Indiana Crops Emerging Quickly

first_img Another mostly dry week allowed farmers to wrap up corn planting and make significant progress on soybean plantings, according to Greg Matli, Indiana State Statistician for the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Temperatures remained above average with spotty precipitation. Some farmers used irrigation systems to help with emergence and keep crops healthy. Much of the rain came over the weekend which brought some relief to dry areas, although more is needed. Statewide average temperature was 71.7 degrees, above normal by 4.5 degrees. Statewide precipitation was 1.00 inches, below normal by 0.06 inches. There were 5.3 days available for fieldwork for the week ending June 5, down 0.4 days from the previous week.Wheat mature was 1% in the North, 5% in Central, and 8% in the South. Wheat continues to progress far ahead of last year, and is beginning to dry down.Cutting and baling of alfalfa and other hay continued on strong this week given the mild weather conditions. Some pastures are beginning to brown and are in need of moisture. Livestock is in good condition with only minor stress reported. Strawberry harvest has begun. Other activities this week included applying fertilizer, spraying herbicide, running irrigation systems, hauling grain, certifying crops with FSA, and roadside mowing.Corn emerged was 88% in the North, 86% in Central, and 55% in the South. Corn planting and replanting are nearly complete. The corn crop is emerging rapidly and remains 72% in good to excellent condition. Some fields experienced stand reductions from slug and insect damage. Farmers continued side dressing and spraying herbicides.By region, soybeans planted was 92% complete in the North, 90% in Central, and 51% in the South. Soybeans emerged was 67% complete in the North, 66% in Central, and 21% in the South. Plantings have caught up with the five year average, and emergence is not far behind. Some are concerned that the drying soil will lead to reduced germination with the recently planted soybeans. The already emerged plants are 73% in good to excellent condition. SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Crops Emerging Quickly By Gary Truitt – Jun 6, 2016 Indiana Crops Emerging Quickly SHARE Previous articleMorning OutlookNext articleClosing Comments Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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High Court throws out case against TV channel NHK in protection of sources case

first_img Help by sharing this information March 24, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 High Court throws out case against TV channel NHK in protection of sources case JapanAsia – Pacific RSF urges recently appointed Japan Prime Minister to take a new turn towards press freedom News May 5, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Japan News Japanese reporter held in Myanmar is charged with “false information” On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia to go furthercenter_img November 19, 2020 Find out more Organisation RSF_en News Reporters Without Borders hailed the Tokyo High Court’s decision overturning the city federal court’s action against a journalist on national TV and radio NHK for refusing to reveal his sources.The high court ruling on 17 March 2006 was similar to one taken by the Niigata federal court last October, which upheld his right not to reveal the sources which allowed him to report on a case of tax fraud by an agro-food business.However Tokyo’s federal court is continuing its action against journalist on Yomiuri Shimbun for refusing to reveal sources in the same case.“The protection of one’s sources is the basis of investigative journalism,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We therefore welcome the high court’s decision to uphold this principle and thereby allow Japanese investigative journalism to continue. We strongly hope for the same outcome in the case of the Yomiuri Shimbun journalist”, said Reporters Without Borders.In October 1997, a journalist on NHK, as well as one on Yomiuri Shimbun, revealed that the Japanese branch of a US agro-food business had hidden income of 8 billion yen (nearly 55 million euros) from the tax authorities.On 14 mars 2006, Tokyo’s federal court ordered the Yomiuri Shimbun journalist to reveal his sources in the case. The federal court justified its order, which ran contrary to the law on protection of sources handed down by the Supreme Court in 1978, arguing that information could have come from an official who had violated professional confidentiality.In an article carried by the daily in October 1997, the journalist referred to a tax official without naming him.The federal court judge ruled: “Allowing a journalist to refuse to reveal his sources would be tantamount to being indirectly involved in protecting a criminal act. This is absolutely unacceptable (…) and does not deserve legal protection. Furthermore, journalists should not be able to protect the confidentiality of their sources when they implicate a public official.” Receive email alerts JapanAsia – Pacific News September 16, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Goddard College partners with Vermont Center For Integrative Herbalism

first_imgGoddard College,The Goddard College Health Arts and Sciences Program and the Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism (VCIH) are pleased to announce a new learning partnership. VCIH students can now apply their learning (and transfer credits at the undergraduate level) to their individualized program of study in Health Arts and Sciences. This is the only independent clinical herbalist training program in the country that can be applied towards completion of education at a regionally accredited institution.Health Arts and Sciences is a low residency BA and MA program. Students spend eight days each semester in residency at Goddard and otherwise study from home in partnership with their academic advisor. The Health Arts and Sciences vision, founded on the principle that personal and community health are two dimensions of the same whole, helps students develop their wisdom and skills to cultivate wellbeing within a matrix of social and ecological health.The Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, located in Montpelier, VT, brings clinical herbalism to community practice through the weaving of science, spirit and grassroots activism, providing one of the nation’s most extensive clinical training opportunities, grounded in deep connection with the plants and place.‘By drawing upon the practitioner training available from VCIH, in conjunction with the ongoing inquiry and broader scholarship facilitated in Health Arts & Sciences, students will become practitioner-scholars of Western herbal medicine and expand their focus beyond herbal medicine within the Health Arts and Sciences program,’ said Suzanne Richman, Program Director of the Health Arts and Sciences program.This collaboration offers students of both institutions new opportunities. VCIH students gain access to the rich, diverse learning community offered by Health Arts and Sciences, and they acquire a college degree, thereby expanding their scholarship and future career opportunities. Goddard students will also gain intensive technical training in Western clinical herbalism when they take part in the VCIH programs.To learn more about the Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, visit www.vtherbcenter.org(link is external).To learn more about the Health Arts and Sciences Program at Goddard College, visit www.goddard.edu(link is external).last_img read more

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