Sorry America, the Humvee is Back…But Only in China?

first_imgThe Hummer brand started with a bang, but ended with a whimper. When GM shut the doors on Hummer for good in 2010, fans of the rugged automaker were surely upset, but not because a good thing had come to an end. In reality, Hummer began its slide from grace after the the civilian-spec H1 stopped being sold in 2006. With only the H2 or dreadful H3 available, and with sky-high gas prices, Hummer had little hope for survival at the time.Despite its end-of-life mistakes, Americans still remember Hummer as the maker of the ultimate macho-mobile: the Humvee. It’s this passion for the original that inspired Humvee Exports, a five-man operation in Michigan, to source H1 parts and export pre-made units globally. AM General, the original H1 manufacturer, has been selling C-Series kits to Humvee Exports since 2013. The company then took each $60K and recreated the Humvee.Now that the Chinese market is interested, Humvee Exports has turned to their Detroit neighbors for help. According to Car and Driver, VLF Automotive, the company behind power-packed versions of the Karma, Mustang, and Viper, has teamed up with Humvee Exports to assemble C-Series models with GM engines and ship the products to China. VLF’s leadership team, which includes ex-GM executive Bob Lutz, automotive designer Henrik Fisker, and Boeing executive Gilbert Villarreal, has taken on some eye-opening projects in the past, but this may be their most lucrative yet.The C-Series kit, which was shown at this year’s Shanghai Auto Show, looks almost identical to the original H1 from 1990, but the front end is styled after the current military-grade version. VLF Auto will offer the Humvee in three trims — Bravo, Charlie, or Delta — with different luxury and convenience features. Engine options include a 6.5-liter diesel V8 engine in three stages of tune: 190 horsepower and 385 lb-ft of torque, 205hp and 440 lb-ft, or 250hp and 440 lb-ft. If you’d prefer a gas-powered motor, you can opt for an LS3 6.2-liter V8 with 430hp and 424 lb-ft of torque.This all sounds great, but there’s one bit of bad news: if you live in the U.S., Humvee Exports and VLF won’t sell you a Humvee. Due to the restrictions of the new Low Volume Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Act, the Humvee cannot be certified for sale in the U.S. This 1949 Barn Find Coupe Was Resurrected As a 638-Horsepower Hellraiser The Bulletproof, Million-Dollar Ramsmobile SUV Has an Optional Hookah A Breakdown of All the Major Types of Car Racing The New Land Rover Defender Is Just as Glorious as We Expected 6 Fastest Cars in the World Right Now Editors’ Recommendations last_img read more

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Province Issues New Drivers Handbook

first_img Nova Scotia has an enviable driver and vehicle safety record.While there were 10,000 more vehicles registered in the provincein December 2002 than in December 1998, reportable collisionswere reduced by eight per cent between 1999 and 2002. Fatalitiesdeclined by 16 per cent in the same four-year period. Earlierthis year, Nova Scotia received a national award for safetyimprovements in commercial trucking. Some of the updates to the handbook involve non-motorizedvehicles. A bicycle safety brochure published by Service NovaScotia and Municipal Relations earlier this year is now part ofthe handbook. “Including the brochure in the Driver’s Handbook will ensure thatmore people are aware of their rights and their responsibility toshare the road, hopefully making the roads safer for cyclists,”said the department’s director of driver and vehicle safety, PaulArsenault. A Driver’s Handbook costs $7.49, including taxes, and isavailable from: Access Nova Scotia Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) service counters www.servicens.ca/publications/ by calling the RMV Call Centre at 1-800-898-7668 by mail order at, Service Delivery and Operations Division, Registry of Motor Vehicles, PO Box 1652, Halifax, NS, B3J 2Z3. SERVICE N.S./MUNICIPAL RELATIONS–Province Issues New Driver’sHandbookcenter_img If you have a driver’s licence – or if you’re thinking ofapplying for one – take a quick quiz to see how well youunderstand the rules of the road. The test is online atwww.servicens.ca/rmv/quiz/ and is available at Access Nova Scotiaor Registry of Motor Vehicle counters. The quiz is part of the launch of an updated Driver’s Handbook,which was released recently by Service Nova Scotia and MunicipalRelations. “The Driver’s Handbook explains how someone gets a driver’slicence or registers a vehicle, and helps them to be a betterdriver,” said Andrew Goodwin, manager of operations support atService Nova Scotia and Municipal Relations. “The test isanonymous and we’re not tracking results. No one is going to losetheir licence if they fail the quiz. It’s just a fun way ofdrawing attention to the updated version.” The revised Driver’s Handbook reflects changes to the MotorVehicle Act and safety programs introduced since the book waslast revised in 2000. These changes, which came into effect between 2001 and 2003, arehelping to make Nova Scotia’s drivers and driving habits safer: graduated speeding fines, the more dangerous the driver is, the larger the fine; new penalties for passing a school bus when its red lights are flashing or for ignoring crossing guards, making it safer for children travelling to school; and tougher licence reinstatement rules for people who are convicted of drunk driving, helping to keep unsafe drivers from behind the wheel.last_img read more

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