Aryzta’s growth shrinks in Europe

first_imgZurich-based speciality bakery Aryzta has seen its Food Europe division shrink as growth falls by 1.4% in the nine months to 25 April 2009Its Food North America and Food Developing Markets both experienced growth or 22.7% and 14.9% respectively, resulting in an overall growth of 5.7% for its food businesses.Group revenue for Food Europe stood at €848.9m, with volumes declining in the UK and Irish marketplace.Chief executive officer Owen Killian said: “Consumer sentiment continued to deteriorate resulting in lower consumer spending in most channels.”He said that revenue growth has slowed in all markets, but that the company “is very well positioned with product, channel and geographic diversity combined with a very responsive business model.”last_img

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Indiana Department of Insurance provides tips for enrolling in marketplace coverage

first_img Previous articlePolice discover drugs, stolen property during search of Cass County homeNext articleBerrien County Sheriff’s Office warns residents to avoid scam calls Brooklyne Beatty WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Indiana Department of Insurance provides tips for enrolling in marketplace coverage Google+ Twitter WhatsApp By Brooklyne Beatty – November 18, 2020 0 210 center_img IndianaLocalNews TAGS2021coveragehealth insurancehealthcareindiana department of insurancemarketplaceopen enrollmenttips (Public Domain) The open enrollment period for 2021 health insurance coverage is happening now, and the Indiana Department of Insurance has a few tips to help guide you through the process.Those who currently have marketplace coverage, or will need it in 2021, should make time to shop for plans through Healthcare.gov.If you already have coverage through a marketplace plan, review your information to make sure it’s accurate. You can update your application with any income and/or household changes.The NAICs Health Insurance Shopping Tool is also available to help Hoosiers understand how different policies support specific health care needs.If you’re looking for a new plan, there are three categories of health insurance plans to choose from – Bronze, Silver and Gold. They’re broken up by how costs are shared between your and your insurer. Learn more by clicking here.If you need assistance, a certified Indiana navigator can help with the process to apply for health insurance free of charge. You can find a navigator in your area by clicking here.The open enrollment period ends on December 15, 2020. Pinterest Facebook Pinterest Google+last_img read more

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The Bakery Project Part 5: Selecting A Product Range

first_imgIn part five of the Bakery Project, we explore how to develop and adapt ranges to maximise salesThe shining stars of any bakery are its products. Customers live for the sight – and smell – of rows of freshly-baked loaves, cakes and buns, so ensuring you stock a good range of products is vital.This, inevitably, varies from bakery to bakery and even locations within the same company. So how do you decide on the bread and butter of your business? Should loaves take centre stage, or is the spotlight reserved for something sweeter? And, with what’s in fashion forever changing, how do you stay relevant?A selection of breads, traditional cakes and treats such as brownies are likely to make an appearance in most portfolios, but think carefully about the occasions for which customers will visit the bakery.“There are a few items that are automatic, especially if they are trying to attract breakfast customers,” believes Terry Morgan, director at London’s Debaere, which provides pastries and desserts to coffee shops, retailers and bakeries.“Croissants and Danish pastries are always a good start in this instance, then we try to look at creating a good mix of products for them to draw from so they can always have a staple, such as Victoria sponge, and then have specials from time to time.”Bristol-based Pinkmans needed a menu that could work for breakfast, lunch, afternoon and through to the evening.“The concept was an all-day menu based around bread-making and baking and the oven,” says Steven Whibley, co-founder of the bakery. “This gave us a good range, but also kept a purity to the menu. The challenge was to combine three kitchen sections – bread, patisserie and savoury – so they complemented each other.”Items on Pinkmans’ menu include slow-fermentation sourdoughs – white, country cob, seeded sour and baguettes – with a heavy focus on toast and bacon sandwiches at breakfast alongside sweeter items such as brioches. Filled focaccia and ciabatta complement soups and stews at lunch, with traditional afternoon tea fare served later.“We felt the evenings needed a simple idea to work – ‘it’s pizza!’. With ovens and dough-making being central and most of the ingredients already in the menu, it was not a big stretch,” he adds.Just because something doesn’t fit into the workflow of your kitchen, doesn’t mean you can’t sell it. Many bakers opt to buy in lines from specialists rather than shell out on new equipment or dedicate the time to producing certain items. This is also a good option for those catering to specialist diets, such as gluten free, which is regulated strictly (see box out p26).%%Quote_32%%“Croissants and Danish pastries are much easier to source as they take a long time to make,” adds Morgan. “Typically –with mixing, shaping, proving, baking and cooling – they can take up to 12 hours. Also, a lot of cafés have limited kitchen space, so buying in complete products makes sense.”Reading-based Warings Bakery, which was established in 1932, buys in hot savoury pies and sausage rolls.“This is purely due to production restraints as we neither have the facilities nor equipment to produce in accordance with the law,” explains Daniel Carr, PR manager at Warings.For Joe’s Bakery in Bristol, meat savoury pastries are by far the largest group of bought-in products. They come from a variety of suppliers, offering consumers different price points, and most are bought frozen raw, then baked-off in the shop.“We use Warrens for our Cornish pasties and Penny Lane Foods for sausage rolls and savoury slices. Premium pies and sausage rolls are purchased from a local butcher who has recently established a pie and sausage roll facility. These are starting to sell very well, even though they are sold at premium prices,” explains Martin Hunt of Joe’s Bakery.Products from Clark’s Pies, a long-established Bristol pie bakery, are also stocked, alongside bhajis and samosas purchased fresh from a local supplier, which Hunt believes differentiates it from the supermarkets.“Our shop is situated in an area with a wide-ranging customer base and our bought-in product range reflects that mix,” he says. “Most of the savouries are eaten out of home and we have a large number of customers who buy daily or very frequently. In order to help prevent menu boredom, we offer a wide range of products and price marks, including a very competitive meal deal.”Another way to prevent menu boredom is to innovate. But knowing which trends to tap can be tricky as there’s a careful balance to be struck between weird and wonderful and just plain weird.“Innovation needs to be built into the structure of the business for it to work,” explains Whibley. Because of this, Pinkmans has many seasonal and monthly variations of basic items, such as doughnuts, sweet tarts and special breads. “We thinks it’s important to give the customer a mix of changing items and steadfast classics,” Whibley adds.Warings, meanwhile, considers all of its NPD to be a temporary addition to the range unless the sales convince otherwise. “We never consider a new product to be a permanent line,” says Carr. “Instead it’s used to enhance the range, add interest, offer an alternative, reflect the seasons and, hopefully, encourage additional impulse sales. If a product proves very popular, then we may decide to add it permanently, for example our Mars Bar slice which is now one of our best-sellers.”This method also has other benefits, notes Hunt from Joe’s Bakery. “Suitable products are put on sale as a ‘special’ or ‘seasonal’, or sometimes included in one of our national or British regional months. This gives us the opportunity to withdraw the line if it is not too successful without it looking like a failure,” he says. “A decision is then made on whether to carry on producing the line and whether it should be a daily, two/three-times a week or as a weekend special.”Hunt suggests monitoring trends across a variety of mediums, whether TV shows, newspaper supplements, social media or by getting out and about. The street food scene, in particular, is lucrative when it comes to recipe inspiration.Maximising information from food ingredients manufacturers and suppliers, he adds, is also valuable as they can provide a wider view of the market and trends within it and help deliver products in keeping with them. He advises bakers to also look at the trends impacting the wider food and drink market, particularly health-based ones, as, in many cases, it’s only a matter of time before it influences the bakery market.%%Quote_33%%It’s not always a case of looking for the next new thing, either. “Quite a lot of the time we find that it’s old favourites making a comeback, a forgotten star of the past or for nostalgia,” says Warings’ Carr. “Of course, for us that’s great, we can just dust off one of our tried-and-tested recipes and hit the ground running.”Not all trends are equal and some won’t have the longevity that has been seen with cupcakes, premium doughnuts and even unicorns. Monitor your sales, advises Whibley, adding that any products selling under 10 a day would be under scrutiny.“Normally, we monitor the sales of products that are in decline and either try to revitalise sales by making improvements, or we may put it on sale just two or three times a week,” says Hunt, noting it comes down to old-fashioned judgement.While profitability is crucial, not all lines have to sell like hot cakes.“We will sometimes continue to produce a slow-selling line if it provides benefits other than simply profit. Such benefits may be breads that have a ‘wow’ factor when on display, or breads that appeal to members of particular nationalities who come in for their own ‘national’ bread, but spend good money on other products as well,” says Hunt.Speak to your customers, find out what they want, adapt and deliver. Bean counting: the value of a good coffee offerBrits down 95 million cups of coffee daily in the UK, according to the British Coffee Association, so little wonder hot beverages are an important  part of most bakery retailers’ offer.“Consumers want the convenience of a one-stop shop to be able to get their food and drink at the same time,” says Daniel Carr, PR manager at Warings Bakery, Reading.Coffee and tea are an essential part of any eat-in offer, believes Steven Whibley, founder of  Bristol’s PInkmans Bakery. “Having a beverage offer to match the quality of the food menu was always a key part of our concept,” he says, adding that his business is also seeing strong growth in sales of fruit and veg juices produced on-site.Hot beverages can boost local sourcing credentials, with Sussex bakery business Foodhaven buying from a local roastery. Bristol-based Joe’s Bakery uses a well-established local coffee roaster, Brian Wogan, to match the quality of the large number of nearby coffee shops.“Until last year we used a different supplier and a beans-to-cup machine, but realised that we had to up our game,” explains owner Martin Hunt.“We didn’t hesitate to go to Wogan [Coffee] for a barista-style machine and coffee. They provided us with excellent help, guidance and training, as well as great coffee, of course.”Being trained in the art of coffee-making is becoming an increasingly integral skill as competition in the coffee market grows, says Barry Kither, away-from-home sales and marketing director at Lavazza UK.He adds, however, that technology means it is now possible to serve barista-quality coffee without employing barista-qualified staff. Capsule-based solutions – the fastest-growing part of the Lavazza offer – means business can offer consistent quality in a cost-effective way, he claims.“In addition to this, the equipment Lavazza supplies has a temperature-controlled steam arm, which is a key element for non-specialists in the coffee sector as the milk foaming element is a tricky skill to master,” says Kither.Warings Bakery is currently sourcing a new supplier for its coffee and machines, a process it is taking great care with. “It’s a long process, as I’m finding out, with copious amounts of coffee drinking. Coffee is still on-trend and consumers know what they like,” says Carr.“We want to find a company that has the same values as ourselves and mirrors the care and quality of its product and services as we do.” 21st century snacking: popcorn, fruit and premium crispsSnacks have come a long way from shoppers grabbing a packet of salt and vinegar crisps to go with their lunchtime sausage roll.While there is still a role for standard crisps in the traditional popular flavours, snacking is being transformed by trends that are also impacting the wider bakery market: health and premiumisation.Vhari Russell, founder of The Food Marketing expert, suggests bakers offer a variety of products, such as popcorn, crisps, fruit snacks, and fruit.“It would be great to ensure you offer something different to stand out, and source locally if you can,” she says, advising businesses should avoid large minimum orders and consider using a distributor to reduce administration.Quality and provenance of ingredients has become all-important, according to Katy Hamblin, marketing manager of Pipers Crisps. “Consumers are actively seeking great-tasting snacks in preference to mediocre, commonplace fare whenever there’s a choice.The good news is that consumers are willing to pay more for the right snack. “For them, it’s not about the price; much more important is the value they get from the quality of the food and the brand itself,” says Hamblin. “This is excellent news for bakers and café owners as it creates an opportunity to make a real point of difference by premiumising your offer.”When it comes to health, Britain’s biggest crisps brand, Walkers, is tapping the trend with launches such as Sunbites Nut Mixes, containing dried fruit and nuts, as well as seasoned nut mixes, and Snack-a-Jacks mini rice cakes.Pipers, meanwhile, recently launched Pipers Crispeas, based on British peas that are naturally low in calories and a source of protein and fibre. “It is a must to offer healthier lines and products specific to kids,” says Russell. “It is important to offer variety and products to encourage healthier living.”Sales will be driven by stocking brands with a strong shelf presence, say suppliers.“Eye-catching packaging backed up by a dependable brand name and impeccable credentials are important,” says Hamblin, adding that branded point-of-sale materials and equipment can help to promote snacks.Russell suggests allowing shoppers to sample snacks to encourage purchase, and keeping merchandising simple, with wooden crates or baskets to display products near the counter.Rising to the challenge of gluten-freeThe gluten-free juggernaut shows no sign of slowing, with supermarket sales of gluten-free baked goods up 17.5% year-on-year in 2017 [Kantar Worldpanel]. And businesses are continuing to invest in the market, with Village Bakery just announcing development of a £12m free-from factory (see p4).But for a bakery hoping to take a slice of the burgeoning market for itself, there are major obstacles.“The problem with gluten-free products is that wheat gives you everything you need for baking,” says Małgorzata Gieblewicz, marketing manager at The Polish Bakery, adding that ensuring taste and quality were not compromised was a priority for the business when it expanded into gluten-free goods.“The process of gluten-free baking is much more complicated, so there is a technical challenge. To achieve similar results you need a mixture of starch, proteins and gluten-free flour, and finding the best possible certified suppliers was a time-consuming process.”As for the issue of cross-contamination with gluten-containing goods and ingredients, The Polish Bakery opted to produce its free-from bread in a separate facility, as many manufacturers do. In addition, the business has segregated storage areas, invested in specialist training for staff producing the free-from goods, and undertakes regular testing.Gail’s Bakery also has a dedicated facility for its gluten-free sourdough. The business adds that getting a good crust and great taste has proved difficult but has been achieved by using a blend of gluten-free flours.For many businesses, sourcing gluten-free products from a third party is the solution to catering for special dietary needs.“Our bought-in items include gluten-free bread and confectionery from a local family bakery with a specialist production room,” explains Martin Hunt of Joe’s Bakery in Bristol.But gluten-free isn’t for every business, as attested by Daniel Carr of Warings Bakery.“We have tried, on several occasions, to tap into the gluten-free market, but as we’re unable to produce this ourselves, we had to buy in product,” he says.“After several attempts, we came to the conclusion that consumers don’t consider their local family bakers on the high street as a gluten-free specialist, choosing dedicated gluten-free cafés, delis and bakeries or online retailers instead.”last_img read more

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Watch Kyle Hollingsworth Hula-Hoop With His Daughters During String Cheese Incident’s Red Rocks Closer

first_imgLast week, the String Cheese Incident returned to the legendary Morrison, Colorado venue Red Rocks Amphitheatre for three nights, capping off their highly anticipated seven-night run across their home state of Colorado. Across the group’s time at Red Rocks, the String Cheese Incident welcomed plenty of friends to join them onstage including Lyle Divinsky of The Motet, David Satori of Beats Antique, JJ Grey, Ruby Chase, Bonnie Paine (formerly) of Elephant Revival, and members of The Main Squeeze and Rising Appalachia.However, while the String Cheese Incident’s annual Red Rocks run serves as a jubilant Colorado homecoming for SCI fans, it’s clear the band feels the same way. The band’s roots are firmly planted in little mountain ski towns, such as Telluride and Crested Butte, and the group has made Colorado its home for over a quarter-century. With Red Rocks acting as a home base for the weekend, members of String Cheese Incident celebrate their yearly return to Morrison with families, in addition to their friends.The band highlighted their family in a special way during their female-heavy Red Rocks closer last Sunday. To close the show, Bill Nershi‘s wife, Jillian Nershi, joined String Cheese Incident along with Bonnie Paine and members of Rising Appalachia teaming for a bust-out of widely recorded gospel standard, “I’ll Fly Away”. However, other band family members got their moment to shine as well, with keyboardist Kyle Hollingworth‘s kids coming out and hula-hooping with their dad during set two’s “Round The Wheel”.In a newly posted video, String Cheese Incident shared this heartwarming, kid-friendly moment with their fans. As Hollingsworth noted in a statement about the clip, “Before joining the band, I had no idea how to hula hoop. [Michael] Kang and the gang whipped me into shape right away. It was so much fun to hoop with my daughters at Red Rocks, they were amazing!” Watch the video below:Kyle Hollingsworth Hula-Hoops with His Daughters at Red Rocks[Video: The String Cheese Incident]Next up for The String Cheese Incident is their highly anticipated, three-night headlining stint at the inaugural Waterloo Music Festival in Austin, TX. For a full list of SCI’s upcoming shows, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

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Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Breaking Boundaries, Creating Solutions | One Harvard

first_imgInnovation and Entrepreneurship, a general education course at Harvard, harnesses undergraduate interest in socially conscious business by allowing them to tap into Harvard Business School faculty and the innovation lab’s (ilab) resources. It brings the faculty and case teaching methods of Harvard Business School to undergraduates from a range of disciplines.last_img

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Historic Notre Dame superstitions still honored today

first_imgIf you ask Notre Dame students, alumni or fans what makes this community so beloved, it is likely you’ll hear a recurring term: tradition. These traditions — whether it’s a dorm event, such as the Fisher Regatta, or singing the Alma Mater after football games — are crucial to the Notre Dame experience. Embedded in this culture of tradition at Notre Dame are some bizarre superstitions that have been passed down verbally for generations.When students come for a campus tour at Notre Dame or begin their first year on campus as a student, they learn about many of these superstitions. Undergraduate students are warned not to ascend the front stairs to the entrance of the main building; they must wait until graduation to climb these steps. Incoming students, according to superstition, are forbidden to walk on the God Quad grass, otherwise they will fail their freshman theology class — a course required for all students. Additionally, there are the “Ring by Spring” superstitions. Those seeking to be proposed to by the spring semester of their senior year are familiar with the idea that if they kiss their significant other beneath the Lyons Hall arch and walk counter-clockwise around the lakes holding their hands, then the couple will get married. But where did these traditions come from? Do current students wane on the side of caution and follow them?Given that many of these traditions have been passed down verbally since the inception of Notre Dame, it is difficult to say when exactly the superstition started and who started it. Some origins, including the Main Building steps, have been documented by the Notre Dame community. Fr. Thomas Blantz, a retired Notre Dame priest, knows of these superstitions but said he has never before looked into their origins.“About the Main Building steps, I just thought that since at one time that was about while the University President, Vice President, and other administrators lived there, they probably spent evenings and other periods relaxing on that beautiful porch, with the impressive view of the campus and down Notre Dame Avenue, and they did not want undergraduate students using that entrance and perhaps overhearing their conversations, occasionally private ones,” Blantz said in an email. Notre Dame’s website offers a somewhat similar explanation regarding student etiquette. This superstition “originates in 19th-century porch etiquette and smoking rituals. Only after successful completion of a degree program was a student deemed equal enough to ascend the steps and to smoke on the porch with his professors.” The Main Building and God Quad grass superstitions are two that have been passed down for generations at Notre Dame and are still honored by current students.“My grandfather taught me about the Main Building steps and not to step on God Quad, but since he attended Notre Dame in 1962, when there were only male students at the school, there were more traditions that no longer exist,” junior Darby West said.Many students know about the superstitions regarding the Lyons Arch and lake walk. There may be no answer to when that theory began, but some Notre Dame couples have become engaged after participating in this romantic ritual, even in recent years. Regardless of where all the famous superstitions surrounding famous sites on Notre Dame’s campus come from, one important sentiment remains: Tradition is hugely important at this University. “One of our older priests used to say that if something happened once on campus, it was a tradition,” Blantz said in an email. “Thus, someone may have failed a theology class and then remembered he earlier had walked on that grass, or someone may have kissed a young woman under the Lyons arch and eventually married her, and thus a tradition started.” Tags: God quad, Ring by Spring, superstitionslast_img read more

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Renewable energy advocates call for expansion of Vermont net-metering program

first_imgHomeowners, businesses, and renewable energy manufacturers, installers and developers met today to call for the expansion of Vermont’s net-metering program. At a State House press conference, members of Renewable Energy Vermont (REV), the state’s leading trade association for the renewable energy industry joined Vermont home and business owners and leadership from the House Natural Resources and Energy Committee to discuss the role of Vermont’s net-metering law in creating jobs and deploying home-grown renewable energy to Vermonters.Afterward, the group testified before the House Natural Resources and Energy Committee.‘Net metering has been a cornerstone program for Vermonters growing locally produced, renewable power,’ says REV Board Chair and VERA V.P. Martha Staskus. ‘Expanding the program will spur the development of new renewable energy systems, produce additional economic growth, and create more jobs at no cost to the state.’Net metering allows Vermont rate-payers to generate their own power using renewable energy systems. Excess power they generate can be fed back to their utilities, running their electric meters backwards. This successful program originally enacted by the Vermont Legislature in 1998 has resulted in nearly 1,300 solar, wind, and digester installations across the state with a total capacity of over 11MW of local renewable power. About Renewable Energy Vermont (REV), www.revermont.org(link is external)REV is a nonprofit, nonpartisan trade association representing nearly 300 businesses, individuals, colleges and others committed to reducing our reliance on fossil fuels and expanding the availability of renewable sources of energy in Vermont. MONTPELIER, Vermont | January 28, 2011 – ###last_img read more

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South Pacific Fishery Threatened

first_img The governments of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Chile decided at a November 2010 meeting in Quito to strengthen the PCSP. The plan called for the PCSP, which is based in Ecuador’s main port of Guayaquil, to develop a greater capacity to respond to over-fishing and climate change. The commission has developed new initiatives, Peruvian Hector Soldi, Secretary General of the PCSP, told Diálogo. One is a sustainable plan to reduce fishing pressure on the resources of the Pacific. The PCSP will work to curb fishing by industrial fishing fleets coming from as far away as Japan, Korea, China and Russia, he said. Large fishing vessels travel thousands of miles and make big catches near the exclusive economic zones of the four countries throughout the year, he said. Most affected are migratory fish species like tuna, shark and mackerel, which are vital to the economies of the region. Tuna is the third most important export product in Ecuador after oil and bananas. And tuna suffered the biggest decline of Ecuador’s exports last year. Large catches by foreign vessels deplete the resources that local fishermen can access, PCSP officials said. “Foreign fishing affects the local fishing industry. This is evident in Chile, which has diminished the amount of fishing within the exclusive economic zone. This demonstrates that there is tremendous pressure on the resources,” Soldi said. The PCSP plans to determine fishing quotas and how many foreign vessels can approach the territorial sea areas. The quotas will be based on the historical records of each country; they reveal the number of vessels that have operated in the region and their catch, according to the PCSP. The commission hopes that nations will sign agreements on sustainable fishing and agree to comply with its quotas, officials said. Major fishing powers like Japan and Norway would be subjected to closures and catch allowances, as would local fishermen. Officials will present the statement on foreign fishing, co-signed by the four South American nations, at the next meeting of the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organization. The United Nations created the SPRFMO to manage exclusive economic zones. The PCSP’s main function is to unify the policies and positions of the four countries, helping them to defend their interests internationally, Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs Sovereignty and Limits National Director Arturo Montoya said. Another function of the PCSP is to foster cooperation among its members, he said. The Marine Institute of Peru, for example, has much to contribute to neighboring countries in marine biological research, as do the research institutes in Colombia, Ecuador and Chile, Montoya said. Cooperation may be the best way to promote conservation. Caring for the marine environment poses more challenges than land conservation, said marine researcher Soledad Luna, who performs her research on the northern coast of Ecuador. “Nobody owns part of the sea, everything belongs to the state and no one overtakes the ocean to take care of it,” she said. Fishermen can be key allies for conservation, Luna said – if their economic situation is improved. “This will allow them to practice sustainable fishing and cooperate with the State in caring for the resources,” she said. Fishing is the main source of income for the inhabitants of small villages along the beaches of the Pacific in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Chile. Unsustainable fishing practices know no borders – and neither does climate change. The PCSP is responsible for coordinating the evaluation of the impacts of climate change in each country and coordinating measures when the impacts are regional, Montoya said. The General Secretariat of the PCSP has been tasked since January 2009 with improving the collection oceanographic and marine meteorological information in the South American Pacific. The climate phenomenon known as “La Nina” has caught the PCSP’s attention in recent months. The ocean current has caused severe flooding and landslides in Venezuela and Colombia, erratic behavior of the ocean and lower temperatures on the coast and in the Andes in Ecuador. “What we want is to have accurate data about what might happen. Each day we lose marine species, sea levels rise and the temperatures are unstable. We must be prepared,” Montoya said. By Dialogo February 09, 2011 Twenty years ago, fishermen on the northern coast of Ecuador harvested lobsters with their feet. All they had to do was step into the shallow, warm waters of the Galera-San Francisco Marine Reserve. They were met by huge populations of the prized crustaceans. Those days are over. Fishermen now must go offshore to harvest lobsters that are smaller and scarcer. The populations and sizes of the most coveted species throughout the South Pacific have decreased significantly. That has prompted the governments of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Chile to strengthen an old institution, the Permanent Commission of the South Pacific (PCSP). The PCSP was established 60 years ago to protect the marine resources of the region. Only 2% of lobsters caught in the equatorial Pacific are in compliance with the minimum size limit for fishing – 26 cm – according to the Nazca Studies Institute, a non-governmental organization (NGO) that conducts wildlife research. Those statistics worry regional governments. Large-scale industrial fishing and climate change are to blame for declining lobster and marine populations, said Pilar Solís, Deputy Director of the National Institute of Fisheries of Ecuador (Instituto National de Pesca de Ecuador). Changes in ocean temperatures have led to changes in the distribution and the reproduction of wildlife, she said. The figures for fish production in South American countries bordering the Pacific are startling. Chile’s production fell from 1.7 million tons to 1.5 million between 2006 and 2007. Peru’s catch totaled 9.6 million tons in 2004. That fell to 7.2 million tons in 2007, according to government figures. Fishery statistics are current only until 2007, but Solís said the situation is not improving. Local governments hope a strengthened PCSP will stop the decline. The PCSP has a long and distinguished history. It was the first international organization to advocate that each country should have sovereignty over the 200 miles of ocean closest to its coasts. The United Nations formalized that idea in 1982 when it adopted the Convention of the Law of the Sea. center_img Foreign fishing Climate change last_img read more

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Lost Not Found: How Some Missing Mentally Ill Never Return

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York WHERE DID YOU GO: Dennis Shepherd, a 47-year-old man who was reported missing from Pilgrim Psychiatric Center in Brentwood last May, hiking in Honolulu, Hawaii in happier times.Dennis Shepherd was an energetic personal assistant living with his girlfriend in Port Washington until he fell into a spiral of paranoia, suspecting everyone of conspiring with the FBI to investigate him—an imaginary probe that, like the real one to find him when he later went missing, may have ended with his demise.A year ago May 18, the 47-year-old athletic jack of all trades took off running the moment he stepped out of a vehicle from Stony Brook University Hospital’s psych unit, where he was involuntarily committed for a month. He vanished on the sprawling grounds of Pilgrim Psychiatric Center in Brentwood, where it was a good sprint across fields surrounding the complex into the neighboring woods before he was gone.Despite a Suffolk County police investigation, a search party combing the nearby 813-acre Oak Brush Plains State Preserve at Edgewood and his picture being distributed to the local news media, he’s still missing. He was delusional, repeatedly put on suicide watch and showed signs of schizophrenia shortly before he vanished, according to his medical records.A Lake Ronkonkoma resident had reported him to police after Shepherd went door-to-door asking to call the United Nations to report the “conspiracy,” which he later believed involved his neighbor, the officers who hospitalized him, the lawyer he hired to get him out and 75 percent of the hospital staff.“I want to see how I do without medications,” Shepherd told doctors who decided he needed treatment over his objections—a decision he originally planned to fight when he arrived at Pilgrim for a mental health court hearing, according to court records that show he told doctors he planned “jumping off of a bridge, jumping out of a window, and hanging himself to escape from his paranoid ideation.”Attorneys hired by his mother recently filed a notice of claim, their first step in a $5-million negligence lawsuit against Stony Brook Hospital, Shepherd’s doctors and the security staffers who oversaw his transfer. His ex-girlfriend blames Suffolk County police, saying detectives in the Missing Person’s Section—a unit that was recently redeployed among the seven precinct squads—did not request a “Golden Alert,” a newly enacted investigative tool similar to the Amber Alert signaled for missing children. The case illustrates the complexity of such searches despite advances designed to find missing persons more quickly.—Vesselin Mitev, attorney for the family of Dennis Shepherd, who went missing in Brentwood a year ago May 18.Shepherd’s case is one of more than 85,000 that the National Crime Information Center is tracking. The trail went cold on some of them four decades ago. Last year, more than 22,000 people were reported missing in New York State, according the state Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS).“The belief was that he’d come to my house because I had his car,” says Joanne Villani, 49, Shepherd’s grief-stricken ex-girlfriend of eight years, recalling how police had checked her home for signs of his return but to no avail. Villani says she picked up the car from where Shepherd had told her he hid it in Westchester when he thought the FBI was closing in, and later she returned it to his family.“I wasn’t thinking clearly at this time because I was so distraught,” she says. “I was going to work and crying every five minutes.”Shepherd’s mother, Joan Kiesow of upstate New York, referred a request for comment to Vesselin Mitev, her attorney with Miller Place-based John Ray & Associates, the firm that also represents the family of Shannan Gilbert, whose disappearance from Oak Beach in 2010 led to the discovery of 10 sets of human remains along Ocean Parkway—some of whom police believe to be victims of a serial killer.“The benefit of hindsight always means to put in sharp relief that which could’ve been done and wasn’t,” says Mitev. “I believe everybody in this case could have done more, from Stony Brook University [Hospital] on down to the chain of people who are responsible for finding those who go missing.”New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is defending the hospital since it is a state facility. “We cannot comment on pending litigation,” says Melissa Grace, a spokeswoman for the office.Deputy Chief Kevin Fallon, the chief Suffolk police spokesman, maintains that the department did all it could to find Shepherd—same as the rest of the nearly 2,000 missing persons cases they handled last year.“I understand that it’s a very difficult situation for a family or loved ones of someone who’s missing that they feel that there’s always more that the police department can be doing,” Fallon says. “Any missing case we take very seriously because we always realize that not only the person could injure themselves, but a person may in fact be a victim of some kind of crime and we always approach it that way.”DESTINATION UNKNOWNAs the manhunt for the Boston bombing suspects showed last month, if law enforcement focuses all of its resources on finding someone, it’s only a matter of time. Or, as in the case of Raymond Roth, who authorities searched for by land, sea and air after he was falsely reported drowned at Jones Beach last summer, sometimes the case is a hoax.Fugitives and faked-death plots aside, there are generally three types of missing persons: those with cognitive disorders, runaways and crime victims. Aside from adults and seniors with mental disabilities who walk—or in Shepherd’s case, run—off, police more often field reports of missing children, mostly runaways that don’t get much public attention. Amber Alerts—a nationwide program capable of blasting data on missing kids via email, text, TV, radio, highway signs and even Lottery terminals—are typically reserved for child abduction cases.In late 2011, New York State launched the Missing Vulnerable Adult (MVA) system with nearly identical capabilities, similar to others like it that have been rolled out in most states nationwide. It was touted at the time as the Golden Alert system, a version of Amber Alerts for grown-ups. The MVA system also covers elderly missing people, who had been covered by Silver Alerts.But, just like teens who runaway from home tend not to be good candidates for Amber Alerts, adults with a mental disability who go missing may wind up in fliers posted on the state’s Missing Persons Clearinghouse website while investigators opt for only alerting local police and hospitals, not using the all-out, statewide MVA alert.DCJS says there have been 33 MVA alerts statewide since it was enacted, four at the request of Suffolk police, none from Nassau. Det. Sgt. Mark Pulaski, who’s currently assigned Shepherd’s case, says Missing Persons investigators only submitted names to the system and didn’t request alerts. DCJS maintains it issued alerts at the department’s request for Volden Chung, 72, on March 9, 2012; Kurt Werner, 78, on Dec. 26, 2012; Marie Imbis [age unknown] on Jan. 10; and Fredrick Ellis, 90, on Feb. 28. All were found.“We did extensive searches there utilizing ourselves as well as other groups that had agreed to help, and to this date, obviously we haven’t found him,” Pulaski says, adding that the reason why no Golden Alert was sent out for Shepherd was because the case’s original investigators believed he was still in the area. “Some people are missing, some people are hiding from the police. Dennis Shepherd, by everybody’s account, was hiding from the police.”There hasn’t been any activity in Shepherd’s bank account since around the time he ran off, Pulaski adds. The family’s lawsuit suggests that he is presumed dead.“Adults, they’re just not taken as seriously,” says Todd Matthews, a system administrator for NaMus, short for the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, a national repository that includes records for thousands of missing persons and unidentified remains that is open to law enforcement agencies, medical examiners, coroners and the public.“When a child’s gone, you know something’s wrong,” he says. “And I think maybe there’s reasonable hesitation on law enforcement to start a manhunt for somebody that might just not be missing, not appreciate the search. You really have to give the local process time.”It’s not for lack of trying. Nassau and Suffolk counties in recent years have been taking preventative measures to mitigate cases of missing people who are mentally ill.Nassau has the REACH program—short for Return Every Adult and Child Home—in which the public pre-registers loved ones who suffer from a cognitive disorder such Alzheimer’s disease, Dementia or Autism. Should that person go missing, their information and photo can be shared with police and the media even faster, since it’s already on file. Suffolk does the same, minus the acronym.Nassau police have alerted the media to more than 130 missing people through REACH since January 2011, although the department lumps them in with Silver Alerts. That’s a misnomer since the missing sometimes include children as young as 14 and adults younger than 65—all of whom are described as having mental issues. More than three dozen of those appear to still be missing and about 10 have been reported missing more than once.For the same time period, Suffolk County police have alerted the media to 44 Silver Alerts while sticking strictly to missing persons who were of retirement age, a handful of whom are also still missing. Shepherd is the only missing person Suffolk police alerted the media to in recent memory who wasn’t over the age of 64.But outside the Suffolk police district on the East End, when 16-year-old Ashley Murray left a note threatening suicide before she left her Peconic home earlier this year, Southold Town Police publicized it immediately. The media spared no resources covering the case, reporting in excruciating detail her personal issues as friends harnessed the publicity to organize search parties.Twelve days later when she walked into a police station safe and sound, her story ended on a positive note. For others in her shoes, it doesn’t always wind up that way.THE WANTEDMIA: Dennis Shepherd at the U.S. Open Tennis Championships in Flushing before he went missing.Back at Pilgrim, life has moved on since Shepherd’s disappearance. The same could be said for the new approach to investigating missing persons cases in Suffolk.Deputy Chief Fallon, the Suffolk police spokesman, says the shift from a specialized unit based at headquarters in Yaphank to detectives working in the seven precincts alongside investigators handling general cases is similar to last year’s redeployment of the gang unit.“If you have somebody missing say from the First Precinct…it will be the detectives from the First Precinct who will be responsible for the case,” he says. “They know the locations, sometimes they’ll know the person involved, or they’ll know people in the neighborhood involved. And they’re in a much better position, generally speaking, to do that type of investigation than, say, calling up the headquarters where you can speak to specialized detectives out here who aren’t familiar with the players involved.”Nassau County First Deputy Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter says his department has shifted its approach too, but hasn’t gone as far as Suffolk.“We use a hybrid approach,” he says. “We have dedicated missing persons people that work out of a detective squad out of headquarters…then we have…our precinct detectives take some ownership and some involvement.“Do they get more return on their investment by putting those missing persons detectives in precinct squads where they’re decentralized?” he asked rhetorically. “We’ve found that we have a hybrid and that’s what works for Nassau County.”Mitev, the attorney for Shepherd’s mother, says the family’s anguish drags on, nevertheless.“With each passing day the possibility that he would return unharmed diminishes exponentially,” he says. “They lose hope every single day that they’ll get him back.”Those interested in registering a loved one to the REACH Program should call the NCPD’s Asset Forfeiture Unit at 516-573-5775, Monday through Friday 9 am.-4 p.m. to set up an appointment.To register with the Suffolk County police, contact the Community Outreach Bureau at 631-852-6983.For more information about the state Missing Persons Clearinghouse, visit www.criminaljustice.ny.gov/missinglast_img read more

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4 ways to deal with employees’ personal problems in the workplace

first_imgListenI’ve often talked about the importance of listening and communication and for good reason. If an employee is dealing with a personal problem, let them give you at least a brief synopsis of what’s going on. You don’t have to get every detail, but by being in the know, you can now assess the situation for yourself and figure out what the best course of action for that employee will be.Keep it professionalObviously, you want to be supportive when an employee is dealing with a tough personal issue. But, the last thing you want to do is be so supportive that it makes it difficult for you to be the boss. You have to draw a line in the sand for yourself and not become more of a friend than a manager.Let them deal with itIt’s always tough when your team is down an employee, but the sooner they handle the issue, the better. If they need a few days off to get things together, figure out how your team can cover for the employee, decide how many days off you can give the employee, and give them space until that day.See how they’re doingGive them the freedom to handle the issues, but also let them know you’re thinking about them. The employee will probably feel a little guilty for being gone during this time, but by checking on them, they’ll also feel supported which will let them worry less about work and allow them to focus on the issue at hand. A text or short email will go a long way. 40SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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