City complains of uncertainty

first_img Share City complains of uncertainty by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBemoneycougar.comThis Proves The Osmonds Weren’t So Innocentmoneycougar.comTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island FarmDefinitionDesi Arnaz Kept This Hidden Throughout The Filming of ‘I Love Lucy’Definitionthedelite.comNetflix Cancellations And Renewals: The Full List For 2021thedelite.com KCS-content whatsapp Show Comments ▼ THE City of London Corporation will criticise the government’s taxation of the City in a report published today saying the current tax regime is damaging to London’s competitiveness and that rival countries are introducing favourable tax measures to attract internationally mobile staff.The Corporation’s report says the huge number of recent changes to the tax system as well as those on the horizon, gives the appearance of a lack of fiscal and regulatory coordination.The last three years have seen the introduction of several unexpected “tax events” such as the bonus tax, the bank levy, the increase in the top rate of income tax to 50 per cent, and a variety of other changes increasing uncertainty, the report will say.In 2009 the City contributed £66bn in tax, it employed over 300,000 and accounted for 10 per cent of GDP. The Corporation calls for greater consultation with government over taxation, while also accusing HRMC tax teams of being “unnecessarily adversarial”.Stuart Fraser, policy chairman at the City of London Corporation said the lack of predictability in UK tax policy was “having a severe impact on perceptions of those who make the decisions on new investment in global financial services which remain critical for the success of the UK”.He said the deteriorating position on tax certainty was a key issue for potential City investors in deciding whether to do business in London.?Fraser added: “While the scale of overall tax burden is a key consideration, it is clear from this report that our top priority must be to restore the perception of predictability and certainty that has for so long underpinned the UK tax regime.” center_img Thursday 14 October 2010 9:39 pm Tags: NULL whatsapp More From Our Partners Russell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comlast_img read more

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Man Group sees bounce back in client assets

first_imgThursday 4 November 2010 3:40 am by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryMagellan TimesThis Is Why The Roy Rogers Museum Has Been Closed For GoodMagellan TimesElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldZen HeraldThe Truth About Why ’40s Actor John Wayne Didn’t Serve In WWII Has Come To LightZen Heraldmoneycougar.comThis Proves The Osmonds Weren’t So Innocentmoneycougar.comTaonga: The Island FarmThe Most Relaxing Farm Game of 2021. No InstallTaonga: The Island Farm Show Comments ▼ Man Group, the world’s largest listed hedge fund firm, said client assets rose to $40.5bn (£25.1bn) in the year until the end of September, helped by strong returns from its flagship AHL fund that raise hopes the group can win back investors.Man, which has bought smaller rival GLG with its $25 billion of assets to help diversify away from computer-driven funds, had estimated in September it was running $39.5bn.The firm, which has seen eight straight quarters of net outflows even while the wider industry has begun to win back clients after the credit crisis, also said pretax profit for the six months to September before adjusting items was $227m.This was above the $215m it forecast in September.Man was boosted by a recovery in flagship fund AHL, which has returned nine per cent from the start of the year to end-September, having fallen 16 per cent last year. This takes it to six per cent below its high-water mark, the level above which it can earn performance fees. whatsapp Sharecenter_img whatsapp Man Group sees bounce back in client assets More From Our Partners Police Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgPuffer fish snaps a selfie with lucky divernypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.com John Dunne Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) Q32020 Interim Report

first_imgCRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2020 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz)  2020 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileCRDB Bank Plc is a wholly-owned private commercial bank in Tanzania offering a comprehensive range of retail, commercial, corporate, treasury, premier and wholesale microfinance services. The company has an extensive infrastructure of branches, ATMs and deposit and mobile terminals and uses a vast network of Fahari Huduma agents which are microfinance agents. The retail division offers financial solutions which range from current and fixed deposit accounts to home purchase and construction loans, refinancing and cash back services. The corporate division provides financial service across the board; including documentary collection, letters of credit, guarantees, structured trade finance, treasury services and foreign exchange risk management. Established in 1996, CRDP Bank Plc has three subsidiary companies; CRB Bank Plc Burundi, CRDB Microfinance and CRDB Insurance Brokers.CRDB Bank Plc is listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Wales v South Africa: Five things we’ve learnt

first_img Bottle it up: The Wales player form a huddle after an excruciatingly late loss The best, worst, most pleasing, annoying defeatWales’ performance against the Springboks, in isolation, was impressive. But in the context of the first test, it was miraculous. The performance must surely rank as one of the greatest seven day turnarounds in Welsh rugby. The Welsh pack was ultra-competitive against arguably the best forward unit in the world. The backrow of Josh Turnbull, Toby Faletau, and Dan Lydiate were mightily effective. Between them they made 44 tackles – Faletau made 18 on his own. Whilst the entire pack’s efforts were laudable, Gethin Jenkins and Alun-Wyn Jones were a level above even that – both senior players put in career highlight performances. Wales claimed 58% of the possession and 53% of the territory. The scrum ran at 83% and the lineout was equally stable, winning 10/12.Wheels on fire: Alex Cuthbert was sensational in the first halfWith a solid platform and almost violent breakdown work, the Welsh backline flourished – Mike Phillips, Alex Cuthbert, Jamie Roberts and Jon Davies proved that they are more than capable of moving the ball into the wider channels. It was particularly refreshing to see Jamie Roberts being allowed to pass the ball to screened runners and decoys rather being used like cannon fodder. Of course despite being seconds away from becoming the first Welsh team ever to beat the Boks in South Africa, this display can’t be treated as a victory. There were some sizable negatives. Wales didn’t blow one sizable lead, but two – they worked hard to build separate 17 and 13 point advantages. The defensive decision making that led to Wales being reduced to 13 men was questionable – as too was Liam Williams‘ brave but naive tackle and the events that led to the first of the unsuccessful drop goals. However, all of the Welsh squad and the nation will be quietly pleased to have restored pride.Gethin Jenkins. Bravery personifiedRecently there have been calls for some senior players to make way for the next generation. However, Gethin Jenkins’s performance against the Springboks will have put some of those calls into perspective. He was simply heroic on Saturday. His scrummaging was solid and defence was immaculate – completing seven tackles and missing none. But it was his work at the breakdown, in the absence of Sam Warburton and Justin Tipuric, which was so impressive. His nickname is ‘Melon’; well maybe now it should be ‘Melon ball’, so compact was his body position in the jackal. The Springbok clearout had enormous problems removing him once he had locked over the ball. To have turned in a performance like that after 107 caps does him immense credit. Respect.Cannonball: A gutsy effort by Ken Owens put Wales 24-14 headWales flooded the contact areaThe Welsh’s pack’s key performance indicators were all good against the Springboks but it was their work at the breakdown that requires particular praise. There was a marked difference in the Second Test. Wales flooded the contact area with bodies. There were no one man clear-outs and a single guard. Every ruck, numbers allowing, had a minimum of a double clear-out and two guards – without fail. It was a clever and necessary tactic against the Springboks. Whilst the pack weights, between both teams, are largely similar, there is something different about the Bok forwards. They aren’t made like that in the gym – they’re made like that in the womb and consequently require some shifting. The Welsh set-up will be mightily impressed that their pack managed to dominate the Spingboks for large swathes of the game. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g71yBh4mVpQ On Saturday Wales lost to South Africa in the most galling of circumstances in a result that will doubtless take Warren Gatland’s men a while to recover from ‘Feel a tad sorry for Liam WilliamsLiam Williams’ shoulder charge in the dying minutes of the game led to a penalty try and a simple conversion that ultimately cost Wales the game. Warren Gatland has since said that Williams has apologised to the players and that he, Gatland, hopes the player will learn from that experience and hopefully doesn’t do it again. However, before everyone lambasts Liam Williams it is worth remembering Williams was doing everything in his power to win the game for Wales, not lose it. Arguably the decision to opt for a lengthy drop goal, when there was still time to build vital phases was equally as costly.Collision point: Liam Williams closes in on Cornal Hendricks giving away a penalty tryA new approach to defending 5m mauls.Elite margins require elite decision making and it may be time to reassess the way that rolling mauls are defended. Between the 29th and 32 minute Wales conceded two yellow cards and a penalty try whilst defending the Boks’ phenomenal rolling maul. However there may come a point in elite rugby where it is simply more efficient to concede the five points and leave a difficult conversion rather than risk a yellow card and a penalty try. As this test has proved a single yellow card often leads to the concession of more than 7 points – two yellow cards is suicide.  It may seem counter intuitive to willingly concede points, but with repeated warnings from the referee, it is surely the correct decision – rather than concede a penalty try and a yellow card. It’s comparable to cricket where the concession of a single run is deemed more beneficial simply to remove an effective batsman from the strike. Food for thought.last_img read more

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Where rugby defences and Dennis Rodman converge

first_imgInsights into the basketball star’s methods covered in Netflix’s The Last Dance generate some interesting views on micro-skills and analysis in rugby Asked about studying, Burger says he was not as good at individual analysis as many others, but that team analysts fed him invaluable snippets that informed his approach. As for scanning, Burger feels his ability to read unfolding play strengthened over time as he got more minutes against the best sides.Kicking ahead: Felix Jones at Springboks training (Getty Images)Jones tells of one-on-ones during his playing days with Munster under coach Rob Penney, who used to start showing a clip of a game, and as play unfurled he would pause the clip and ask: what happens in the next 20 seconds?The idea was to work on recognising patterns, reading the field, picking up on cues.You get a flash of Rodman in The Last Dance, sitting on a folding steel chair, eyes fixed on a tiny television, doing his own rudimentary analysis, Nineties style. Jones sees a correlation for full-backs searching for where to run next.“This will probably fit in nicely with your piece on Rodman,” Jones assures us. “The level of analysis in rugby in the last five to ten years has gone through the roof. So those guys are now looking for cues from opposition players.“Leigh Halfpenny could be looking at what exactly Johnny Sexton is doing you know, what are his tendencies in attack? Where are his eyes going? What’s his tendency after they get on the front foot? What’s his tendency after they lose momentum?“There are certain cues that some players give away, even unconsciously. Sometimes they know they’re giving it away, but they back their skills to beat you there, with speed or whatever.“So there’s definitely a huge amount of analysis and also in terms of opposition team’s trends. There’s also the coach’s philosophy that you could probably pick up – that they want to bang one up the middle and then move it straight to the edge or if they want to go from edge to edge. If you know that’s the philosophy of the team, it gives you a second or two. And for the guys at the elite level, two seconds… I mean Cheslin Kolbe, Halfpenny, or Anthony Watson or Jonny May, in two seconds they can cover nearly 30m.“So one second is massive, if you can give away a cue, or you can use your analysis, it’s a big, big advantage.”The very elite teams can have four angles of footage for their analysis, which helps with learning opposition cues. Of course then there is what Jones describes as a game of “bluffing” from attackers.He sees Finn Russell as the current world No 1 for bluffing in attack – selling one play with his eyes and then opting for another. “It’s almost a game within a game,” Jones adds, “and a lot of the best full-backs in the world will be watching the ten. And that’s why a lot of tens are good full-backs and vice versa.”Reading the play: Anthony Watson fields a kick (Getty Images)As with Rodman’s analysis and the full-back’s studying, young goalkeepers are also said to assess attacker’s cues. It pays to be able to read your enemies.Of course, it also helps to be in full control of your own physical faculties.Burger says that the difference between the good and great is the ability to make snap decisions; settle on a technique. In the closing stages of his career he felt he was opting to use his left shoulder more as injury trouble meant he struggled to hit or wrap with his right. But before then he had built up “muscle memory” from being in certain positions often enough. In Ulster, Grant appreciates that you cannot drill everything on the paddock, but you need to work and work – this is why at the best organisations, coaches work closely with the S&C, medical and support staff when approaching skill acquisition.Asked a few seasons back, while at Bristol, what his approach was to passing on breakdown expertise, Wallaby great George Smith said: “My theory is you need to know where the ball is, then your body will react to that. If the ball is on the left-hand side, your body will naturally flow to that area. Once you move to that area, it’s about getting your stability or your stance right.“So if you get your stance right before you know where the ball is, you’ve wasted time doing that. The focus is always the ball, if you’re in a breakdown situation, but once you know where the ball is you can get your footing and your stance right.“It is a process, but whenever I talk to players about the process, every player’s body make-up is different. I have short legs, long torso. I would have liked it the other way around! And I’m going to be a lot lower than taller guys just through body mechanics.”As a coach, Brown is not overly fussed about missed tackle statistics, as long as the team are holding shape, working hard and committing to making hits. And with the sledgehammer hitters who come in from a blind spot, they may miss but it could force the attack to play somewhere they had not planned to or, perhaps, they could even get in a ten’s head.Immediately after the 2014 demolition of Clermont, in which Burger ran riot, victorious fly-half Owen Farrell said: “I’m glad he’s not tackling me. I know if I was playing against him you’d be looking for where he is all the time. You wouldn’t want him hitting you from the blindside. You can tell people know he’s coming.”At the very elite end, can an ogreish defender spook a playmaker? Maybe no one would ever admit that, but certainly you need an awareness of any potential stick in the spokes.In heavy traffic: Matt Toomua for Australia (Getty Images)Looking at things from an attacking perspective, Wallabies fly-half Matt Toomua tells Rugby World: “For me the hardest defenders to beat do all their work before the collision.“Whether that be with line speed, tracking or predetermining the move. Those players are very hard to break down, even if they don’t make the ‘biggest’ hit.“Those highlight hits are definitely a combination of the above. A guy like Sam Underhill at the moment has amazing technique, is a good reader and has great intent. Plus, he is physically a great athlete, hence he does well! Trevor Leota or Jerry Collins had so much intent and could read where the collision was going to be, so would unload everything into that spot.“Then a Conrad Smith or Brian O’Driscoll read the play amazingly and had great technique, but the nature of the space out in that (wider) channel doesn’t encourage as many big collisions as with the tighter lads.“It’s never an exact science – sometimes it’s chance and other times it’s more.”It may not be a science but it can be an art. One-off blasts or steals can happen for any player, but the very best, who line them up again and again, put in an awful lot of effort to make that happen. So do their team-mates. And there needs to be a hunger.Back at the court, Phil Jackson summed up Dennis Rodman in his book by saying: “He was so uninhibited and joyful when he stepped on the floor, like a boy discovering how to fly.”And in the end, for anyone to be defensively great in any sport, they need to love what they do. All over them: Rodman and Jacques Burger defend (Getty Images) Where rugby defences and Dennis Rodman convergeIT CUTS so quick in the edit that it feels like Dennis Rodman is picking up pace as he describes his bewitching ability to collect rebounds on the basketball court.“I’d just sit there and react, react,” Rodman says in one episode of The Last Dance, a Netflix documentary series chronicling the exploits of the powerhouse Chicago Bulls side of the Nineties, a team led by the irrepressible Michael Jordan. In the latter stretch of the team’s run they had Rodman – a colourful character whose antics belied an athlete who made a science of reading the flight of the ball and traumatising attackers.Explaining how he honed his instincts, Rodman explains that he would get friends to throw ball after ball at the backboard, from different positions. He adds: “I just practised a lot about the angle of the ball and the trajectory of it. You got a Larry Bird, it’s gonna spin. You got a Magic (Johnson), it’ll maybe spin. When Michael (Jordan) shoot over here, I position myself right there.“Now it hit the rim, it’s boom. Click, go back this way” – as jerking hand movements come in – “Boom, here, here. Click, go that way. Boom, that way. Click here, this way. So basically I just start learning how to put myself in a position to get the ball.”There is an art to being in the right place at the right time. Do it in attack in any sport and you are painted the hero. But do so in defence – especially in rugby – and nuance can be lost; the artistry missed.See a walloping hit, a timely rip, a much-needed turnover and often we ignore the steps preceding the incident. Defence can be a savage dance, but we often only laud the last brutal movement.The coach: Chicago Bulls head coach Phil Jackson in 1995 (Getty Images)On the court, Bulls coach Phil Jackson found the maniac he could trust, writing of Rodman in his book Eleven Rings that: “Dennis played the game with such wild enthusiasm that he soon became a fan favourite. People loved to watch him hustle for loose balls and pull down rebounds to ignite fast breaks.”In rugby, there are plenty of untamed characters prowling along defensive lines.“Jacques Burger was obviously known for the big hits and the venom in his tackles,” ex-Scotland and Saracens flanker Kelly Brown says of his former team-mate. “And that was a big part of it because he was very aggressive in the contact. But a lot of it was down to his anticipation. He knew where to get to in the defensive line so it would give him a chance to make these hits.“His timing in the collision was very, very good. You get someone like Jonny Wilkinson, for example – he is not a big man, but he could smash people and a lot of it is down to timing.“The power in the collision comes from your feet, through your legs, up the body and that essentially explodes out of your shoulder. Now, to get as much force into a collision as possible, that’s all got to be synced up. That’s where Jacques was very good.“I guess it’s just practice.”Related: How Jacques Burger stopped ClermontThe Saracens academy coach mentions that Burger also rarely missed tackles, but according to the man himself, speaking from his farm in Windhoek, he missed plenty when he was working his way up the game.“I made a lot of mistakes defensively because I was a big man-watcher,” Burger explains. “I had my target fixed and so I made a lot of mistakes in the beginning. You make a lot of big hits too, but you make a lot of mistakes when you man-watch constantly.Diving: Rodman and Burger (Getty Images)“If you are man-watching and you see what’s in front of you and it’s that one guy who looks like he is going to get the ball and you decide ‘that’s the guy, I’m going to hit him,’ you get off the line. But when you see that ball goes behind him or the play doesn’t go as expected, you often find yourself in a bad position.“So when you go round the corner, scan, look up and see what’s in front of you. But look at the whole picture, you know. Look where the ball is, the spacing between the next guy and see how many attackers are in front of you, where the touchline is, if you should hold or press hard if you have numbers.“My blessing at Saracens though was that I had freedom. I knew that if I did make a mistake and I made it big, that was fine. Obviously I didn’t want to make a mistake but someone was always on the inside or outside, covering. The coaches gave me that freedom – I wasn’t s*** upon. Paul Gustard especially said, ‘Go out there and if you can make a big hit, great, that means a lot for us. Don’t sit in your box, don’t be tidy and try to stay within the system, go and try hit somebody.’”Burger remembers a time of feeling relatively small. So initially he began throwing himself in low, to chop – though interestingly, he says his generation were not taught well to hit legs, so there was a lot of figuring out the skills further down the line.He says he was also not confident in his younger years. As he got bigger and stronger, he backed himself more. He adds that timing is not something everyone has, it’s like a good punch, and his feel for it came from repetition and sometimes just simple, ever-so-slightly-slower one-on-one work with a team-mate in a tackle suit. It took reps.Over in Ulster, forwards coach Roddy Grant has devoured the Chicago Bulls documentaries. And as he considers the value of chopping your feet to get in the right place, both in the tackle and at the breakdown, he considers examples from other sports too.He explains: “I’m a firm believer that you’ve got to be able to move a certain way to do something technically well. So there’s a big emphasis on movement stuff and flexibility.“That obviously links in with S&C stuff, but as as an example, look at Conor McGregor. He’s believes in being able to move a certain way to throw certain kicks or punches. And there’s Vasyl Lomachenko in boxing. His footwork is incredible. Everyone says, ‘Yeah, he’s incredible, he cuts these angles and he’s the best pound-for-pound boxer.’ It’s because he’s able to do it with his footwork. So I think that’s an area that’s overlooked a lot.”But if we rewind to Burger’s point about one rogue force within a rigid structure, you can see why that can cause carnage. Oftentimes brilliant structure can create opportunities for anyone to make a devastating play.Closing down: Cheslin Kolbe hits England’s Elliot Daly (Getty Images)He does not delve into any of the Springboks tactics that saw South Africa defeat England in the 2019 Rugby World Cup final, but speaking in broader terms, Boks assistant coach Felix Jones highlights ways to give any side an edge in defence.“There’s a huge bit on awareness of spacing,” he tells Rugby World over a video call. “That’s a massive thing, or actually getting numbers on feet. So, somebody might applaud a big read Cheslin Kolbe makes on the outside or a Makazole Mapimpi or Lukhanyo Am, where they make this big read from 30 or 40m away – one of those ones where he’s got huge line speed and the pass is in the air and he takes the guy ball-and-all. Everyone goes ‘Ooh, massive hit!’“The thing is, nobody would have seen the effort, let’s say 20 to 30m away at the breakdown, where Pieter-Steph du Toit or Siya Kolisi or Francois Louw made the tackle, got themselves out of the tackle, recycled back into the defensive line and got two extra feet in their width. So if you think of a Steven Kitshoff or a Frans Malherbe, they’ll never be able to make that giant read on the outside because they don’t have that speed. They don’t have that agility. They don’t have that ability.“What they do have is the ability to win the collision previous. They have the ability to roll out of that, run back into the line and give themselves two feet. It might only be that much (holding his hands shoulder-width apart). But by them giving that much the next person could take that much the next person could take that much (hands grow wider and wider apart). And although they think they’ve only gone two feet, the knock on effect, the domino effect, is that Cheslin gets an extra 15m of width.“Now instead of pressure he can actually see everything because he has all the width.”As Jones explains, if anyone just lies there the line tightens up and the outside men no longer have full-field vision – and what’s worse, if they miss their tackle, they leave strides of space for a speedster to exploit.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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California Meadow House / Olson Kundig

first_imgArchDaily Houses Architects: Olson Kundig Area Area of this architecture project Civil Engineer: SurfaceDesign 2017 WSP Group PCS CopyHouses•Woodside, United States Year:  CopyAbout this officeOlson KundigOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesWoodsideOn FacebookUnited StatesPublished on February 05, 2021Cite: “California Meadow House / Olson Kundig” 05 Feb 2021. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodGRP Siding Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisMill Finished Copper: Nordic StandardMetallicsHAVER & BOECKERArchitectural Wire Mesh – MULTI-BARRETTE 8130Enclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsSealantsEffisusGutter Repair – TiteGutter3Aluminium CompositesSculptformAluminium Click-on BattensTiles / Mosaic / GresiteMargresPorcelain Tiles – Linea PrestigeMetallicsRHEINZINKZinc Roof Systems – Click Roll CapsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteTerrealTerracotta Cladding TileDoorsECLISSESliding Pocket Door – ECLISSE UnilateralWindowsJoskoWindows and Sliding Doors – ONE SeriesMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream United States California Meadow House / Olson KundigSave this projectSaveCalifornia Meadow House / Olson KundigSave this picture!© Matthew Millman+ 23Curated by Paula Pintos Share Projects Photographs Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Firestone Building Products, PentalQuartz, Richlite, Spearhead, Stone Source, Barnett Company, Berlin, Bill Brown Construction, Dover, Elliott Bay Hardwood Floors, Forbo, Goldbrecht, Handcrafted Metals, O.B. Williams, OB Williams with 12th Avenue Iron, Peter David Studio, Yellow Mountain Stoneworks ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/956153/california-meadow-house-olson-kundig Clipboardcenter_img Lighting Design: “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/956153/california-meadow-house-olson-kundig Clipboard Susanna Van Leuven Design Team:Jim OlsonDesign Principal:Olivier LandaProject Manager:Alivia OwensProject Architect:Blair Payson, Christine BurklandInterior Design:Angus MacGregor, Laura Bartunek, Daichi YamaguchiEngineering:MacLeod and AssociatesConsultants:BHLDCity:WoodsideCountry:United StatesMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Matthew MillmanRecommended ProductsMetallicsTECU®Copper Surface – Classic CoatedWindowsSky-FrameRetractable Insect Screen – Sky-Frame FlyDoorsSaliceSliding Door System – Slider S20WoodGustafsWood Veneered Wall & Ceiling PanelsText description provided by the architects. Envisioned as a singular continuous, flowing expression, this family estate links architecture, interior design, art and landscape into an integrated whole. Unified around the central “home base” living area, views radiate across several reflecting pools to gardens and the nearby Santa Cruz Mountains. The residence includes three auxiliary buildings and extensive outdoor living areas, but the subdued sophistication of the design helps dissolve the home into its verdant site.Save this picture!© Matthew MillmanSave this picture!Site planSave this picture!© Matthew MillmanSpaces between the home’s various structures engage the landscape, which is organized into two interconnected parts. The cultivated portion of the site, with vineyards and olive tree groves, contains the “public” areas of the house, including living, dining and entertainment areas.Save this picture!© Matthew MillmanThe other side of the site, delineated by an infinity pool and gentle slope, opens into uncultivated meadow space. An earthy exterior palette inspired by the California woodland setting continues inside the home, which features a collection of custom furniture and lighting designed by Jim Olson. The result is a home integrated with nature, not only philosophically and visually, but from a practical perspective as well.Save this picture!© Matthew Millman“I always think of houses as something that should last for 500 years. If they have a long life, and they’re flexible enough to be used in a variety of ways, then future generations can take advantage of them for whatever their needs are. At Meadow House, we’ve done something that doesn’t have to be torn down or replaced. It can keep serving people for many years to come.” –Jim Olson, FAIA, Design PrincipalSave this picture!© Matthew MillmanProject gallerySee allShow lessPortsea Beach House / Mitsuori ArchitectsSelected ProjectsHousing Av. Lincoln / bakroSelected Projects Share Barnett Company Photographs:  Matthew Millman Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Landscape: Area:  17000 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project Mechanical Engineer: Barker Company California Meadow House / Olson Kundig “COPY” Structural Engineer: General Contractor: last_img read more

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ICU nurse talks how COVID-19 has changed her life

first_imgLindsey Burrell(TORRANCE, Calif.) — Lindsey Burrell didn’t always want to be a nurse. That changed nine years ago when her neighbor was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer and put on hospice. Burrell, who had her heart set on being a lawyer, spent much of her time with her neighbor in her final weeks.Before she died, the neighbor told Burrell that being a nurse was her calling. She applied to nursing school a week later.Burrell is now a 38-year-old intensive care nurse at Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center in Torrance, California. She’s used to very busy days in the intensive care unit (ICU), but treating patients with the coronavirus, COVID-19, has presented unique challenges.“Suddenly our patients are isolated in a room by themselves with the door shut,” Burrell told ABC News. “The barrier of not being able to communicate like normal has really made it more difficult in a mental sense as well.”In audio diaries, Burrell talks about the physical and mental toll of responding to the coronavirus pandemic. Her personal story is featured in “The Essentials: Inside the Curve,” a special series of the ABC News podcast “Start Here,” which posts on Saturdays.Burrell says she has been tested for COVID-19 twice, but despite symptoms such as respiratory distress, cough and fever, both tests came back negative.“I realize that the mental anxiety that has been running through my veins for weeks on end since we’ve been talking about this is physically making me sick,” she said.Burrell made the decision to reach out to a psychiatrist for help. She acknowledged that medical professionals bear a heavy emotional burden in the current crisis.“You know, we literally feel like, as nurses and other health care providers, that we’re in like a battle zone and you just hope for the best,” she said. “You hope that you come out unscathed, but there’s no promise of that. We are seeing things and doing things that we never imagined.”Burrell reflected on a photo from the last moment of normalcy before her life and work were affected by the coronavirus. It’s a photo from March 15 of her kids, a 4-year-old and an 18-month-old, sitting on the beach, watching their dad surf. Burrell’s family lives about a mile away from the beach and, prior to the pandemic, would spend much of their time there. On that particular day, as Burrell sat on the beach watching her kids look out at the ocean, she realized that the world was about to change.“Slowly, people were starting to wear masks,” Burrell said. “There’s kind of this feeling walking on the strand of like don’t get too close to me, but, you know, people would still stop and talk. And then days later is when it all closed down.”Her family is adjusting to their new socially distant life. Burrell’s 4-year-old son is no longer able to attend preschool, so she has started homeschooling him. Now, after spending long days caring for patients in the ICU, she cherishes the moments when she gets to come home to her husband and two children.“When I go home to my kids, who I miss tremendously, I can’t wait to see them,” she said. “I know that they’re going to stand there and stare at me because they know that they can’t touch me until I am [sic] changed my clothes and showered. But I get to go home. My whole life, my kids and my husband. Makes everything worth it.”At work, Burrell is finding moments of optimism. On April 9, she watched as one of her patients who had been in the hospital for about a week-and-a-half recovered and was able to leave the hospital.“That is the sign of hope that we needed,” she said. “It’s exactly what we needed.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Police handcuffed lifeless Andre Hill instead of helping him, family’s lawyer says

first_imgWSYXBy BILL HUTCHINSON, ABC News(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — Police body camera footage released on Thursday shows Columbus, Ohio, officers handcuffing an apparently lifeless Black man after shooting him multiple times and then standing around for five minutes and 11 seconds without rendering first aid.Andre Hill, 47, had a cell phone in his left hand, but no weapons when he emerged from a friend’s garage Dec. 22 and was shot to death.Following the shooting, a woman came out of the house and told police, “He was bringing me Christmas money. He didn’t do anything,” according to the body camera video. Police ordered her to go back inside the residence without asking her any questions, the footage shows.Ben Crump, the lawyer for the Hill family, said a now-fired officer opened fire without first giving Hill any verbal commands to stop and put his hands up. Crump said Hill was shot four times.“It’s really hard to stand here and keep my composure, because I’m completely outraged in how they treated my brother,” Hill’s oldest sister, Shawna Barnett, said at a news conference following the release of the body camera videos. “It makes no sense. They showed no humanity towards him. How do you sleep at night knowing that you did this and left him there and had the nerve to turn him over and handcuff him but not offer any help. Nothing.”Hill’s family called on prosecutors to criminally charge former Columbus Officer Adam Coy in Hill’s death.Hill’s daughter, Karissa Hill, 27, who lived with her father along with her three young children, said in a trembling voice that she will have to remember for the rest of her life “how nobody helped him.”“How there’s 22 officers on the scene and with body camera footage and not one of them helped my dad. But instead, the first time they touch him is to put handcuffs on,” she said.Crump said police showed the video to family members along with him and other attorneys working on the case Thursday morning, and he said the footage confirmed the “unnecessary, unjustifiable and senseless shooting of Andre Hill.”“Where is the humanity for Andre Hill? Where is the humanity for this Columbus citizen who had committed no crime, had no weapon, was unarmed, only holding a cell phone? Where’s the humanity for this citizen, for this father, this grandfather, this brother?” Crump said. “It makes you wonder if they had been trying to save his life versus trying to put handcuffs on him, would Andre Hill be with us today?”Hill was fatally shot after Coy and another officer, Amy Detweiler, responded to a 311 non-emergency call for a noise complaint.The body camera video was released a day after police made public a “informational summary” of the interview investigators conducted with Detweiler. In the interview, Detweiler said she heard Coy scream that Hill had a gun in his hand. She couldn’t recall if Coy gave Hill an order to drop a weapon.Detweiler said she did not see a gun in Hill’s hand and that she didn’t observe any threats from Hill during the incident.Coy did not turn his body-camera on until after he fired shots at Hill. But the his camera automatically activated and recorded 60 seconds of the episode without sound.Crump said that after Coy shot Hill, he and Detweiler stood near him for five minutes and 11 seconds.“He’s on the ground struggling for breath, and none of the police officers rendered medical assistance to him,” Crump said.He said that despite Hill lying motionless on the ground, a police supervisor told officers to handcuff him. Crump said the officers then left Hill in handcuffs for 13 minutes without providing any first aid help.“You see on the video, they handcuff a dying man, who was unarmed, who they shot multiple times for a non-emergency 311 call,” Crump said. “What is his crime? Why are they handcuffing him?”Michelle Hariston, another of Hill’s sisters, added that after viewing the body camera videos, she was left with the impression that police officers treated her brother “like an animal.”“He was preyed upon, and he wasn’t given any kind of chances,” Hariston said. “We’re completely outraged at what happened.”Columbus Police Chief Thomas Quinlan released a video statement on Thursday saying his initial reaction to seeing the videos “was anger and deep disappointment.”“I know it is horrifying to everyone who looks at it,” Quinlan said. “One of the core values of the Columbus Division of Police is compassion. And the body-worn camera video released today shows little evidence of that. Let me repeat what I said last week: Andre Hill should be alive today. A Columbus police officer is responsible for his death. I cannot defend it. I cannot make it right.”Quinlan added that the violations of police policy and standards by Coy “were so clear-cut and so egregious, his termination could not wait.”He said Coy faces an independent criminal investigation by the state, and the U.S. Department of Justice.Columbus Mayor Andrew J. Ginther also issued a statement condemning what he saw in the body camera footage.“Like most who have watched the additional body-worn camera footage from the shooting of Andre Hill and the time following, I am horrified by the time that passed before any officer provided aid to Mr. Hill,” Ginther said. “Our officers are trained to provide potentially life-saving care, and at the very least, comfort in these situations. One of the Division of Police’s core values is compassion. None of this was evident in the video released today.”Ginther said he has directed Quinlan to investigate the incident “completely and thoroughly, and to hold all officers who failed to uphold Division standards accountable.”But Michael Wright, another attorney representing Hill’s family, alleged the police department had numerous chances to terminate Coy in the past, adding that an investigation done by his office reportedly found 90 complaints against Coy dating back to 2001. He said 16 of the complaints were substantiated.“That means there should have been some kind of action taken,” Wright said.The lawyer did not detail what the reported complaints concerning Coy stemmed from, and police have yet to comment on the former officer’s record.Wright showed reporters an enlarged copy of a report Quinlan wrote about Coy when he was his patrol lieutenant in 2008.“In a letter I wrote in 2008 while Officer Coy’s patrol lieutenant, I made the following observation about, if sustained improvements are not fully realized, a decision whether Officer Coy is salvageable must follow,” Quinlan wrote, according to the document Wright showed reporters. “Should the interventions described above do not produce the desired results, a shift toward termination would be warranted, as Officer Coy’s service to the Division of Police will have lost all future value.”“This didn’t have to occur,” Wright said. “If the Columbus Police ]Department would have done their job and terminated Adam Coy before this occurred then we wouldn’t be standing here today.”ABC News’ Andy Fies contributed to this report.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. 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Store wars

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article The retailing environment is getting tougher. Heather Falconer looks at how Virgin Megastores grooms its managersIt has been a challenging two years for Virgin Megastore managers. Ever since Richard Branson bought back the Virgin Our Price chain from WH Smith in July 1998, they have been under increasing pressure to improve profitability in an ever more competitive market.The most recent example of this has been a radical restructuring in stores, designed to get more people out of the back room and on to the shopfloor serving customers. It will have resulted in redundancies in the 94 Virgin Stores by the end of October.From the moment Virgin Group purchased the business WH Smith had put up for sale in a bid to halt sliding profits, it became clear there were problems, explains personnel manager Gill Horner.”We just didn’t have a pool of managers ready to step into the big jobs such as managing the largest £6m-plus stores. “The feedback from top management was, where are these guys? What had we done to get them ready?” says Horner.”The answer was we had given them all the financial training and general retail skills, but in terms of creating senior managers with the ability to inspire people to get great results, we hadn’t done a great deal.”Between 30 and 45 per cent of Virgin recruits leave within 12 months. Those who climbed the ladder tended to develop excellent product knowledge and retail acumen, but their interpersonal skills remained raw.”In terms of what the customer would see, it was probably fairly good, the stock would be in the right place at the right time. But in terms of creating and encouraging a team of people who could challenge, give ideas, constantly look at improving, those abilities were lacking.”Open, honest cultureIt was at this point that Horner called in Jane Molloy of APT, a contact from WH Smith days. The first step in implementing the programme, named Stop Making Sense after a Talking Heads album to appeal to the pop-literate audience, was a 360-degree appraisal.”The areas that consistently came out weakest were leadership and teamwork,” Horner says. “The results showed a strong drive to achieve highs standards, but not to instil this in others,” adds Molloy.The feedback not only gave individuals good and often shocking feedback, but also built up a clearer picture of the organisation as a whole.”The quality of the feedback was some of the best we have ever seen from a company where 360-degree appraisal was new,” Molloy says. “It reflected the relatively open, honest culture of the business – people were prepared to give low as well as high scores.”Armed with their personal development goals, the managers took part in a four-day series of business-related group exercises with each person concentrating on their own particular “issues”. On the third day they presented to a senior manager on how they intended to use the training in terms of improving the business. A follow-up day two to three months after the event allowed the group to reform and report on their successes. “We used that day to address another business challenge,” says Molloy. “I remember one where we asked managers what were going to be the major challenges in making Christmas work that year. I know from talking with facilitators that they had some really quite measurable and significant results from people applying the learning from that workshop.” Horner says, “What I cannot do is say this programme contributed ‘x’ per cent to the bottom line. The results are dependent on what a particular individual was working on. For example, one manager might work on eliciting information from their team, valuing ideas, ensuring the team works effectively. “Six months later he might come back and say, ‘The examples I can give you are that I now regularly hold weekly meetings with my people, another member of the management team chairs that meeting, and I contribute along with everybody else’.Business improvedSo, has the programme created a pool of talented managers ready for the Big Challenge? Horner hesitates. “Our expansion has slowed down considerably. But I can certainly think of one manager who was in one of our smaller stores and was deemed to be someone with lot of potential and has since been promoted to a larger store.”Sarah Jarman, then manager of the £5.5m Oxford store, was one of those chosen for the pilot programme back in 1998. “The 360-degree appraisal was a real eye-opener. I was only recently promoted so was still pretty close to my team, but some managers had become a bit distant from their people because of the size of the business. It took them most of the first day to come to terms with how they were perceived. “The feedback from my line manager was quite a surprise. He wanted me to be a lot more assertive and challenging. “A big store manager’s position is about influencing peers in the region, dealing with other senior managers and making your mark on the business. “Afterwards, I got lots of feedback from my peers at regional meetings about how assertive I was, whether I gave a consistent level of input and challenged things I did not agree with.”Whether it put more money in my till at the end of the day I couldn’t say, but I became a more confident manager. I got closer to other managers and that improved the exchange of ideas which definitely improved the business.”Organisational barriersNow on secondment to the HR department, Jarman has facilitated on subsequent courses. “It is great to see people doing a lot of soul-searching and then going back to their stores really believing in what they are doing.”There are other success stories, Horner says. “When we first started running the programme we took a group of 12 managers to pilot it. Probably six months later four or five of those had been promoted. That is unusual. I am certain those people would have been ready eventually, but we pushed the speed.”Normally an important final component of the APT programme is to repeat the 360-degree appraisal six to nine months after the first. Horner admits there are now organisational barriers to this.”To ask teams to feedback on managers when those managers are making decisions about redundancies is difficult.” Indeed, the upheaval means immediate training needs have now altered, Horner says. “We have to make sure after the restructure that we are supporting not just individual managers, but the whole team of survivors.” Store warsOn 1 Oct 2000 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Russian Naval Vessel Makes Courtesy Call to Cork

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Russian Naval Vessel Makes Courtesy Call to Cork Share this article View post tag: call View post tag: makes View post tag: Euroasia View post tag: Courtesy August 31, 2012 View post tag: News by topiccenter_img The Russian Naval Vessel “Vice-Admiral Kulakov” is paying a courtesy call to Cork and will be berthed at the Port of Cork Cruise Terminal in Cobh from Thursday, 30 August until 19:00hrs on Sunday, 2 September 2012.The vessel will be open to the public on Saturday, 1 September from 10:00 – 12:00hrs and from 15:00 – 17:00hrs. She will be open to the public again on Sunday, 2 September from 10:00 – 11:30hrs.[mappress]Press Release, August 31, 2012; Image: Mil View post tag: Cork View post tag: Naval View post tag: Russian View post tag: vessel Russian Naval Vessel Makes Courtesy Call to Corklast_img read more

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