Imagining Tomorrow’s Schools

first_imgAll around the world students at schools and universities are preparing for year-end exams and graduations, and this time every year makes me think back on my own student days. The choices of programmes were way fewer, and the types of jobs to prepare for much clearer. It was nothing like the future today’s students will have to face.Where my generation is still often astonished at the impact of new technology, the younger generations are hyper connected. They navigate naturally in a world with voice assistance, self-driving cars, and not least information available at the touch of a screen. They leverage technology in everything they do and will demand the same level of innovation and personalisation at school and in their future jobs that they experience in their personal lives today.Although today’s technology changes and innovations present today’s businesses with interesting challenges, it will be even more challenging for our education system to adapt to the reality of tomorrow. How can teachers, schools and universities prepare our children for jobs that do not even exist yet? How can they help future generations make the shift from learning and storing information to digesting knowledge? How can they apply new technologies in the classroom and include both soft and hard skills?In a recent study – Realize 2030 – commissioned by Dell Technologies, 3,800 CxO business leaders from around the world shared their views on how they prepare for the future by working together with intelligent machines and new technologies in a so-called human-machine relationship. More than 42 percent believe they will get more job satisfaction by giving the most boring tasks to intelligent machines. And an impressive 82 percent of leaders expect humans and machines to work as integrated teams in their organisation within five years.What is even more interesting is that almost 60 percent say that our education system will need to change to teach students how to learn and how to digest information on the fly, rather than to continue to teach them facts and memorise data. This will be critical if we want to help students prepare for jobs that don’t even exist yet – taking into account that an incredible 85 percent of jobs that are likely to exist in 2030 haven’t been invented yet.According to a recent article in Harvard Business Review, the next generation will need to work in teams even more than today and increasingly integrate solutions and components from other teams in their own work. To do so seamlessly, they will need a strong set of soft skills ranging from creativity and adaptability to interpersonal skills. An open, inclusive and culturally aware mindset will prove invaluable as boundaries between companies and nationalities blur and crowdsourcing play an ever-increasing role.Future new technologies will not only provide the next generation with some incredible opportunities, it will also push their ethical boundaries and present them with difficult choices of how far they can and should go. Hence, a strong ethical foundation bundled with increased technological understanding will be key. In order to offer students the right set of hard skills and stimulate them to feel comfortable in a technology-heavy world, schools need to immerse students in a broad range of computer science domains from an early age. It is critical to secure at least some basic technological understanding, but clearly even better to help students discover a higher level of passion for technology – ranging from robotics to computational mathematics such as statistics, probability and logic.From what I have seen when travelling around the region, the future of our next generation is bright. More and more educational institutions already make use of new technologies that are available, providing students with great insight into what the future holds. But we can do better – I still see an increased opportunity and an important role for Artificial Intelligence (AI), Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) at the schools of tomorrow.With mobile VR, students would have the world at their fingertips. A VR history class could transport students to anywhere in the world and offer them an immersive history lesson without leaving the classroom, thus democratising knowledge and allowing children from all social classes access to the same experiences. Medical students could use the technology and VR videos of real-life surgery to practice steps of surgery in detail, and it could give architect and design students an instant virtual view of their projects. With AR, static images in books can be brought to life and bring an extra dimension to the learning experience.If today’s educational sector continues to utilise the available technologies with a strong focus on teaching soft collaborative skills combined with the right set of hard digital skills, they can offer tomorrow’s data-driven workforce everything needed to start their professional life – in jobs that are yet to be created.As the exam season nears I wish all students the best of luck with their exams – and the rest of us congratulations on a much better educated and technology savvy workforce of tomorrow.last_img read more

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Tiger Woods wins Laureus World Comeback of the Year Award

first_imgThe American had to re-engineer his golf swing due to his previous injury problems, creating doubts over whether he could return to the top having previously dominated in the sport.His triumph at East Lake came after he flirted with victory at the PGA Championship, finishing second to Brooks Koepka. Woods now has 80 PGA Tour titles and two more wins would pull him even with Sam Snead at the top of the all-time list.It is the 43-year-old’s third Laureus award, having been named Sportsman of the Year in 2000 and 2001.”I just want to say thank you for this opportunity,” Woods said. “I had an amazing year last year and to be recognized … is something very special, because if you’d asked me a couple years ago would I ever be involved in the game like this I’d have given you a different answer, and here we are. Thank you, it’s such an honor.”Congratulations @TigerWoods!The #Laureus19 Comeback of the Year winner pic.twitter.com/vYQTn0LWuG— #Laureus19 (@LaureusSport) February 18, 2019 Related News Tiger Woods has received the Laureus World Comeback of the Year Award after he returned to winning ways on the PGA Tour in 2018.Following four operations on his back in the space of just over three years, the 14-time major champion claimed his first win in 1,876 days at the Tour Championship. Tiger Woods fades at Riviera: ‘I got tired’last_img read more

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iPhone to Android: A Confession of Infidelity

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Related Posts sarah perez Tags:#Apple#Google#mobile#Op-Ed#web What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img I’m approaching the 3-month mark with my first Android phone – Google’s flagship device, the Nexus S. I can fully confirm that it has taken at least this long for me to really begin thinking of this device as my phone, as my primary device and the one that I turn to the most when I’m using a mobile. My iPhone, as those of you who have been following this series know, is only semi-functional these days, after a long, 30-minute dip in my backyard’s pond. The fact it works at all is a testament to Apple’s craftsmanship, I’d argue.Still, even three months into the Android experience, I feel the need to confess: I’ve been cheating on my Nexus S. And I’ve been cheating with the iPhone. Why? Because it’s there? Or because the iPhone still has Android beat in several key areas?If you haven’t been following my transition from iPhone to the Nexus S, you can start here with my one-week review, then check in again here when I hit one month, here when I reached a month and a half and here at the 2-month point. This is an ongoing series.A Confession: I’ve Been Cheating Here’s my excuse: the Nexus S’s battery life is the pits – that is, in comparison with the iPhone. Oh sure, it’s better than many other Android phones out there, I’m told. But coming from the iPhone world, it’s still not what I’m used to. I struggled with this in the beginning of my transition, and I still struggle with this today, despite making some gains in the area of battery management through the use of applications, best practices and a lot of plugging in.My phone is almost always plugged in when not being used, and when it’s not, I know what to expect – a drained battery by afternoon or evening, depending on use. It’s a fact of life I’ve learned to live with, a trade-off for all the other goodness (and of that, there is much) that Android brings.But this issue has also served as an excuse to cheat. My iPhone is still functional, still activated and still very much a part of my day-to-day life. Now, like a corporate drone whose I.T. department rejects personal phones on the company network, I carry not one phone, but two.Still, using the battery drainage as an excuse to return to the iPhone feels like the cheap excuse that it is. I could just as easily purchase a battery booster pack or extra battery and give up the iPhone for good, right? I could just as easily pop my SIM card into another phone in my collection. But instead, I keep picking up the iPhone.Why?Am I really an iPhone girl at heart? Have I signed up for the wrong camp?Why Am I Cheating? And Why Won’t I Switch Back (Yet) After much consideration, I’ve decided the answer is “no.” I may cheat, but I still prefer Android. On the grand list of pros and cons, Android wins for three primary reasons: better notifications, customizable homescreens with widgets and a more open system for installing apps and making changes to the phone.iPhone’s user interface has been stale for years. It bores me. App folders, while functional, are ugly. They hide the pretty icons that made the iPhone’s screen after screen of apps at least somewhat attractive. But because of the ever-growing app catalog on iTunes, organizing apps into folders has become a necessarily evil for real app addicts.The iPhone notifications are frustrating too. Pop-ups that demand attention, each with equal importance, whether one is a simple re-tweet from Twitter or an urgent SMS message. Ignore them by hitting “close” when you’re in the middle of something, and soon, you’ll have completely forgotten what the messages had said. Worse, in an effort to compete for your attention, some apps overuse the notifications feature in an almost spam-like way. As much as I enjoy Hashable, for example, I don’t need to know the exact moment when a contact of mine begins using the service. Yes, of course this is configurable, but it requires an extra trip into Settings. And what if I do want to know who starting using Hashable, just not in real-time, via interrupting pop-ups? There just aren’t great solutions for this on Apple’s current platform. Meanwhile, the notifications on Android are more subtle. Maybe too subtle. There’s no pop-up demanding your attention, but sometimes, that means you miss messages that you should have seen immediately. But on the plus side, the drop-down window shade keeps the notifications nicely organized until you can attend to them.Still, it’s iPhone’s demanding nature that causes me to return. In moments of quiet, when my iPhone buzzes with a pop-up alert I want to respond to, I grab the phone, slide to unlock and I’m in the application. I’m tweeting back, texting or otherwise engaged before I’ve even noticed that I’ve cheated on my Android.Android Still Lacks “Polish”There are also those minor complaints, so specific to my personal routine that they are hardly worth mentioning. But I will.For example, when using Google Reader’s mobile site – my number two most-used application outside of Gmail, something strange happens on Android – the news items start to expand, stretching out across the screen so that the little action items like “Edit tags” and “email,” found at the bottom of each article in Reader end up off the side of the screen, forcing you to scroll over to the right to find them. I don’t know how to reproduce this problem, but it happens every day. You fix it by scrolling back up to the top of the screen, so that you can again see the address bar. Then everything automatically resizes itself to fit properly within the screen.Also, my preferred keyboard, SwiftKey, has issues with Google Reader. Although I like using it everywhere else on the phone, here it drives me nuts. When I try to select the tag that Reader suggests from its drop-down box, SwiftKey autocorrects it. Sometimes this gets so frustrating that I simply put the phone down and switch to iPhone. I realize, of course, I could simply swap out keyboards temporarily, but then there’s still the other issue with the screen resizing itself in Reader.Like I said, these are complaints that affect my own personal routine, and won’t likely impact many others, but they’re enough of a hassle to lead to my cheating on the Nexus S. At the end of the day, I’m in Reader a lot (and I prefer the mobile site to the native app) and the experience is sub-par on Android. When people talk about the “polish” of the iPhone’s user interface, it’s often a sum of minor details like this. Things you would never notice until they don’t work. That’s the problem on Android – despite its power and features, it lack the attention to detail found on iPhone.There’s no tapping at the top of the screen to automatically scroll up, the copy-and-paste feature is still cumbersome, positioning the cursor properly is hit-or-miss and finger taps on links close together are often misinterpreted due a seeming lack of precision with the touchscreen’s hardware itself.You Decide: Polish or Power?But I’m willing to sacrifice the polish for the power, I’ve decided. Widgets and notifications are not gee-whiz baubles with no real value – they’re improved ways to interact with a mobile phone and the massive amounts of data we now have to consume every day. Maybe Apple will introduce them in the iPhone 5. Maybe they will be even better when Apple does so. But even if so, they’re incredibly late. The iPhone is perfect in many ways, but stale. It’s outdated. Yes, it’s easy. It’s intuitive. But to me, it’s boring.All that being said, Apple gets a lot of things right, and for that reason, there’s no real winner in my own personal battle pitting the Android against the iPhone. I will do my best to let the iPhone go. To switch it off and leave it behind. But for now, the best I can do is promise this: the iPhone is no longer my *primary* device. That will be my Android.Or whatever phone I try next.In fact, I have an HD7 running Windows Phone 7 in my bag, nearly ready to go through the same process. Maybe it’s time for another experiment. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaceslast_img read more

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Cousins says he was ejected for using big-man fundamentals

first_imgNew Orleans Pelicans center DeMarcus Cousins (0) elbows Oklahoma City Thunder guard Russell Westbrook (0) in the head, drawing an ejection from the game, in the second half of an NBA basketball game in New Orleans, Monday, Nov. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Scott Threlkeld)METAIRIE, La. — New Orleans center DeMarcus Cousins says he was protecting a rebound the way all big men are taught when he was ejected for a flagrant foul during a game against Oklahoma City.Cousins was called for a flagrant-two foul when he raised his right elbow near Thunder guard Russell Westbrook’s head during the third quarter of the Pelicans’ 114-107 victory Monday night.ADVERTISEMENT Kris Aquino ‘pretty chill about becoming irrelevant’ Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Westbrook complained that when he was struck in the head during a game, he didn’t receive the same treatment Nurkic did. And Donovan sarcastically said at the time that he “probably didn’t ask Russell to stay down on the court long enough to get it reviewed.”Cousins, meanwhile, said he was aware of how his ejection following contact with Westbrook fit into the Thunder’s own recent history with disputed flagrant fouls.“It shows that Russ is coachable,” Cousins said. “He listens and they got what they’ve been working on.” Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Cousins, who did not speak about the play until after Tuesday’s practice, said Westbrook “did a good job of selling” the foul in the way he fell to the floor, holding his head.“It’s crazy. When you start playing the game of basketball as a big man, they tell you, ‘When you get a rebound, keep your elbows high and out,’ you know, to protect the ball from guards coming in stripping,” Cousins said. “All I did was use my fundamentals and I got punished for it.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutCousins, who has a history of on-court emotional outbursts that draw a relatively high number of technical fouls, said he knew officials would not give him the benefit of the doubt when they reviewed the play on a video monitor before ejecting him.“I’m DeMarcus. I expected the ejection. I knew,” said Cousins, who was assessed a league-high 18 technical fouls last season.Cousins added that he’s not sure what he can do differently going forward other than “send the refs a Christmas card — I don’t know — the league, too. Send Christmas cards, stuff like that.”The play occurred under the Pelicans’ basket in the third quarter after Cousins had secured a rebound. When Cousins raised his elbows near Westbrook’s face, the Thunder guard went down.It wasn’t clear from replays showed to the crowd whether Cousins caught Westbrook in the head or shoulder, or if the contact was significant. 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Tagalog NPA LATEST STORIES Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Read Next QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Gymnastics doctor facing at least 25 years in prison MOST READ Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. The league office reviews such plays before deciding on fines or additional punishment.Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry agreed with Cousins’ comment about rebounding fundamentals, saying that Pelicans coaches also tell their big men to use the positioning of their elbows to help secure rebounds.“I don’t think he had any intent on hurting anyone,” Gentry said. “I don’t think there’s anything that was done from a malicious or intentional standpoint.”Hard contact is not necessarily required for a flagrant-two foul. Only contact deemed “unnecessary and excessive,” according to the NBA rule book, which also employs the term “unsportsmanlike” in the section pertaining to flagrant fouls.In some ways, the play appeared to be an extension of recent Thunder protests about officiating that drew $15,000 fines.Westbrook, Paul George and coach Billy Donovan all were fined for comments about a flagrant foul called against Carmelo Anthony, whose elbow made contact with Jusuf Nurkic’s head while Anthony was shooting the ball. Nurkic fell demonstratively to the floor and Anthony was ejected.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

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