Geomagnetic perturbations on stratospheric circulation in late winter and spring

first_imgThis study investigates if the descent of odd nitrogen, generated in the thermosphere and the upper mesosphere by energetic particle precipitation (EPP-NOx), has a detectable impact on stratospheric wind and temperature in late winter and spring presumably through the loss of ozone and reduction of absorption of solar UV. In both hemispheres, similar downward propagating geomagnetic signals in the extratropical stratosphere are found in spring for those years when no stratospheric sudden warming occurred in mid-winter. Anomalous easterly winds and warmer polar regions are found when the 4-month averaged winter Ap index (Ap) is high, and the signals become clearer when solar F10.7 is low. In May, significant geomagnetic signals are obtained in the Northern Hemisphere when the data are grouped according to the phase of the stratospheric equatorial QBO. The magnitudes of changes in spring stratospheric wind and temperatures associated with Ap signals are in the range of 10–20 m s−1 and 5–10 K, which are comparable with those of the 11-yr SC signals typically found in late winter. The spring Ap signals show the opposite sign to that expected due to in situ cooling effects caused by catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone by descending EPP-NOx. Thus it is unlikely that the in situ chemical effect of descending EPP-NOx on stratospheric ozone would have a dominant influence on stratospheric circulation. Instead, we suggest that the detected Ap signals in the extratropical spring stratosphere may be an indirect consequence of geomagnetic and solar activity, dynamically induced by changes in wave ducting conditions.last_img read more

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Quail Sausage

first_imgSausage is traditionally made from pork, but a University of Georgia research team recently developed a breakfast link-style sausage made from lean quail meat.The new product was created in response to a need in the Georgia food industry. “About two years ago, we were approached by a quail meat processor for help in creating a product from quality quail breast meat trimmings,” said Anand Mohan, a food scientist in the Department of Food Science and Technology in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “A lot of (quail) breast meat trimmings go to waste, and they don’t know how to use it.”Mohan turned the request into a project for then-CAES undergraduate student Carla Reed, who was eager to accept the product development challenge. A graduate of Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Tucker, Georgia, Reed made the decision to return to college after working in the food industry for a few months.“I wanted to open my own restaurant, so I returned to school and UGA has the only food science program in Georgia,” she said. “I wanted to learn the science behind the food and I definitely got to do that through projects like this quail sausage.”In the past, meat processors attempted adding pork and beef fat to ground quail meat, but the resulting sausage “just didn’t taste good,” Mohan said. The UGA team’s challenge was to use quail meat trimmings, without adding another meat source, to create a product that tastes good and is accepted by consumers.After six months of trial and error and a number of different recipes, Reed created a maple-flavored quail link sausage developed specifically to appeal to children.“I had never even tried chicken sausage when we began working on the quail sausage project,” she said. “But I do remember loving maple-flavored pork sausage when I was a child.” Quail meat is naturally lean, so the UGA group fortified it with plant protein. The protein flour also increased the sausage’s fiber content. “We wanted to make the sausage more juicy and tasty, as well as packed with extra nutrition for children,” Mohan said. “It has almost 21 percent protein, 0.5 percent fiber, too, and it has a lot of minerals in it.”Most sausage products are high in fat, but quail meat does not contain lot of fat, he said. “You cannot develop a sausage without fat. However, we were able to develop a tasty product that does not have any added animal fat,” he said.With just 3 percent fat, the quail sausage is leaner than most sausages on the market, but Mohan says that the UGA-created quail sausage recipe still tastes amazingly like pork sausage. “I think it tastes more similar to pork. It doesn’t taste like chicken sausage at all,” he said.The quail sausage links created at UGA are recommended for children as well as adults in U.S. markets. The small size of the link and the maple flavoring led the team to make a connection to the children’s market. “In the end, we were able to produce a maple-flavored sausage that was rated as good as a standard sausage by the UGA students and workers we used as a taste panel,” Mohan said. “And we compared our quality sausage to one of the best chicken sausage products produced in the market.” The quail sausage links received high marks for “flavor, aroma and bite” by sensory panelists during taste tests at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Russell Research Center in Athens, Georgia, Mohan said.The second phase of the quail sausage study will determine if the product would be accepted in the marketplace.Reed, now a food technologist at Albertville Quality Foods in Albertville, Alabama, hopes the quail sausage product makes it into grocery stores and eventually lands on consumers’ tables, but she knows the odds are against it. “I’ve worked on several projects that have been approved and commercialized, but the fact is that less than half of new products launched are successful,” she said. “It’s a good product for parents who are health conscious. It is a lower-fat alternative to high-fat sausage patties and links, and it would be perfect for those who are allergic to soy protein.”last_img read more

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South Pacific Fishery Threatened

first_img The governments of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Chile decided at a November 2010 meeting in Quito to strengthen the PCSP. The plan called for the PCSP, which is based in Ecuador’s main port of Guayaquil, to develop a greater capacity to respond to over-fishing and climate change. The commission has developed new initiatives, Peruvian Hector Soldi, Secretary General of the PCSP, told Diálogo. One is a sustainable plan to reduce fishing pressure on the resources of the Pacific. The PCSP will work to curb fishing by industrial fishing fleets coming from as far away as Japan, Korea, China and Russia, he said. Large fishing vessels travel thousands of miles and make big catches near the exclusive economic zones of the four countries throughout the year, he said. Most affected are migratory fish species like tuna, shark and mackerel, which are vital to the economies of the region. Tuna is the third most important export product in Ecuador after oil and bananas. And tuna suffered the biggest decline of Ecuador’s exports last year. Large catches by foreign vessels deplete the resources that local fishermen can access, PCSP officials said. “Foreign fishing affects the local fishing industry. This is evident in Chile, which has diminished the amount of fishing within the exclusive economic zone. This demonstrates that there is tremendous pressure on the resources,” Soldi said. The PCSP plans to determine fishing quotas and how many foreign vessels can approach the territorial sea areas. The quotas will be based on the historical records of each country; they reveal the number of vessels that have operated in the region and their catch, according to the PCSP. The commission hopes that nations will sign agreements on sustainable fishing and agree to comply with its quotas, officials said. Major fishing powers like Japan and Norway would be subjected to closures and catch allowances, as would local fishermen. Officials will present the statement on foreign fishing, co-signed by the four South American nations, at the next meeting of the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organization. The United Nations created the SPRFMO to manage exclusive economic zones. The PCSP’s main function is to unify the policies and positions of the four countries, helping them to defend their interests internationally, Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs Sovereignty and Limits National Director Arturo Montoya said. Another function of the PCSP is to foster cooperation among its members, he said. The Marine Institute of Peru, for example, has much to contribute to neighboring countries in marine biological research, as do the research institutes in Colombia, Ecuador and Chile, Montoya said. Cooperation may be the best way to promote conservation. Caring for the marine environment poses more challenges than land conservation, said marine researcher Soledad Luna, who performs her research on the northern coast of Ecuador. “Nobody owns part of the sea, everything belongs to the state and no one overtakes the ocean to take care of it,” she said. Fishermen can be key allies for conservation, Luna said – if their economic situation is improved. “This will allow them to practice sustainable fishing and cooperate with the State in caring for the resources,” she said. Fishing is the main source of income for the inhabitants of small villages along the beaches of the Pacific in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Chile. Unsustainable fishing practices know no borders – and neither does climate change. The PCSP is responsible for coordinating the evaluation of the impacts of climate change in each country and coordinating measures when the impacts are regional, Montoya said. The General Secretariat of the PCSP has been tasked since January 2009 with improving the collection oceanographic and marine meteorological information in the South American Pacific. The climate phenomenon known as “La Nina” has caught the PCSP’s attention in recent months. The ocean current has caused severe flooding and landslides in Venezuela and Colombia, erratic behavior of the ocean and lower temperatures on the coast and in the Andes in Ecuador. “What we want is to have accurate data about what might happen. Each day we lose marine species, sea levels rise and the temperatures are unstable. We must be prepared,” Montoya said. By Dialogo February 09, 2011 Twenty years ago, fishermen on the northern coast of Ecuador harvested lobsters with their feet. All they had to do was step into the shallow, warm waters of the Galera-San Francisco Marine Reserve. They were met by huge populations of the prized crustaceans. Those days are over. Fishermen now must go offshore to harvest lobsters that are smaller and scarcer. The populations and sizes of the most coveted species throughout the South Pacific have decreased significantly. That has prompted the governments of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Chile to strengthen an old institution, the Permanent Commission of the South Pacific (PCSP). The PCSP was established 60 years ago to protect the marine resources of the region. Only 2% of lobsters caught in the equatorial Pacific are in compliance with the minimum size limit for fishing – 26 cm – according to the Nazca Studies Institute, a non-governmental organization (NGO) that conducts wildlife research. Those statistics worry regional governments. Large-scale industrial fishing and climate change are to blame for declining lobster and marine populations, said Pilar Solís, Deputy Director of the National Institute of Fisheries of Ecuador (Instituto National de Pesca de Ecuador). Changes in ocean temperatures have led to changes in the distribution and the reproduction of wildlife, she said. The figures for fish production in South American countries bordering the Pacific are startling. Chile’s production fell from 1.7 million tons to 1.5 million between 2006 and 2007. Peru’s catch totaled 9.6 million tons in 2004. That fell to 7.2 million tons in 2007, according to government figures. Fishery statistics are current only until 2007, but Solís said the situation is not improving. Local governments hope a strengthened PCSP will stop the decline. The PCSP has a long and distinguished history. It was the first international organization to advocate that each country should have sovereignty over the 200 miles of ocean closest to its coasts. The United Nations formalized that idea in 1982 when it adopted the Convention of the Law of the Sea. center_img Foreign fishing Climate change last_img read more

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“Mega” Sharks caught on camera!

first_imgCheck out this incredible video of a huge great white shark that shook a cage filled with divers.Diver Nancy Lasuzzo was off the coast of Guadalupe Island, Mexico on October 12 when she captured the video.last_img

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Central Florida Sheriff: Child Porn Sting Nabs 17 Suspects including Two Disney Employees

first_imgBartow, FL — Two Disney employees and a former assistant principal are among over a dozen people arrested in a child pornography sting in Central Florida.The Polk County Sheriff’s Office arrested 17 people during a month-long operation.The sheriff’s office says two of the men were using Facebook and Snapchat to try to get 13-year-old girls to send nude pictures. Brett Kinney worked as a guest experience manager at Walt Disney World and had been employed at the theme park for 15 years.He told detectives he had an addiction to child pornography and had been viewing it for 22 years, investigators said.Donald Durr, Jr. was also employed by Disney for over two decades on their maintenance staff. Judd said he told deputies, “I’m a pervert but I’m not a monster.” Those arrested range from a 19-years-old UCF student to a 77-year-old man. Over 600 charges have been filed against the group. CHILD PORN STING: The 31 men arrested include a 19-year-old UCF student and 2 Disney World employees.DETAILS: https://t.co/Vc4L0Ajcle— FOX 35 Orlando (@fox35orlando) November 8, 2019 A representative for Disney said Kinney no longer works for the company and that Durr is on unpaid leave.A former assistant principal of Seth McKeel Middle School was among those arrested. William Hage, 76, worked for 30 years in the Polk County School District before retiring 14 years ago. Investigators said he was charged with 252 counts of child porn possession, including images of children as young as eight to 12 months old.Another suspect, Edgar Villegas, had been released from prison back in March 2019 after serving six years in prison for child pornography. He was still on probation for those charges when he was arrested in this latest operation.Click here to read news release: Polk County Sheriff’s Office Computer Crimes Unit arrests 17 during Operation Guardians of Innocence IV: Fall Haul.last_img read more

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Rain and Sweater Weather Returning to South Florida

first_img“The coldest temperatures will be felt Sunday and Monday morning with lows in the low to mid 40s across the interior and low 50s along the east coast,” says the NWS.The cooler weather and dry conditions will stay with us into next week, with Monday’s high temperature forecast to be 72, and staying around that point through Wednesday. Graphic courtesy: WPTV/NewsChannel 5 Time to break out those sweaters and jackets!The wild weather pattern that we experienced during the holidays will be taking yet another turn this weekend.Saturday will bring with it rain and the beginning of cooler temperatures.Showers and thunderstorms are expected in the afternoon ahead of that cold front, says the National Weather Service.The overall rain chance is 40 percent, and the high will be about 86, with breezy winds coming from the south at 10 to 16 mph and gusts of up to 21 mph.By Sunday, we will wake up to temperatures in the upper 60s, with dry and sunny conditions, and winds from the north at 11 to 15 mph, gusting up to 20 mph.last_img read more

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Man dies after becoming trapped inside of a donation bin

first_imgOfficials in Tennessee are reporting that a man has died after he became trapped inside of a donation bin just outside of a Walmart.The incident was reported Sunday at the establishment in Clarksville.Authorities say they responded to the scene to find the lower half of an adult male protruding from the bin.Officials were able to extract the man from the bin, however, he was pronounced dead at the scene.It is unclear at this time how long the man may have been stuck in the bin or his exact cause of death. Authorities are continuing to investigate the incident, however, they did report that they do not suspect foul play.last_img

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Senate Acquits President Trump On Both Articles Of Impeachment

first_imgThe United States Senate voted not to impeach President Trump Wednesday on two articles of impeachment.  In Article 1 Abuse of Power 52 Not Guilty and 48 Guilty.  Mitt Romney was the only Republican to vote guilty.In Article 2 Obstruction of Congress.  53 Not Guilty and 47 Guilty.  We will have more reaction on this story throughout the evening and tomorrow morning with Jennifer Ross and Bill Adams.last_img

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Helping Abused Children Recover

first_imgBy Marion LynchThere are nearly three confirmed incidents of child sex abuse every day in New Jersey. These are not crimes committed by strangers, but by parents, guardians, family members or others who have custody or control of children.When a child is violated by a trusted friend or family member, there can be significant and long-lasting effects.But recent research has found that with the proper therapy and support, these young victims can become survivors, recovering from their trauma and living healthy and happy lives.The Monmouth Family Growth Program of Catholic Charities helps children who experience sexual abuse at their main office at 145 Maple Ave., Red Bank and in satellite offices in Keansburg, Neptune, and the Child Advocacy Center in Freehold.Program director Jane Meyer says the staff has training in evidence-based treatments for children who have experienced trauma or abuse.Most of their patients are referred by the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office or the New Jersey Department of Child Protection and Permanency (formerly DYFS)“It’s really critical that children receive help,” said Meyer, citing studies that link traumatic childhood experiences like sexual abuse with long-term health consequences. “Conditions such as diabetes, obesity and alcoholism are very closely linked to childhood trauma.”According to a report by Prevent Child Abuse New Jersey, researchers have found that children who experience sexual abuse suffer from sleep disorders, eating disorders, behavior problems, depression and difficulty in school.When they become adults, victims are more than twice as likely to commit suicide. They also face increased risks of alcohol and drug abuse, mental health issues and marital and family problems.The program employs Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). Trained therapists teach the children coping skills and give them an opportunity to tell the story of their abuse in a safe, child-friendly environment, Meyer says. They also work with parents or caregivers so they can learn how to care for their child as the go through the healing process.“A lot of times children will go to a general counselor or therapist and not get trauma treatment, “ says Meyer. “Because we use these evidence-based treatments we’re able to show the efficacy.”As a result of the effectiveness of the treatment, she says, “We know that children are going to be resilient and get through this and experience fewer effects later in life.”Therapy often begins with the young clients learning coping skills and relaxation techniques, Meyer says. Then the children are encouraged to tell their story in “whatever way they find comfortable.”“They may make a drawing or a collage, or they may dictate it while we type it,” Meyer says. “Some use an IPad and make a movie – whatever medium they want. We reach them wherever their interests are.”The importance of this process, Meyer says, is that the children get comfortable with telling their story. “They get comfortable with the words, and then they share it with their caregiver.”Many caregivers are hearing the details of the child’s experience for the first time, and therapists work with them so they can respond with support. “We make sure that they are going to be able to hear it so that they can respond in a way that’s comforting to the child.”The program employs five full-time therapists and a number of part-time counselors, treating approximately 400 clients a year. Their clients range from age 3 to young adulthood. They also work with adults who are survivors of childhood abuse.“It’s hard work, and we hear so many heartbreaking stories,” Meyers says.But the proven success of the program is encouraging to those who are working to help the children heal.“Even though we see a lot of sad things, we also see that kids get better.”“We see that they’re happy, that they’re doing well in school,” she says. “We see the change in them. It’s really rewarding work.”For more information about services offered at the Monmouth Family Growth Center, call 800-360-7711 or visit www.catholiccharitiestrenton.orglast_img read more

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Bruins preparing for hostile atmosphere

first_imgLogistically, getting to Washington State is easily the worst endeavor in the Pacific-10. On game day, rowdy fans, a loud stadium and a poor locker room situation make it difficult for visiting teams. UCLA talked all week about minimizing those the distractions. Today, the 12th-ranked Bruins will find out if it worked as they play their first true road game against the Cougars at cozy Martin Stadium. To cap it off, UCLA (5-0, 2-0 Pac- 10) hasn’t won at WSU (3-2, 0-2) since 1993, and lost the last four in the series. “It’s a rowdy crowd, a little town. Everything about it is college football,’ UCLA senior quarterback Drew Olson said. “It’s what it’s supposed to be like. It’s a good challenge. I love playing on the road. I love road trips. I love getting on a plane. I love flying to other places and playing, seeing other schools, and playing at other schools and seeing their fans. There’s a lot of motivation for us in this game.’ The airport in Pullman is too small to land charter flights teams use, so after a 2 1/2-hour flight from LAX to Spokane, Wash., a 2 1/2-hour bus ride south ensues. “(The drive) is going through nothing but hills,’ UCLA tailback Maurice Drew said. “It’s one of the worst drives I’ve been on, but when you don’t worry about that and just concentrate on what you have to do, you’ll be all right.’ Once there, the visitor’s are usually treated with hostility, as the current UCLA juniors and seniors learned in 2003. The locker rooms are few hundred yards away from the stadium, and taunts by WSU fans usually accompany the visitors along the path. Several UCLA players complained about fans throwing stuff at them on the last trip, and strong safety Jarrad Page said racial remarks were also made. Two years ago, a lapse in security allowed a fan to enter UCLA’s locker room after the 31-13 defeat. The fan taunted the Bruins before being ushered out. “Oh, yeah, they got in there,’ Drew said. “They’re lucky no one got a hold of them. A lot of people were upset, but you’ve got to understand when we go up there and you have a hostile environment like that, things are going to happen. You just gotta keep your calm and stay focused.’ Then, there were the on-field debacles during UCLA’s last visit. It featured 14 turnovers, and UCLA’s then-anemic offense gained possession inside WSU’s 25-yard line three times and didn’t score a touchdown. Later in the game quarterback Matt Moore (now at Oregon State) was pulled after an interception. Moore and receiver Ryan Smith then got into a heated exchange on the sideline and had to be pulled apart by teammates. It was the last pass Moore threw at UCLA. He was replaced by Drew Olson, who is making his 21st straight start. The night culminated with a UCLA player pulling a drinking fountain off the wall adjacent to the locker room. The school later paid for the damage. “When they play us, they don’t give our team any respect,’ Page said. “I mean, they come out and they feel like they’re going to win when they play us, no matter what type of season they’re having. They come out and play us tough, so we know what to expect. But we know also what we’ve done this year, and we know as long as we take care of our business, we’ll be all right.’ 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week UCLA hasn’t defeated the Cougars since 1998, and the current collection of seniors are 0-3. Furthermore, Olson said UCLA wants payback for WSU’s two-point upset win at the Rose Bowl last season. “Shoot, they beat the crap out of us last year, even though we only lost by two points,’ Olson said. “They beat us. They beat us up.’ It is UCLA’s first trip outside of Southern California, and early in the week UCLA coach Karl Dorrell talked about the difficulty in traveling here. But by week’s end, he downplayed the affect travel has on the game. “I don’t think this is any bigger trip than any other away game,’ Dorrell said. “I think sometimes we try to portray it as you’re going to the Sahara Desert to play 16,000 miles away, and how are you going to deal with the 130-degree heat? It’s just a football game. We know we have to go up there with an expectation to win the game, playing in typical on-the-road conditions.’ Still, players and coaches especially coaches are creatures of habit, and there is nothing normal about this trip. last_img read more

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