Starting College QB Has Suffered Season-Ending Injury

first_imgA closeup of a Utah Utes football helmet.SALT LAKE CITY, UT – NOVEMBER 11: General view of a Utah Utes football helmet during the Utes game at Rice-Eccles Stadium on November 11, 2017 in Salt Lake City, Utah. (Photo by Gene Sweeney Jr/Getty Images)For Utah, Saturday’s loss to Arizona State did more than put their PAC-12 title hopes in jeopardy. In losing the game, the Utes also lost starting QB Tyler Huntley to a season-ending injury.According to a report by ESPN, Huntley sustained a broken collarbone in the third quarter against Arizona State. The injury will effectively end his season. At the time, Huntley  had to be carted off the field.Huntley was replaced by QB Jason Shelley, but the team couldn’t muster much offense with him.Utah were held to just three points the rest of the game after Huntley went down. The Sun Devils, meanwhile, ran away with the game, scoring 17 points in the fourth quarter for a 38-20 win.Tyler Huntley carted off the field, looking very upset. Hate to see injuries in this rough game.— Jordan Simone (@JordanSimone38) November 3, 2018The loss sent the Utes to 6-3 on the season but 4-3 in conference games. They hold wins over USC and Arizona, the two closest teams in the PAC-12 South standings.Utah’s remaining games are against Oregon, Colorado, and BYU.If the Utes can win just two of those games, it might be enough to send them to the PAC-12 championship game.last_img read more

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BUSUs Food First program gets boost from Ancillary Services

Through a partnership with the Brock University Students’ Union (BUSU), Brock’s Ancillary Services has been hard at work helping to ensure no student on campus goes hungry.At the beginning of the academic year, Ancillary Services jumped at the opportunity to support the growing demand being seen through BUSU’s Food First program, which supplies students in need with food and hygiene products.The Ancillary Services team has since been able to provide more than $10,000 toward the food bank through proceeds from Brock Sports Meridian Series games (Steel Blade and Paint the Meridian Red) as well as Swipe it Forward events with Dining Services. Facilitated by Sodexo, Swipe it Forward took place over two days and encouraged the Brock community to donate $1 to $5 while purchasing a meal at any dining location across campus.Bryan Boles, Associate Vice-President of Ancillary Services, said the decision to support the worthy cause required no deliberation.“Food insecurity is a cause that I have always been passionate about,” he said, “and learning that our on-campus food bank needed support due to increased demand provided a great opportunity to partner with BUSU.”Malcolm Dales, Associate Director Operations, Ancillary Services, said there’s a need on campus for this type of support to continue.“Food insecurity is a real issue that faces many students at Brock and we were eager to find a way to contribute in a meaningful way,” he said.The partnership between Ancillary Services and BUSU has allowed BUSU to serve more students with food and health insecurity needs.“This year, BUSU’s Food First program provided more than 1,200 food packages to undergraduate and graduate students — the highest usage rates ever experienced in the history of the program,” said Heather McLean, BUSU’s Director of Business Operations.“Clearly students are increasingly experiencing food insecurity at alarming levels, and so on behalf of BUSU and the Food First program and staff, we wish to extend our sincere gratitude to Brock Ancillary Services for their partnership and support, which has allowed us to serve more students than ever before.”BUSU first began providing food bank services in 2011. The program has continued to evolve through the years before becoming Food First, as it is known today, in 2016.BUSU and Ancillary Services are both looking forward to reflecting on the past year and planning for future opportunities to grow this partnership.To access the program or find out more details, visit the Food First web page. read more

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