Nova Scotia Officially Goes SmokeFree

first_imgNova Scotians will no longer have to breathe second-hand smoke in public places. As of today, Dec. 1, smoking is officially banned in all indoor public areas, workplaces, and outdoor eating and drinking establishments in Nova Scotia. “It’s been a long journey to this day but well worth every step. Government has done the right thing in the interests of the health of all Nova Scotians,” said Premier Rodney MacDonald. Barry Barnet, Minister of Health Promotion and Protection said today is a milestone to be celebrated. “Today is a major step forward in the protection of the health and safety of Nova Scotians,” said Mr. Barnet. “Smoking rates among our youth are at an all-time low of 13 per cent. Research shows us that removing smoking from public places discourages young people from starting. “This is a key part of our overall tobacco reduction strategy.” Smoking rates have been reduced to 21 per cent in 2005 from a national high of 30 per cent in 2001. “I would like to applaud Nova Scotia for its efforts in protecting Canadians from exposure to second-hand smoke,” said federal Health Minister Tony Clement. “The harmful health effects of second-hand smoke are well known and can no longer be ignored.” Maureen Summers, executive director for the Nova Scotia division of the Canadian Cancer Society, thanked the government for strengthening the legislation. “All Nova Scotians are now getting the protection they deserve,” Ms. Summers said. “This legislation will eliminate the toxic effects of second-hand smoke in public places.” The amendments to the Smoke-Free Places Act were made in response to the many Nova Scotians who asked for a complete smoking ban in public places and workplaces. “Nova Scotians have made it clear that they want the ability to go to work and go out with friends and family to public places without having to deal with the harmful effects of tobacco smoke,” said Mr. Barnet. “Today, Nova Scotia has the toughest anti-smoking legislation in the country, and we are one step closer in making Nova Scotia the healthiest province in the country.” For more information on the amendments to the Smoke-Free Places Act visit www.sickofsmoke.comlast_img read more

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Nonunion pay expected to increase 32 in 2013

TORONTO — Non-union workers across Canada can expect wage increases of 3.2% on average next year, according to an annual survey by Mercer.The global business consultancy said Monday that the projected wage increases would match actual increases in base pay reported for 2012. They would also be up slightly from the average of 3% in 2011 and 2.9% in 2010.Mercer’s 2012/2013 Canada Compensation Planning Survey, conducted annually for over 20 years, includes responses from more than 750 employers across Canada and reflects pay practices for approximately two million non-union workers.[np-related /] The results cover increases in five categories: executive, management and professional (sales and non-sales), as well as workers in the office, clerical and technician classification and those in the trades, production and service sector.Mercer said the results are indicative of a steadily increasing trend that will also see top-performing employees — some 6% of the workforce — enjoy even higher increases as companies strive to retain critical talent.“Differentiating salary increases based on performance is the norm and remains an effective way for employers to wisely spend their reward dollars on the most impactful employees,” said Iain Morris, leader of Mercer’s human capital consulting business for Canada.“Since many companies are still working with limited dollars, taking a holistic approach to total rewards using internal workforce analytics as well as external market data to set appropriate programs for each employee segment is the smart approach,” Morris said.Mercer’s survey shows that in 2012 highest-performing employees received average base pay increases of 4.9% compared with 2.9% for average performers, about 60% of the workforce.Regional and industry differences were also a factor, with Western Canada continuing to lead the way with higher increases than the rest of the country.For example, the Calgary and Alberta markets forecast an average increase of 3.3% for 2013 compared with 2.9% for Montreal and Quebec.Oil and gas companies lead the way with a forecasted increase of 4.2% for 2013 while high tech/telecommunications and public sector/not for profit forecast increases of 2.4% and 2.5% respectively when salary freezes are included, Mercer said.The Canadian Press read more

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