Police: College hoops coach threw punch killing NYC tourist

first_imgLights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displaced Head coach Danny Manning said at the time that Jones was a “well-respected bright mind” in the coaching world and brought “new blood” and “new perspectives” to Wake Forest.Szabo, also 35, was taken off life support on Tuesday. His family says he was in New York for a wedding. Jones, 35, of Kernerville, North Carolina, was arrested Thursday. He is awaiting arraignment on an assault charge.His lawyer couldn’t immediately be reached.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’In a statement, Wake Forest said it would comment further once it gathers more information.Jones joined the Demon Deacons staff in May 2017 after coaching stints at Central Florida, Virginia Commonwealth and Florida Gulf Coast. This photo from Nov. 28, 2017, shows Wake Forest assistant coach Jamill Jones, second from left, with the team and head coach Danny Manning, second from right, during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Winston-Salem, N.C. Police say Jones threw a punch that killed a New York City tourist who knocked on his car window thinking it was his Uber ride. He was arrested Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018, and charged with assault. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)NEW YORK — A college basketball coach threw a punch that killed a New York City tourist who mistook him for an Uber driver, police said Thursday.Wake Forest assistant coach Jamill Jones attacked Sandor Szabo around 1:15 a.m. Sunday in Queens, causing him to fall and hit his head on the sidewalk, police said.ADVERTISEMENT In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWs Gov’t in no rush to rescue animals in Taal Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins Peza offers relief to ecozone firms Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Arrival of Courtois ignites fight in Real Madrid goal MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

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Proof is in the Pale Hose

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “We wanted to prove we deserve to be here,” said right fielder Jermaine Dye, who drove in a run and scored Chicago’s final run of the series on this rainy Sunday at Angel Stadium. Proven. They had the time, the time of their life, in the visitors’ clubhouse. There was Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf, trying to stay out of the champagne spray and gushing about the chance to play for the World Series title. He said he’d trade his Chicago Bulls titles for one of these. “It’s been worth the wait,” Reinsdorf said. “We’re both (he and vice chairman Eddie Einhorn) going to be 70. I didn’t think we’d have to wait this long.” ANAHEIM – OK, you tell the Chicago White Sox that what happened here Sunday night was all about Angels slumps and harebrained umps. The way things were going in the White Sox’s champagne-drenched clubhouse, they should be ready to listen to such talk sometime today. The way things were going in the first-base stands where the White Sox’s fans were chanting “Four More Wins” an hour after the final out, they should be ready to listen to such sour grapes sometime next spring. The way things look if you gave the White Sox’s one-sided series victory a cold objective review, they should never have to listen to such foolishness at all. The White Sox beat the Angels 6-3 to complete a 4-games-to-1 rout in the American League Championship Series and move on to the South Side franchise’s first World Series in 46 years and a shot at its first title in 88 years. And they deserve every drop of the champagne they probably are licking off the clubhouse ceiling as this is written. center_img There was Sox general manager Ken Williams right before somebody popped a cork and stung his eyes, talking about building a winner in a town of baseball losers. His judgment was keener than most others’ on players such as A.J. Pierzynski, Carl Everett and Bobby Jenks, guys with baggage. “We were going to live and die with this group because we thought they had what it takes inside to weather the storm,” Williams said. “We made a conscious decision (last winter) to sacrifice a little in terms of talent to gain in the character department. It was a risky proposition, but I wanted to live and die with guys who I felt good about.” There was Sox manager Ozzie Guillen, safely in the interview room, talking about what the character created. He wasn’t about to tell his players to put a cork in it. “We took a lot of beatings this year during the year about my team, and we just kept playing,” said Guillen, whose Sox lost a big division lead and didn’t eliminate the Cleveland Indians until the final week. “We stick together, and I think they deserve it, they earned it. And that’s why I let them enjoy themselves.” The Sox got the breaks in this horribly umpired series, which featured a couple more whoppers Sunday. The Angels must always wonder how things might have been different if Game 2 plate umpire Doug Eddings had called Pierzynski out on strikes as he should have. But after a 4-games-to-1 rout, the Angels don’t have much of a case. They couldn’t bounce back from the call, from their wearing travel schedule from Sox pitching. The Sox threw four consecutive complete games, the first time anybody has done that in a postseason series since the New York Yankees against the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1956. Scott Podsednik was the leadoff hitter that Chone Figgins wasn’t. Paul Konerko was the clean-up man that Vladimir Guerrero wasn’t. Joe Crede had more hits with runners in scoring position (four) than all the Angels combined (three). And that White Sox pitching. The Sox never needed the bullpen. After their Game 1 win, the Angels managed three base hits in the seventh, eighth and ninth innings of Games 2-5. “We made pitches,” said Don Cooper, the pitching coach. “We probably caught them at a tough time, after all of their travel. But the guys that threw the ball deserve most of the credit.” The Angels must worry, after the first back-to-back playoff appearances in franchise history but also the first back-to-back playoff disappointments, that they’re wasting the combined talents of Guerrero (2004 AL Most Valuable Player) and Bartolo Colon (2005 AL Cy Young Award winner presumptive). Meanwhile, the White Sox are seizing a rare opportunity for the club whose World Series title drought is one year longer than the Boston Red Sox’s. “They feel great, and they should feel great,” Cooper said. “Anytime you reach a goal you set out for yourself, you should feel great. Now there’s a new goal.” You tell ’em they can’t do it. Kevin Modesti’s column appears in the Daily News three days a week. He can be reached at [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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