Utah State Men’s Basketball Visits San Jose State Wednesday

first_imgDecember 3, 2019 /Sports News – Local Utah State Men’s Basketball Visits San Jose State Wednesday Tags: San Jose State basketball/Utah State basketball Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSAN JOSE, Calif.-Wednesday, No. 25 Utah State (7-1) returns to action as they commence the Mountain West Conference season by visiting the San Jose State Spartans (3-5).The Aggies are coming off an 81-73 loss to Saint Mary’s November 29 at Moraga, Calif., their first loss of the season.Utah State is 63-19 (.768) all-time when ranked by The Associated Press.Aggies head coach Craig Smith (35-8, .814 at Utah State; 114-63, .644 as a collegiate head coach) has the best record of any coach in his first two seasons in program history.Utah State scores 81.4 points per game, tying them for 32nd nationally with St. John’s.While not posting last season’s numbers, senior guard Sam Merrill (17.4 points, 4.9 rebounds per game) is excellent again for the Aggies.Sophomore forward Justin Bean (14.8 points, a team-best 11.4 rebounds per game) continues to excel in the absence of star Portuguese national, sophomore center Neemias Queta, who is out indefinitely.Junior forward Alphonso Anderson (13.3 points, 5.8 rebounds per game) and Portuguese national, senior guard Diogo Brito (11.1 points per game, a team-best 19 steals), also score in double figures on average for the productive Aggies.Junior guard Abel Porter (a team-best 35 assists) has also been a solid glue guy for Utah State as he has traditionally been throughout his collegiate career.Junior center, Polish national Kuba Karwowski has a team-best 12 blocked shots to pace the Aggies’ defense.Utah State surrenders 60.6 points per game, ranking them 40th nationally in scoring defense.The Aggies rank 11th nationally in rebounding margin (+10) per game, out-rebounding opponents 41.9-31.1. The Aggies’ 42 rebounds per game ties them for 22nd nationally with Maryland.San Jose State is coached by Jean Prioleau who is 11-58 (.159) in his third season at the helm of the Spartans’ program.San Jose State scores 66.4 points per game, ranking them 284th nationally in scoring offense.Sophomore guard Seneca Knight (11.8 points, 5 rebounds per game) and junior guard Richard Washington (10.1 points, 5.4 rebounds per game) each score in double figures on average for the Spartans.Sophomore forward Christian Anigwe (a team-best 6.6 rebounds per game and 10 blocked shots), and senior guard Brae Ivey (a team-best 22 assists and 9 steals) also contribute to the Spartans’ cause.San Jose State surrenders 79.1 points per game, ranking them 329th nationally in scoring defense.The Aggies lead the Spartans 62-22 all-time, including a 21-14 advantage in the series at San Jose, Calif. Brad Jameslast_img read more

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USA: Secretary of Navy Recognized as One of the Top 50 CEOs

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today USA: Secretary of Navy Recognized as One of the Top 50 CEOs View post tag: Navy Authorities USA: Secretary of Navy Recognized as One of the Top 50 CEOs View post tag: £50 View post tag: Recognized View post tag: one View post tag: Top View post tag: Defense View post tag: Secretary Share this article View post tag: CEOs View post tag: Defence View post tag: Naval March 29, 2013 Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus was recently recognized by an online jobs and career community as one of the top 50 highest rated CEOs.Glassdoor released its annual report announcing the top CEOs earlier this month; Mabus was included on this list as the CEO for the Department of the Navy. Two hundred ninety-nine anonymous individuals independently contributed to Mabus receiving an over 81 percent positive rating on his leadership of the Navy. Mabus was the only leader of a federal agency to be recognized on the list.“This award is rightly shared by the many great leaders, both uniformed and civilian, present throughout the Department,” said Mabus. “I appreciate being recognized and it is especially meaningful knowing the rating is based upon feedback provided by current and former service members and Navy civilians,” Mabus said.For a CEO to be eligible to be included in Glassdoor’s report, they must receive at least 100 approval ratings from employees during the past year. This rating is based on information employees provide Glassdoor about their last place of employment and whether they approve or disapprove of their former CEO.While the comments posted on the site as part of the survey varied greatly, most reflected an appreciation of the importance Mabus places on maintaining partnerships around the globe. Many reviews by current and former service members indicated international travel and opportunities to “see the world” were among the most positive aspects of a career in the Navy. One reviewer who was identified as a former sonar technician cited travel and “being a part of something larger than yourself” as a “pro” of naval service.Mabus is part of a short list of top CEOs nominated from a pool of 250,000 others. Additional top-ranked CEOs include Apple CEO Tim Cook, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerburg, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and Starbucks CEO Howard D. Schultz.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, March 29, 2013; Image: US Navy View post tag: News by topiclast_img read more

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MIT to offer free online course

first_imgMore than 500,000 lectures are available for free download on the iTunesU Service. Oxford currently has more content on service than any other UK university, and has the number one global chart podcast from the series ‘Building a business.’ Oxford’s iTunesU has more than 3,000 published items and more than 100,000 downloads per week, with some tutors having recorded an entire lecture series. The site also features public lectures, talks at Oxford’s annual alumni weekend, interviews with researchers about their work and interviews with our students about their Oxford experience.University of Oxford’s Open Spires project has harnessed technology to release hundreds of hours of Oxford lectures online to benefit learners and teachers all over the world. Academics are giving away their content as open resources under a creative commons license. This is one of the largest open education projects in the UK and places Oxford alongside MIT, Yale and Berkeley as leading research institutions who make learning materials available for free.Oxford’s Department for Continuing Education began offering online courses in January 2004, and there are now 58 short online courses available. Courses are repeated each year, meaning 150 courses are provided per year, on average. The courses have attracted 2500 students so far this year (2011 – 12).The Department gives careful thought to the subjects in which to develop short online courses, ensuring they fit within a coherent and balanced portfolio which offers students choice and variety within the available subject disciplines. The range of courses currently available is weighted towards the Humanities, in which the Department has an established reputation. The provision of Economics, Mathematics, Natural and Environmental Science, Politics and Psychology courses is being expanded, not only in response to student demand in these areas but as academic staff in the wider University wish to extend their scholarship to the medium of online teaching and learning.Oxford’s new Certificate in Higher Education is equivalent to one year of full-time undergraduate study at first year level. Students can use the credit that they obtain from online coruses to count towards gaining an award from the University. The course is now accepting applications and will begin in autumn of 2012. There are nine subject areas to choose from : Archaeology, Art, History, Architectural History, History, Italian, Literature, Creative Writing, Philosophy, or Spanish. One of the world’s leading universities, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), has announced its first free course which can be studied and assessed online.The course, 6.002x: Circuits and Electronics, which will begin in March, is an electronics course that is the first prototype of an online project, known as MITx. It is anticipated to take 10 hours per week, finishing in June.Despite the current existence of online degree courses, the project represents major progress in the use of technology to deliver higher education. Students worldwide can study for a MIT certificate, without any entrance requirements or cost.The university has mentioned that it would like MITx to ‘shatter barriers to education’. A spokesman also mentioned that the course is not a ‘watered down’ version of the campus course or ‘any less intense’.The prototype is dependent on an ‘honour code’ in which students commit to behaving honestly. However, mechanisms to check identity will be implemented.The provost of the university has commented that they are looking to experiment to discover what can be delivered by online courses and what needs traditional face-to-face interaction. MIT have commented that they can only teach a fraction of those who would like to study at the university, and the course allows them to reach a much larger number of students.Courses in other subjects such as maths and biology are to be introduced subsequently.A spokesman for Oxford University commented that Oxford’s own e-learning and online provision is ‘certainly among the most forward-looking in the UK in terms of open educational offerings.’‘It is worth noting first and foremost that undergraduate courses at Oxford cannot be replicated or replaced by open educational offerings such as iTunes U because at Oxford teaching is focused on the tutorial where one or two students meet a tutor to discuss subjects in depth.’last_img read more

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Challenge to alcohol permit presents issue of first impression

first_imgJennifer Nelson for www.theindianalawyer.comA liquor store seeking to challenge the type of alcohol permit awarded to a Hamilton County specialty food store does not have standing to pursue judicial review under the Administrative Orders and Procedures Act, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled in a first impression case.21st Amendment Inc. objected at a hearing held by the Hamilton County Local Alcoholic Beverage Board in which Grapevine Cottage, a local specialty food shop that also sold alcohol, sought to renew and transfer its license. Grapevine holds a Type 115 grocery store alcoholic beverage permit; 21st Amendment has a Type 217 package store alcoholic beverage permit. It claimed most of Grapevine’s sales were in alcohol so it should have to hold a different permit and that granting Grapevine’s request would dilute 21st Amendment’s permit.21st Amendment claimed it had a statutory right to bring an action to abate the sale of alcohol that constitutes a nuisance. The Indiana Alcohol & Tobacco Commission denied its petition to intervene, leading to the liquor store to file a verified petition for judicial review under AOPA. 21st Amendment claimed it had standing because it is a “permittee with a statutory right to abate a nuisance.” The commission filed a motion to dismiss, claiming 21st Amendment is barred from seeking judicial review under law, or lacks standing to do so. The trial court found the liquor store couldn’t seek to abate the public nuisance on a petition for judicial review and gave it 30 days to file a separate amended complaint on that issue.“At issue in this case is Indiana Code section 4-21.5-5-3(a)(3), which accords standing for judicial review if the party has ‘standing under a law applicable to the final agency action.’ While our courts have previously decided standing questions under the other subsections of the statute, it appears that our courts have not yet had occasion to address standing under Indiana Code section 4-21.5-5-3(a)(3),” Judge Patricia Riley wrote.“We agree with 21st Amendment to the extent that a party with ‘standing under a law applicable to the final agency action’ is not obligated to pursue relief under the separate statute; rather, judicial review under the AOPA is appropriate in those situations. I.C. § 4-21.5-5-3(a)(3). Here, however, we cannot say that the Commission’s issuance of an alcoholic beverage permit constitutes a final agency action to which the public nuisance laws apply,” she continued.“Rather, as the public nuisance statutes establish, it is the conduct of the permittee (i.e., Grapevine Cottage) or conduct otherwise carried on in premises where alcoholic beverages are kept/sold that may give rise to a public nuisance claim. See I.C. §§ 7.1-2-6-1; -2. As the alleged nuisance is not the result of the agency’s action, but rather the subsequent conduct of the permittee, 21st Amendment does not have standing under Indiana Code section 4-21.5-5-3(a)(3) of the AOPA. As the trial court found, 21st Amendment’s statutory right to abate and enjoin a public nuisance for improper alcohol sales must be achieved through a separate nuisance action.”The case is 21st Amendment, Inc. v. Indiana Alcohol & Tobacco Commission, 49A05-1612-PL-2863. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Aryzta’s growth shrinks in Europe

first_imgZurich-based speciality bakery Aryzta has seen its Food Europe division shrink as growth falls by 1.4% in the nine months to 25 April 2009Its Food North America and Food Developing Markets both experienced growth or 22.7% and 14.9% respectively, resulting in an overall growth of 5.7% for its food businesses.Group revenue for Food Europe stood at €848.9m, with volumes declining in the UK and Irish marketplace.Chief executive officer Owen Killian said: “Consumer sentiment continued to deteriorate resulting in lower consumer spending in most channels.”He said that revenue growth has slowed in all markets, but that the company “is very well positioned with product, channel and geographic diversity combined with a very responsive business model.”last_img

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Indiana Department of Insurance provides tips for enrolling in marketplace coverage

first_img Previous articlePolice discover drugs, stolen property during search of Cass County homeNext articleBerrien County Sheriff’s Office warns residents to avoid scam calls Brooklyne Beatty WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Indiana Department of Insurance provides tips for enrolling in marketplace coverage Google+ Twitter WhatsApp By Brooklyne Beatty – November 18, 2020 0 210 center_img IndianaLocalNews TAGS2021coveragehealth insurancehealthcareindiana department of insurancemarketplaceopen enrollmenttips (Public Domain) The open enrollment period for 2021 health insurance coverage is happening now, and the Indiana Department of Insurance has a few tips to help guide you through the process.Those who currently have marketplace coverage, or will need it in 2021, should make time to shop for plans through Healthcare.gov.If you already have coverage through a marketplace plan, review your information to make sure it’s accurate. You can update your application with any income and/or household changes.The NAICs Health Insurance Shopping Tool is also available to help Hoosiers understand how different policies support specific health care needs.If you’re looking for a new plan, there are three categories of health insurance plans to choose from – Bronze, Silver and Gold. They’re broken up by how costs are shared between your and your insurer. Learn more by clicking here.If you need assistance, a certified Indiana navigator can help with the process to apply for health insurance free of charge. You can find a navigator in your area by clicking here.The open enrollment period ends on December 15, 2020. Pinterest Facebook Pinterest Google+last_img read more

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The Bakery Project Part 5: Selecting A Product Range

first_imgIn part five of the Bakery Project, we explore how to develop and adapt ranges to maximise salesThe shining stars of any bakery are its products. Customers live for the sight – and smell – of rows of freshly-baked loaves, cakes and buns, so ensuring you stock a good range of products is vital.This, inevitably, varies from bakery to bakery and even locations within the same company. So how do you decide on the bread and butter of your business? Should loaves take centre stage, or is the spotlight reserved for something sweeter? And, with what’s in fashion forever changing, how do you stay relevant?A selection of breads, traditional cakes and treats such as brownies are likely to make an appearance in most portfolios, but think carefully about the occasions for which customers will visit the bakery.“There are a few items that are automatic, especially if they are trying to attract breakfast customers,” believes Terry Morgan, director at London’s Debaere, which provides pastries and desserts to coffee shops, retailers and bakeries.“Croissants and Danish pastries are always a good start in this instance, then we try to look at creating a good mix of products for them to draw from so they can always have a staple, such as Victoria sponge, and then have specials from time to time.”Bristol-based Pinkmans needed a menu that could work for breakfast, lunch, afternoon and through to the evening.“The concept was an all-day menu based around bread-making and baking and the oven,” says Steven Whibley, co-founder of the bakery. “This gave us a good range, but also kept a purity to the menu. The challenge was to combine three kitchen sections – bread, patisserie and savoury – so they complemented each other.”Items on Pinkmans’ menu include slow-fermentation sourdoughs – white, country cob, seeded sour and baguettes – with a heavy focus on toast and bacon sandwiches at breakfast alongside sweeter items such as brioches. Filled focaccia and ciabatta complement soups and stews at lunch, with traditional afternoon tea fare served later.“We felt the evenings needed a simple idea to work – ‘it’s pizza!’. With ovens and dough-making being central and most of the ingredients already in the menu, it was not a big stretch,” he adds.Just because something doesn’t fit into the workflow of your kitchen, doesn’t mean you can’t sell it. Many bakers opt to buy in lines from specialists rather than shell out on new equipment or dedicate the time to producing certain items. This is also a good option for those catering to specialist diets, such as gluten free, which is regulated strictly (see box out p26).%%Quote_32%%“Croissants and Danish pastries are much easier to source as they take a long time to make,” adds Morgan. “Typically –with mixing, shaping, proving, baking and cooling – they can take up to 12 hours. Also, a lot of cafés have limited kitchen space, so buying in complete products makes sense.”Reading-based Warings Bakery, which was established in 1932, buys in hot savoury pies and sausage rolls.“This is purely due to production restraints as we neither have the facilities nor equipment to produce in accordance with the law,” explains Daniel Carr, PR manager at Warings.For Joe’s Bakery in Bristol, meat savoury pastries are by far the largest group of bought-in products. They come from a variety of suppliers, offering consumers different price points, and most are bought frozen raw, then baked-off in the shop.“We use Warrens for our Cornish pasties and Penny Lane Foods for sausage rolls and savoury slices. Premium pies and sausage rolls are purchased from a local butcher who has recently established a pie and sausage roll facility. These are starting to sell very well, even though they are sold at premium prices,” explains Martin Hunt of Joe’s Bakery.Products from Clark’s Pies, a long-established Bristol pie bakery, are also stocked, alongside bhajis and samosas purchased fresh from a local supplier, which Hunt believes differentiates it from the supermarkets.“Our shop is situated in an area with a wide-ranging customer base and our bought-in product range reflects that mix,” he says. “Most of the savouries are eaten out of home and we have a large number of customers who buy daily or very frequently. In order to help prevent menu boredom, we offer a wide range of products and price marks, including a very competitive meal deal.”Another way to prevent menu boredom is to innovate. But knowing which trends to tap can be tricky as there’s a careful balance to be struck between weird and wonderful and just plain weird.“Innovation needs to be built into the structure of the business for it to work,” explains Whibley. Because of this, Pinkmans has many seasonal and monthly variations of basic items, such as doughnuts, sweet tarts and special breads. “We thinks it’s important to give the customer a mix of changing items and steadfast classics,” Whibley adds.Warings, meanwhile, considers all of its NPD to be a temporary addition to the range unless the sales convince otherwise. “We never consider a new product to be a permanent line,” says Carr. “Instead it’s used to enhance the range, add interest, offer an alternative, reflect the seasons and, hopefully, encourage additional impulse sales. If a product proves very popular, then we may decide to add it permanently, for example our Mars Bar slice which is now one of our best-sellers.”This method also has other benefits, notes Hunt from Joe’s Bakery. “Suitable products are put on sale as a ‘special’ or ‘seasonal’, or sometimes included in one of our national or British regional months. This gives us the opportunity to withdraw the line if it is not too successful without it looking like a failure,” he says. “A decision is then made on whether to carry on producing the line and whether it should be a daily, two/three-times a week or as a weekend special.”Hunt suggests monitoring trends across a variety of mediums, whether TV shows, newspaper supplements, social media or by getting out and about. The street food scene, in particular, is lucrative when it comes to recipe inspiration.Maximising information from food ingredients manufacturers and suppliers, he adds, is also valuable as they can provide a wider view of the market and trends within it and help deliver products in keeping with them. He advises bakers to also look at the trends impacting the wider food and drink market, particularly health-based ones, as, in many cases, it’s only a matter of time before it influences the bakery market.%%Quote_33%%It’s not always a case of looking for the next new thing, either. “Quite a lot of the time we find that it’s old favourites making a comeback, a forgotten star of the past or for nostalgia,” says Warings’ Carr. “Of course, for us that’s great, we can just dust off one of our tried-and-tested recipes and hit the ground running.”Not all trends are equal and some won’t have the longevity that has been seen with cupcakes, premium doughnuts and even unicorns. Monitor your sales, advises Whibley, adding that any products selling under 10 a day would be under scrutiny.“Normally, we monitor the sales of products that are in decline and either try to revitalise sales by making improvements, or we may put it on sale just two or three times a week,” says Hunt, noting it comes down to old-fashioned judgement.While profitability is crucial, not all lines have to sell like hot cakes.“We will sometimes continue to produce a slow-selling line if it provides benefits other than simply profit. Such benefits may be breads that have a ‘wow’ factor when on display, or breads that appeal to members of particular nationalities who come in for their own ‘national’ bread, but spend good money on other products as well,” says Hunt.Speak to your customers, find out what they want, adapt and deliver. Bean counting: the value of a good coffee offerBrits down 95 million cups of coffee daily in the UK, according to the British Coffee Association, so little wonder hot beverages are an important  part of most bakery retailers’ offer.“Consumers want the convenience of a one-stop shop to be able to get their food and drink at the same time,” says Daniel Carr, PR manager at Warings Bakery, Reading.Coffee and tea are an essential part of any eat-in offer, believes Steven Whibley, founder of  Bristol’s PInkmans Bakery. “Having a beverage offer to match the quality of the food menu was always a key part of our concept,” he says, adding that his business is also seeing strong growth in sales of fruit and veg juices produced on-site.Hot beverages can boost local sourcing credentials, with Sussex bakery business Foodhaven buying from a local roastery. Bristol-based Joe’s Bakery uses a well-established local coffee roaster, Brian Wogan, to match the quality of the large number of nearby coffee shops.“Until last year we used a different supplier and a beans-to-cup machine, but realised that we had to up our game,” explains owner Martin Hunt.“We didn’t hesitate to go to Wogan [Coffee] for a barista-style machine and coffee. They provided us with excellent help, guidance and training, as well as great coffee, of course.”Being trained in the art of coffee-making is becoming an increasingly integral skill as competition in the coffee market grows, says Barry Kither, away-from-home sales and marketing director at Lavazza UK.He adds, however, that technology means it is now possible to serve barista-quality coffee without employing barista-qualified staff. Capsule-based solutions – the fastest-growing part of the Lavazza offer – means business can offer consistent quality in a cost-effective way, he claims.“In addition to this, the equipment Lavazza supplies has a temperature-controlled steam arm, which is a key element for non-specialists in the coffee sector as the milk foaming element is a tricky skill to master,” says Kither.Warings Bakery is currently sourcing a new supplier for its coffee and machines, a process it is taking great care with. “It’s a long process, as I’m finding out, with copious amounts of coffee drinking. Coffee is still on-trend and consumers know what they like,” says Carr.“We want to find a company that has the same values as ourselves and mirrors the care and quality of its product and services as we do.” 21st century snacking: popcorn, fruit and premium crispsSnacks have come a long way from shoppers grabbing a packet of salt and vinegar crisps to go with their lunchtime sausage roll.While there is still a role for standard crisps in the traditional popular flavours, snacking is being transformed by trends that are also impacting the wider bakery market: health and premiumisation.Vhari Russell, founder of The Food Marketing expert, suggests bakers offer a variety of products, such as popcorn, crisps, fruit snacks, and fruit.“It would be great to ensure you offer something different to stand out, and source locally if you can,” she says, advising businesses should avoid large minimum orders and consider using a distributor to reduce administration.Quality and provenance of ingredients has become all-important, according to Katy Hamblin, marketing manager of Pipers Crisps. “Consumers are actively seeking great-tasting snacks in preference to mediocre, commonplace fare whenever there’s a choice.The good news is that consumers are willing to pay more for the right snack. “For them, it’s not about the price; much more important is the value they get from the quality of the food and the brand itself,” says Hamblin. “This is excellent news for bakers and café owners as it creates an opportunity to make a real point of difference by premiumising your offer.”When it comes to health, Britain’s biggest crisps brand, Walkers, is tapping the trend with launches such as Sunbites Nut Mixes, containing dried fruit and nuts, as well as seasoned nut mixes, and Snack-a-Jacks mini rice cakes.Pipers, meanwhile, recently launched Pipers Crispeas, based on British peas that are naturally low in calories and a source of protein and fibre. “It is a must to offer healthier lines and products specific to kids,” says Russell. “It is important to offer variety and products to encourage healthier living.”Sales will be driven by stocking brands with a strong shelf presence, say suppliers.“Eye-catching packaging backed up by a dependable brand name and impeccable credentials are important,” says Hamblin, adding that branded point-of-sale materials and equipment can help to promote snacks.Russell suggests allowing shoppers to sample snacks to encourage purchase, and keeping merchandising simple, with wooden crates or baskets to display products near the counter.Rising to the challenge of gluten-freeThe gluten-free juggernaut shows no sign of slowing, with supermarket sales of gluten-free baked goods up 17.5% year-on-year in 2017 [Kantar Worldpanel]. And businesses are continuing to invest in the market, with Village Bakery just announcing development of a £12m free-from factory (see p4).But for a bakery hoping to take a slice of the burgeoning market for itself, there are major obstacles.“The problem with gluten-free products is that wheat gives you everything you need for baking,” says Małgorzata Gieblewicz, marketing manager at The Polish Bakery, adding that ensuring taste and quality were not compromised was a priority for the business when it expanded into gluten-free goods.“The process of gluten-free baking is much more complicated, so there is a technical challenge. To achieve similar results you need a mixture of starch, proteins and gluten-free flour, and finding the best possible certified suppliers was a time-consuming process.”As for the issue of cross-contamination with gluten-containing goods and ingredients, The Polish Bakery opted to produce its free-from bread in a separate facility, as many manufacturers do. In addition, the business has segregated storage areas, invested in specialist training for staff producing the free-from goods, and undertakes regular testing.Gail’s Bakery also has a dedicated facility for its gluten-free sourdough. The business adds that getting a good crust and great taste has proved difficult but has been achieved by using a blend of gluten-free flours.For many businesses, sourcing gluten-free products from a third party is the solution to catering for special dietary needs.“Our bought-in items include gluten-free bread and confectionery from a local family bakery with a specialist production room,” explains Martin Hunt of Joe’s Bakery in Bristol.But gluten-free isn’t for every business, as attested by Daniel Carr of Warings Bakery.“We have tried, on several occasions, to tap into the gluten-free market, but as we’re unable to produce this ourselves, we had to buy in product,” he says.“After several attempts, we came to the conclusion that consumers don’t consider their local family bakers on the high street as a gluten-free specialist, choosing dedicated gluten-free cafés, delis and bakeries or online retailers instead.”last_img read more

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Watch Kyle Hollingsworth Hula-Hoop With His Daughters During String Cheese Incident’s Red Rocks Closer

first_imgLast week, the String Cheese Incident returned to the legendary Morrison, Colorado venue Red Rocks Amphitheatre for three nights, capping off their highly anticipated seven-night run across their home state of Colorado. Across the group’s time at Red Rocks, the String Cheese Incident welcomed plenty of friends to join them onstage including Lyle Divinsky of The Motet, David Satori of Beats Antique, JJ Grey, Ruby Chase, Bonnie Paine (formerly) of Elephant Revival, and members of The Main Squeeze and Rising Appalachia.However, while the String Cheese Incident’s annual Red Rocks run serves as a jubilant Colorado homecoming for SCI fans, it’s clear the band feels the same way. The band’s roots are firmly planted in little mountain ski towns, such as Telluride and Crested Butte, and the group has made Colorado its home for over a quarter-century. With Red Rocks acting as a home base for the weekend, members of String Cheese Incident celebrate their yearly return to Morrison with families, in addition to their friends.The band highlighted their family in a special way during their female-heavy Red Rocks closer last Sunday. To close the show, Bill Nershi‘s wife, Jillian Nershi, joined String Cheese Incident along with Bonnie Paine and members of Rising Appalachia teaming for a bust-out of widely recorded gospel standard, “I’ll Fly Away”. However, other band family members got their moment to shine as well, with keyboardist Kyle Hollingworth‘s kids coming out and hula-hooping with their dad during set two’s “Round The Wheel”.In a newly posted video, String Cheese Incident shared this heartwarming, kid-friendly moment with their fans. As Hollingsworth noted in a statement about the clip, “Before joining the band, I had no idea how to hula hoop. [Michael] Kang and the gang whipped me into shape right away. It was so much fun to hoop with my daughters at Red Rocks, they were amazing!” Watch the video below:Kyle Hollingsworth Hula-Hoops with His Daughters at Red Rocks[Video: The String Cheese Incident]Next up for The String Cheese Incident is their highly anticipated, three-night headlining stint at the inaugural Waterloo Music Festival in Austin, TX. For a full list of SCI’s upcoming shows, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

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Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Breaking Boundaries, Creating Solutions | One Harvard

first_imgInnovation and Entrepreneurship, a general education course at Harvard, harnesses undergraduate interest in socially conscious business by allowing them to tap into Harvard Business School faculty and the innovation lab’s (ilab) resources. It brings the faculty and case teaching methods of Harvard Business School to undergraduates from a range of disciplines.last_img

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Historic Notre Dame superstitions still honored today

first_imgIf you ask Notre Dame students, alumni or fans what makes this community so beloved, it is likely you’ll hear a recurring term: tradition. These traditions — whether it’s a dorm event, such as the Fisher Regatta, or singing the Alma Mater after football games — are crucial to the Notre Dame experience. Embedded in this culture of tradition at Notre Dame are some bizarre superstitions that have been passed down verbally for generations.When students come for a campus tour at Notre Dame or begin their first year on campus as a student, they learn about many of these superstitions. Undergraduate students are warned not to ascend the front stairs to the entrance of the main building; they must wait until graduation to climb these steps. Incoming students, according to superstition, are forbidden to walk on the God Quad grass, otherwise they will fail their freshman theology class — a course required for all students. Additionally, there are the “Ring by Spring” superstitions. Those seeking to be proposed to by the spring semester of their senior year are familiar with the idea that if they kiss their significant other beneath the Lyons Hall arch and walk counter-clockwise around the lakes holding their hands, then the couple will get married. But where did these traditions come from? Do current students wane on the side of caution and follow them?Given that many of these traditions have been passed down verbally since the inception of Notre Dame, it is difficult to say when exactly the superstition started and who started it. Some origins, including the Main Building steps, have been documented by the Notre Dame community. Fr. Thomas Blantz, a retired Notre Dame priest, knows of these superstitions but said he has never before looked into their origins.“About the Main Building steps, I just thought that since at one time that was about while the University President, Vice President, and other administrators lived there, they probably spent evenings and other periods relaxing on that beautiful porch, with the impressive view of the campus and down Notre Dame Avenue, and they did not want undergraduate students using that entrance and perhaps overhearing their conversations, occasionally private ones,” Blantz said in an email. Notre Dame’s website offers a somewhat similar explanation regarding student etiquette. This superstition “originates in 19th-century porch etiquette and smoking rituals. Only after successful completion of a degree program was a student deemed equal enough to ascend the steps and to smoke on the porch with his professors.” The Main Building and God Quad grass superstitions are two that have been passed down for generations at Notre Dame and are still honored by current students.“My grandfather taught me about the Main Building steps and not to step on God Quad, but since he attended Notre Dame in 1962, when there were only male students at the school, there were more traditions that no longer exist,” junior Darby West said.Many students know about the superstitions regarding the Lyons Arch and lake walk. There may be no answer to when that theory began, but some Notre Dame couples have become engaged after participating in this romantic ritual, even in recent years. Regardless of where all the famous superstitions surrounding famous sites on Notre Dame’s campus come from, one important sentiment remains: Tradition is hugely important at this University. “One of our older priests used to say that if something happened once on campus, it was a tradition,” Blantz said in an email. “Thus, someone may have failed a theology class and then remembered he earlier had walked on that grass, or someone may have kissed a young woman under the Lyons arch and eventually married her, and thus a tradition started.” Tags: God quad, Ring by Spring, superstitionslast_img read more

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