaire Wes Edens, $1.5 billion to convert two units of the utility’s diesel-burning power plant in San Juan to gas. It was the highest price tag of any post-hurricane PREPA deal. But the cost came with an ambitious timeline. New Fortress would have the units up and running by June 2019. The speed with which the company aimed to build the gas infrastructure seemed to support the utility’s claim that fracked gas, a climate-changing fuel that generally produces less toxic air pollution than diesel, would act as a “bridge” to low-emissions renewables and batteries.New Fortress wasn’t just late on finishing construction. The process that led to the deal was plagued by process irregularities that gave New Fortress “an unfair advantage,” according to the claims in a scathing report from IEEFA and the Puerto Rican watchdog group CAMBIO, based on internal documents released through a lawsuit. The report detailed allegations of how New Fortress submitted an unsolicited proposal and secured meetings with PREPA and its financial adviser, Filsinger Energy Partners, before the utility even drafted its requests for proposal on the project in April 2018.[Alexander C. Kaufman and Bianca Graulau]More: Puerto Rico’s troubled utility is a goldmine for U.S. contractors U.S. corporations benefitting from PREPA rebuilding, but is Puerto Rico?last_img read more

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Colombian Armed Forces Help Former Guerrilla Women Demobilize and Reintegrate

first_imgThe increasing number of women in the ranks of the FARC since 2002 is no accident. The terrorist organization has actively recruited women to join its ranks. For instance, in 2008, the FARC secretariat issued a directive to increase the recruitment of women and children to compensate for heavy losses in the battlefield and dwindling enlistments. Currently, about 25 percent of the estimated 8,200 active FARC guerrillas are women, according to a Ministry of Defense estimate. Despite the importance of women to the FARC, the ELN, and the AUC, these terrorist groups often mistreat female recruits. In addition to enduring unplanned or unwanted pregnancies, about 13 percent of the women in terrorist groups contract sexually transmitted diseases such as syphilis, according to the GAHD. Women in these homes are asked to fill out a sheet to record their family, work, educational, and community history, in order to help GAHD officials identify their strengths and help them plan their next step when they leave, typically after two months. “Armed groups carry out abortions all the time,” said Nelson Alberto Torres, one of the medical chiefs of the GAHD’s Health branch. “Often, they perform what we call artisanal surgeries in which they can remove a woman’s uterus or ovaries.” Women endure mistreatment by guerrilla groups The process can be difficult for some demobilized women who are accustomed to the guerrilla lifestyle in which day-to-day survival is their primary concern, according to Ávila. But women can change and adapt. Women have become an integral part of the FARC and other guerrilla organizations, to the extent that these terrorist groups would face major problems without them, according to Colombia’s Ministry of Defense. Such mistreatment is a powerful motive for women to demobilize. In 2014, of the 1,349 demobilizations by former FARC and ELN guerrillas, 23 percent were women. Each terrorist group has different rules that impact women in different ways. For example, the FARC and the ELN have different rules regarding pregnancies. Women demobilize to escape mistreatment Each terrorist group has different rules that impact women in different ways. For example, the FARC and the ELN have different rules regarding pregnancies. “Armed groups carry out abortions all the time,” said Nelson Alberto Torres, one of the medical chiefs of the GAHD’s Health branch. “Often, they perform what we call artisanal surgeries in which they can remove a woman’s uterus or ovaries.” In the FARC, women who get pregnant typically must get an abortion. In some cases, for example, if their partner is a FARC commander, the women are allowed to give birth, but then must give away their baby to relatives or even strangers, such as farmers. Approximately 74 percent of the women who have demobilized have had at least one abortion, according to the GAHD. The figure is so high because there are typically three men for each woman in each guerrilla group, so sexual partners are constantly rotated. Some female guerrillas demobilize to protect their unborn children or to reclaim those they were forced to give away, often even managing to convince their partners to abandon the ranks as well, Ávila said. In addition to enduring unplanned or unwanted pregnancies, about 13 percent of the women in terrorist groups contract sexually transmitted diseases such as syphilis, according to the GAHD. As a consequence, encouraging demobilizations by female guerrillas weakens the terrorist groups they leave and improves public safety. When a woman demobilizes from a guerrilla group, the GAHD, the Colombian Agency for Reintegration (ACR), and several other government agencies help them with social, health, psychological, educational, and financial assistance. These services are part of a comprehensive approach designed to provide demobilized women the tools they need to rejoin civil society. Preparing for life after the conflict, the Colombian Armed Forces is working hard so that a growing number of women who once fought for guerrilla groups but have demobilized can reintegrate into society. “The women from the guerrilla groups are independent and strong-willed,” Ávila said. “Many times they are much more willing to educate themselves and seek aid than the men are. That is a great advantage.” “Whereas in the FARC it is not permitted to have children and abortions are the rule, in the ELN they are given leaves to have their children after they’ve spent two or three years in the group,” said Ávila, a health professional with a master’s degree in clinical psychology who is responsible for evaluating and interviewing the women who flee from both guerrilla groups. Approximately 74 percent of the women who have demobilized have had at least one abortion, according to the GAHD. The figure is so high because there are typically three men for each woman in each guerrilla group, so sexual partners are constantly rotated. Women have become an integral part of the FARC and other guerrilla organizations, to the extent that these terrorist groups would face major problems without them, according to Colombia’s Ministry of Defense. They actually recruit most of the women in their ranks as teenagers. Once the female teenagers have joined a guerrilla organization, they endure physical and psychological mistreatment, according to the GAHD. For example, the GAHD provides newly demobilized women with housing in places known as “peace homes,” where they receive food, basic education, psychological support, and attend workshops to prepare them to rejoin civil society. Since 2003, more than 25,000 former members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the National Liberation Army (ELN), and the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) have demobilized. The government is engaged in ongoing peace talks with the FARC in Havana. In recent years, the percentage of female guerrillas who demobilized has increased. Such mistreatment is a powerful motive for women to demobilize. In 2014, of the 1,349 demobilizations by former FARC and ELN guerrillas, 23 percent were women. Women endure mistreatment by guerrilla groups For example, the GAHD provides newly demobilized women with housing in places known as “peace homes,” where they receive food, basic education, psychological support, and attend workshops to prepare them to rejoin civil society. The process can be difficult for some demobilized women who are accustomed to the guerrilla lifestyle in which day-to-day survival is their primary concern, according to Ávila. But women can change and adapt. Women in these homes are asked to fill out a sheet to record their family, work, educational, and community history, in order to help GAHD officials identify their strengths and help them plan their next step when they leave, typically after two months. “Women in the guerrillas play important sexual and emotional roles,” said Dalia Andrea Ávila, a retired Army officer who now heads a group of psychologists from the GAHD. “If it weren’t for them, the men wouldn’t be able to stay in the jungles or mountains for as long as they do.” When a woman demobilizes from a guerrilla group, the GAHD, the Colombian Agency for Reintegration (ACR), and several other government agencies help them with social, health, psychological, educational, and financial assistance. These services are part of a comprehensive approach designed to provide demobilized women the tools they need to rejoin civil society. “Whereas in the FARC it is not permitted to have children and abortions are the rule, in the ELN they are given leaves to have their children after they’ve spent two or three years in the group,” said Ávila, a health professional with a master’s degree in clinical psychology who is responsible for evaluating and interviewing the women who flee from both guerrilla groups. For example, in 2006, the percentage of female demobilized guerrillas increased from 13 percent to nearly 26 percent, according to the Group of Humanitarian Attention for the Demobilized (GAHD), which is part of the Ministry of Defense. Since 2003, more than 25,000 former members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the National Liberation Army (ELN), and the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) have demobilized. The government is engaged in ongoing peace talks with the FARC in Havana. In recent years, the percentage of female guerrillas who demobilized has increased. As a consequence, encouraging demobilizations by female guerrillas weakens the terrorist groups they leave and improves public safety. In the FARC, women who get pregnant typically must get an abortion. In some cases, for example, if their partner is a FARC commander, the women are allowed to give birth, but then must give away their baby to relatives or even strangers, such as farmers. The increasing number of women in the ranks of the FARC since 2002 is no accident. The terrorist organization has actively recruited women to join its ranks. For instance, in 2008, the FARC secretariat issued a directive to increase the recruitment of women and children to compensate for heavy losses in the battlefield and dwindling enlistments. Currently, about 25 percent of the estimated 8,200 active FARC guerrillas are women, according to a Ministry of Defense estimate. “Women in the guerrillas play important sexual and emotional roles,” said Dalia Andrea Ávila, a retired Army officer who now heads a group of psychologists from the GAHD. “If it weren’t for them, the men wouldn’t be able to stay in the jungles or mountains for as long as they do.” They actually recruit most of the women in their ranks as teenagers. Once the female teenagers have joined a guerrilla organization, they endure physical and psychological mistreatment, according to the GAHD. Preparing for life after the conflict, the Colombian Armed Forces is working hard so that a growing number of women who once fought for guerrilla groups but have demobilized can reintegrate into society. Some female guerrillas demobilize to protect their unborn children or to reclaim those they were forced to give away, often even managing to convince their partners to abandon the ranks as well, Ávila said. For example, in 2006, the percentage of female demobilized guerrillas increased from 13 percent to nearly 26 percent, according to the Group of Humanitarian Attention for the Demobilized (GAHD), which is part of the Ministry of Defense. Women demobilize to escape mistreatment Despite the importance of women to the FARC, the ELN, and the AUC, these terrorist groups often mistreat female recruits. By Dialogo March 04, 2015 “The women from the guerrilla groups are independent and strong-willed,” Ávila said. “Many times they are much more willing to educate themselves and seek aid than the men are. That is a great advantage.” Hmm, I don’t know, sometimes I think there’s some truth to this, but it would also be good to circulate what is happening in the army with female recruits, report on the human rights violations inside military units. I think it’s incredible well yesterday I went into the same webpage and there was another news item about coca. I think it’s a well-thought out strategy, what I wonder, though, is after the two months, do they stay with them or what will happen to the women?last_img read more

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The CUInsight Experience podcast: Larry Sewell – Better together (#94)

first_imgThank you for tuning in to episode 93 of The CUInsight Experience podcast with your host, Randy Smith, co-founder of CUInsight.com. This episode is brought to you by Trellance transforming data into actionable insight for credit unions from coast to coast.My guest on today’s show is Larry Sewell. Larry is the VP of Corporate Partnership and Advocacy at Together Credit Union and the new Board Chair of the African American Credit Union Coalition. We talk about all the stuff going on at AACUC and the work that Larry and his team at Together Credit Union are doing in St. Louis. He came up through the credit union ranks as a trainer and helped build leaders his entire career.Larry shares tips on keeping his team connected with creativity and innovative strategies to stay engaged. Weekly virtual conversations assist with maintaining and increasing morale among staff and board members. Larry also discusses his new role with AACUC organization, their trajectory and the accomplishments he and the rest of the team are most proud of. Listen as Larry speaks about what inspired him to take the position at Together Credit Union and how it has elevated his outlook on leadership and progression. “Reach consensus,” is Larry’s best known phrase and something his team hears him say many times. During the rapid-fire questions, we learned that Larry is a Stevie Wonder fan. He wanted to be a businessman when he grew up, and his grandfather, who adopted him and his brother, is the first person who comes to mind when he hears the word “success”. From playing golf, to spending time with family, and volunteering, Larry enjoys the outdoors and assisting others in his community. Enjoy!Subscribe on: Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher Books mentioned on The CUInsight Experience podcast: Book List How to find Larry:Larry Sewell, VP of Corporate Partnership and Advocacy at Together Credit Union and Board Chair of the African American Credit Union Coalition (AACUC) [email protected] | Twitter | Facebook | Instagramwww.aacuc.orgTwitter | Facebook | LinkedIn Show notes from this episode:A big shout-out to our friends at Trellance, an amazing sponsor of The CUInsight Experience podcast. Thank you!Check out all the outstanding work that Larry and his team at Together Credit Union are doing here.While you’re at it, connect with AACUC on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.Shout-out: Rev. Jesse JacksonShout-out: Mr. Bert J. Hash Jr.Shout-out: Dan Berger, NAFCUShout-out: Sheilah MontgomeryShout-out: Renee SattiewhiteShout-out: Robert McKayShout-out: Maurice SmithShout-out: Lynette SmithShout-out: Shruti MiyashiroShout-out: Jill NowackiShout-out: MECU of BaltimoreShout-out: Michigan State Federal Credit UnionShout-out: Schools First Federal Credit UnionShout-out: SECU Shout-out: PSCUShout-out: CUESShout-out: CUNA Mutual GroupShout-out: VisaAlbum mentioned: Songs in the Key of Life by Stevie WonderBook mentioned: Anything by Stephen CoveyBook mentioned: Anything by Ken BlanchardBook mentioned: My American Journey by Colin PowellBook mentioned: Jackie Robinson: My Own Story by Jackie RobinsonBook mentioned: Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson MandelaPrevious guests mentioned in this episode: Dan Berger, Renee Sattiewhite, Lynette Smith, Maurice Smith, Shruti Miyashiro, Jill Nowacki (episodes 4, 18, 37, 64 & 82) This Episode:[01:36] – Welcome to the show, Larry![02:24] – Larry shares some hacks for keeping his team connected and engaged during the pandemic.[04:45] – Larry speaks about how they have stayed connected with their community and partners outside of the credit union walls.[07:47] – Listen as Larry talks about the AACUC organization, what he is proud of and where he sees them in the future.[11:22] – What are the first steps credit union leaders should take if they want to commit to change?[13:47] – If you hire someone outside of what you normally hire like people of color or women, you are not settling.[15:02] – Larry discusses what he thinks credit unions need to fundamentally change to keep up with the pace of change in financial services.[17:41] – Listen as Larry shares what he will be most proud of a year from now that his team and the board have accomplished.[19:38] – Larry talks about the conference of Credit Unions Unite Against Racism and the commitment to change series they had.[21:26] – Larry speaks about places he couldn’t go as a child because of his skin color.[23:45] – What inspired you to take the position at Together Credit Union.[24:28] – Larry shares how the inspiration has changed over the last four years.[25:54] – We need to reach a consensus is something his team has heard him say many times.[26:21] – Larry says that you need to have a title to be a leader is a myth he wants to debunk.[27:21] – What mistake did you make as a young leader, and what mistake do you see young leaders make today?[28:42] – Larry shares some advice for young leaders today, take the advice from someone who has already gone through it.[29:27] – Larry discusses something he learned early in his career that he still uses now.[30:59] – Listen as Larry speaks about how important mentors have been in his life.[33:10] – Golf, spending time with his family, and volunteering are how Larry recharges when he has a day off.[34:16] – Larry shares the first time he got into memorable trouble.[35:46] – He wanted to be a businessman when he grew up.[36:53] – Do you have a daily routine that if you don’t do your day feels off?[37:50] – What is the best album of all time?[38:47] – Is there a book you think everyone should read?[41:45] – Larry’s grandfather is the first person who comes to mind when he hears the word success.[43:06] – Larry shares some final thoughts for the listeners.[45:13] – Thank you for being on the show! 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Randall Smith Randall Smith is the co-founder of CUInsight.com, the host of The CUInsight Experience podcast, and a bit of a wanderlust.As one of the co-founders of CUInsight.com he … Web: www.CUInsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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Students show best way to improve your life is by improving others’

first_imgAccording to them, the best part is they’ll never know who they’ve helped. Despite the fact they’ve managed to raise the money, that isn’t the thing their teacher is most proud of. Kolby and Xavier were juniors last year when a teacher challenged them to do more in their community, but what they’ve accomplished since has challenged even that teacher’s sky high expectations. Even though they’re both graduating, both Kolby and Xavier told me they hope to see the program continue next year. They went to local businesses in delhi to raise funds to purchase any kind of clothing students of all ages may need. In the year and a half since their project started, the two of them have managed to raise more than two thousand dollars. DELHI, NY (WBNG) — Two Delaware Academy students saw a need in their community and decided to do something about it.center_img “That way when kids don’t have clothes at home and they don’t feel like telling anybody because they feel embarrassed, we don’t need to know either,” said Xavier Gardepe. “It’s just between the one teacher and Ms. Losie so they can supply the student with that stuff so they’re not made fun of. We’re not about that.” The seniors created a program to fund clothes for less fortunate students, and it’s made a difference in unexpected ways. The two originally came up with an idea to do a sock drive to help elementary students, but soon realized they could do much more than just that. “I think that in school we focus a lot on the education aspect of somebody’s life and not necessarily them as a whole, and I want them to realize that they have so much to offer, not just as students, not just in this case as mechanics, but as people. They’re good people,” said Abby Losie, an English teacher and the program coordinator.last_img read more

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Tips on where to get the best updated information on COVID-19

first_imgWhile it’s easy for people to get excited or nervous about the latest data released from the WHO and the CDC, the best way to know you’re getting the most accurate information is relying on your state and local level health resources. “Right now there is basically never-ending new information about COVID-19,” said Holochak. “It’s even difficult for us to keep up on everything with the New York State Department of Health.” (WBNG) — With several national and worldwide organizations releasing new information and guidelines on the coronavirus everyday, it can be hard to keep up on what is the most accurate. For more information on the latest guidelines and health safety information for New York, head over to the New York State Department of Health’s website. Holochak says whether you’re a business owner wondering what you’re allowed to open or you’re just curious about your personal health concerns, it’s easy to give your local health department a call.center_img At the Tioga County Health Department, public health educator, Kylie Holochak, says it can be confusing for people in her department as well. “Especially here in Tioga County, we’re always happy to take those phone calls,” said Holochak. “We always appreciate it when people call us for clarification. If we can’t give you an answer right away, we will track down the right answer for you.” The World Health Organization (WHO) released information recently that it quickly retracted. On Monday, it stated people who are asymptomatic with the virus rarely spread it to others. However, the next day, scientists stated they haven’t determined how frequently asymptomatic people actually spread it.last_img read more

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Kieran Tierney reveals how Arsenal players reacted to their dismal defeat at Brighton

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Kieran Tierney reveals how Arsenal players reacted to their dismal defeat at Brighton Kieran Tierney is remaining positive despite Arsenal’s disappointing results (Picture: Getty)Kieran Tierney insists Arsenal’s players have ‘reacted well’ in training after a particularly ‘quiet’ and somber bus journey home in the wake of their dismal 2-1 loss at Brighton last weekend.The Gunners are yet to pick up any points since the Premier League returned earlier this month, suffering successive defeats away to second-placed Manchester City and lowly Brighton. Mikel Arteta’s men appeared on course for victory at the Amex Stadium after Nicolas Pepe’s superb long-range strike in the 68th minute before a pair of late goals from Lewis Dunk and Neal Maupay sealed all three points for the hosts. Maupay was the pantomime villain as Arsenal lost at Brighton (Picture: Getty)A horrendous-looking injury to Bernd Leno add further misery to an already disappointing afternoon for Arsenal but the club have since confirmed that the German’s knee problem is not as serious as first feared.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTDiscussing Arsenal’s defeat on the south coast with Sky Sports, Tierney explained: ‘Obviously it’s not the result we wanted or the result we had worked hard for, but it’s something we need to deal with‘The bus journey was quiet on the way home, but I think we’ve reacted well in training. ‘We’ve got a point to prove and we need to go out there and get the results that the manager wants and the fans deserve. Tierney joined Arsenal from Celtic last summer (Picture: Getty)The Scotland international continued: ‘Every day in training you know you’re going there to work.‘There are times for a laugh and a joke – Mikel loves that as well – but when we’re working, we’re working. ‘It’s a lot of tactical stuff as well, and that’s going to help us all get an understanding of how he wants us to play.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal‘I’ve said before, something like that is not going to just work straight away, it’s going to be a process, but there is light at the end of the tunnel and we need to stay focused on that. ‘There are going to be bad results and bad games, but as a team we need to keep the confidence, stick together and kick on again.’Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page.MORE: Claudio Bravo speaks out on his future amid Arsenal transfer interestMORE: Steve Nicol suggests midfield role for David Luiz after Arsenal defender signs new one-year deal Arteta’s side travel to Southampton on Thursday night (Picture: Getty)The left-back says the squad are desperate to put things right following their miserable return to football.‘All the players are hurting, it’s a tough time for everyone at the club, but there are going to be better days ahead,’ Tierney added.‘The last two results haven’t been ideal, but the work-rate is still at 100 per cent every day in training. ‘We’re working so hard and we’re working to the game plan that the manager wants. We all believe in it and we’re all buying into it.’ Comment Metro Sport ReporterWednesday 24 Jun 2020 2:25 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link687Shareslast_img read more

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Hoops America: Hate to burst your bubble

first_imgFor some teams, conference tournament week is a magical time of year. It’s when Northwestern and Virginia Tech celebrate their newfound chances to make the NCAA tournament despite finishing mediocre regular seasons. Conversely, it’s also the most nerve wracking, potentially devastating time of the year for those aforementioned postseason hopes.See, 31 of the 65 NCAA tournament bids automatically go to the winners of each conference tournament. That means if Georgia suddenly decides to stop playing like a rec-league team and instead makes a miracle run to the SEC tournament title as it did last year, it goes to the Big Dance, 12-19 record and all. That’s bad news bears for the teams that had legitimate hopes to make the NCAA tourney.The problem is every “undeserving” team that gets an automatic bid potentially eliminates a bubble team like Michigan from making the tourney. It’s great for Cleveland State that they upset Butler to win the Horizon League; it’s also very bad for Creighton and Maryland. Butler is ranked No.16 and was a lock to get a bid regardless of whether or not it won the Horizon League title game. For Cleveland State on the other hand, this was their only chance and they made the most of it, to the dismay of bubble teams everywhere.Life as one of those bubble teams is frantic this week. For those still alive in their league tourneys, the focus on just winning their next game. Those that dropped out early have to gut it out until Sunday to see just how much they screwed up. That’s four long, stressful days to hope and pray that the rest of the No. 1 seeds win out as they’re expected. Unfortunately for the bubble teams, this isn’t the best year for predictable results.The regular season proved no team is invincible (see Maryland over UNC, Providence over Pittsburgh), and the little guys were very capable of raining on better teams’ postseason hopes. Case in point, Tuesday, DePaul got its first Big East win against Cincinnati in the first round of its conference tournament, breaking an 18-game losing streak. While that didn’t mean much for DePaul, it did affect Providence, who beat the Blue Demons yesterday. A hypothetical win against Cincinnati would have helped Providence’s tournament resume, while the actual win over DePaul didn’t mean much more than beating a high school team. In this case, nobody won.The truth is conference tournaments produce a lot more losers than winners, as far as NCAA bids are concerned. Creighton won 10 games versus teams in the top 100 RPI rankings, which stands out on tournament resumes. Unfortunately, their loss to Illinois State in the Missouri Conference tournament semifinals was probably their last game this season.Obviously every conference has one or two obvious favorites to win their tournaments, but judging by the results of the regular season, surprises shouldn’t be expected. Unfortunately for bubble teams, unless they happen to be the ones dishing out those surprises, this is mainly a bad thing. In the Big Ten, Michigan State looks like it has the talent and integrity to win the conference title to go with its regular season crown. However, three of the Spartans’ five losses were to teams currently on the bubble: Maryland, Northwestern and Penn State. Should Northwestern beat Minnesota in the first round of the Big Ten tournament, it would face Michigan State in the quarterfinal. With an NCAA bid on the line, the 17-12 Wildcats would surely be fired up for that game, besides the fact they know they can beat the Spartans.On the west coast, St. Mary’s players must be tearing their hair out every time Northwestern and DePaul win postseason games. The 25-6 Gaels are 45th in RPI and were ranked in the top 25 before losing their best player to injury. The player in question, Patrick Mills, returned in time for the West Coast Conference tournament, where St. Mary’s was crushed by Gonzaga. Now the Gaels are on the bubble and unfortunately not in control of their own fate. The fact Cleveland State won the Horizon League automatic bid did not sit well with St. Mary’s, or Creighton, or Penn State, or Florida or about 20 other teams that probably deserve to be in the tournament more.Of course, “deserve” is subjective in this sense; the rules are every conference tournament winner gets to be in the NCAA tournament, so by that definition, Cleveland State deserves its bid. On the other hand, do the Vikings have a realistic shot against the three or four seed they’ll probably play in the first round? Or at least a better shot than St. Mary’s would? Not to take anything away from them, but their presence in the tournament means a team that already knows it can win a game against a big time opponent, such as Boston College, doesn’t get that chance.While the fact that conference tournament season means everyone gets an extra life as far as NCAA bids go, in the end, every underdog that takes gets spot also takes away some of the excitement of the Big Dance itself. I’m happy Morehead State made their first NCAA tournament since 1984; I’m less than thrilled however, about the 19-15 Eagles’ (17-15 if you only count Division I wins) chances against a No. 1 seed in the first round. Granted, the theme of this year has been unexpected upsets and parity, but in that case it’s probably just wishful thinking.So for all you bubble teams, make like Journey and don’t stop believing. Until the main event actually starts, I’ll be rooting for the top seeds to win the conference tourneys right along with you. I mean, I’ll never get to know if Michigan can beat UCLA or Duke again if the Wolverines are stuck playing in the NIT. Let’s save the upsets and dark horse wins for next weekend.last_img read more

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