Ethanol Production Expected to Grow this Year

first_img New numbers show that, globally, ethanol production will be up just slightly this year. In the Global Renewable Fuels Alliance’s Global Annual Ethanol Production Forecast, the group that represents about two-thirds of the world’s ethanol production in 44 countries says production of the green fuel should hit 85.2 billion litres in 2012. This comes despite the worries about the world’s economy: “While the world’s financial health continues to preoccupy policy makers and governments, the global ethanol industry continues to be a bright spot in the world economy. It continues to grow, supporting nearly 1.4 million jobs and contributing $277.3 billion to the global economy in 2010,” said Global Renewable Fuels Alliance spokesperson, Bliss Baker. Ethanol Production Expected to Grow this Year By Gary Truitt – Jun 27, 2012 “The GRFA’s 2012 production forecast sees global ethanol production continuing to displace the need for hundreds of millions of barrels of imported crude oil, further reducing our crippling reliance on foreign oil,” said Baker. “Policy makers and governments must recognize the significant contribution biofuels are making to the global economy while reducing the world’s foreign oil consumption,” added Mr. Baker. Source: Domestic Fuel SHARE Facebook Twittercenter_img SHARE Home Energy Ethanol Production Expected to Grow this Year Facebook Twitter The United States and Brazil continue to be the largest producers of ethanol with production continuing at a steady pace in 2012.The report highlights that Africa will see a 36 percent increase in ethanol production, although the continent remains relatively low compared to the big producers of ethanol. Europe is expected to see an 11 percent increase in ethanol production. Previous articleHouse Committee to Finish Work on EPA/Interior Bill ThursdayNext articleNorthwest Indiana Corn And Soybeans Still Doing Okay Gary Truittlast_img read more

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Democratic governments urged to summon Eritrean ambassadors on anniversary of 18 September 2001 crackdown

first_img Follow the news on Eritrea September 17, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Democratic governments urged to summon Eritrean ambassadors on anniversary of 18 September 2001 crackdown Organisation Prisoner of Conscience Since 2001 – Why has Sweden not managed to bring Dawit Isaak home? RSF_en Reporters Without Borders calls on the foreign ministries of the leading democracies to mark tomorrow’s sixth anniversary of the start of a wave of arrests in Asmara by summoning Eritrea’s ambassadors to express disapproval for a crackdown that led to the suppression of all freedoms and the imprisonment of more than 10 journalists in unknown locations.Governments that believe in press freedom should make a formal protest about the complete secrecy surrounding Eritrea’s political prisoners and the threats and extortion to which the Eritrean diaspora and exiles and the families of political prisoners are subjected, the organisation said.“Eritreans need the support of the democracies in order to get President Issaias Afeworki’s regime to loosen its grip on them and their families,” Reporters Without Borders said. “This anniversary must be used to show that press freedom and human rights are not a luxury reserved for a few prosperous nations but a universal right.”The organisation added: “It would be inconceivable if this anniversary were to pass without any sign of solidarity with Eritrea’s detainees from governments that should make at least some, minimal demands on the countries that have embassies in their capitals.”On 18 September 2001, the Eritrean government suddenly ordered the closure of all the privately-owned media and began throwing their executives and editors one by one into prison. For several weeks, the political police waged a manhunt in the capital of Africa’s youngest country.Hundreds of government opponents have been held in unknown locations ever since then. They include at least 12 journalists – Dawit Isaac, Fessehaye “Joshua” Yohannes, Yusuf Mohamed Ali, Mattewos Habteab, Dawit Habtemichael, Medhanie Haile, Temesgen Gebreyesus, Emanuel Asrat, Said Abdulkader, Seyoum Tsehaye, Hamid Mohamed Said and Saleh Al Jezaeeri.According to the information available to Reporters Without Borders, four of these journalists have already died in the 314 prison centres scattered throughout the country. The few Eritreans who have managed to escape or have been released say conditions in the prisons are appalling.Those who have not been arrested or who have not managed to flee the country are forced to live under the yoke of an all-powerful government. After the defection of several leading state media journalists, the authorities began last November to arrest other journalists suspected of staying in contact with the fugitives or of planning to flee themselves.One of the suspect journalists arrested at the end of last year, Paulos Kidane of the Amharic-language service of state-owned Eri-TV and radio Dimtsi Hafash (Voice of the Broad Masses), told Reporters Without Borders after his release: “We were beaten and tortured in prison for refusing to give the passwords to our e-mail accounts. In the end we cracked because the pain was too much.” Kidane died a few months later, in June, while trying to flee on foot across the border into Sudan.Daniel Mussie of Radio Dimtsi Hafash’s Oromo-language service has not been released since last November’s crackdown. Eyob Kessete, a journalist with the Amharic-language service of Dimtsi Hafash, and Eri-TV editor Johnny Hisabu were arrested while trying to leave the country clandestinely across the border earlier this year and are still being held somewhere.Even those Eritreans who manage to get out of the country continue to have to submit to the government’s dictates. All members of the diaspora are obliged to keep paying 2 per cent of their income to the Eritrean embassy in the country where they reside. If they do not comply, they are banned from ever returning home, owning any property there or even sending packages back to Eritrea.The families of journalists and others who flee abroad are exposed to reprisals and there have been cases in which close relatives – brothers, sisters or parents – have been imprisoned indefinitely and denied contact with the outside world. News Swedish prosecutors again refuse to investigate Dawit Isaak case News Receive email alerts to go furthercenter_img Help by sharing this information EritreaAfrica News RSF urges Swedish judicial authorities to reverse Dawit Isaak decision January 13, 2021 Find out more EritreaAfrica April 14, 2021 Find out more Reports October 27, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Holy Cross reports four confirmed COVID-19 cases since reopening

first_imgThis report was updated Aug. 23 at 9:42 p.m.Two Holy Cross students have tested positive for COVID-19, College President Fr. David Tyson said in an email to the Holy Cross community Thursday.The students who tested positive have been placed in isolation, and individuals who were in close contact with the students are now in quarantine.“Team members will make daily calls with the students in isolation as well as those in quarantine, ensuring all needs are met such as meals and prescriptions,” Tyson said in the email.Tyson urged students to continue to abide by safety precautions.“We ask that you continue the daily health check, along with being mindful about physical distancing, wearing masks and practicing good hygiene to keep our campus healthy and safe,” Tyson said. “We will continue to use strict cleaning protocols to keep all areas of the campus sanitized.”Two additional Holy Cross College community members tested positive for COVID-19 College President Fr. David Tyson said in a Sunday email to the Holy Cross community, raising the total number of confirmed cases at Holy Cross since reopening to four.“They have been placed in supported isolation at this time, and their limited close contacts have been put in supported quarantine,” Tyson said.Tags: COVID-19, David Tyson, Holy Crosslast_img read more

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Purdue officials evict gun club from campus

first_imgPhoto: FacebookWest Lafayette, In. — A 120-year-old tradition at Purdue University has been abruptly closed by school officials. The Purdue Rifle and Pistol Club has been evicted from the campus armory following a claim of lead poisoning by administrators.On the group’s Facebook page the post was made:“While they claim it is about lead contamination, we have heard opposing stories from Purdue facilities, REM, and others that points to the Club and teams being an unproven symptom where our expulsion won’t fix the problem,” the post said. Group leaders have made a plea to university president Mitch Daniels that included a legacy of competition and success over more than a century. The letter also expressed concern over the removal of banners and signage around the facility.last_img read more

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Salute Rastafarian Daniel Heartman

first_imgCalm, non-violent RastafarianRas Daniel Heartman did not have a major role in The Harder They Come, but his calm demeanor displayed in the movie, went against the violent ‘Blackheart Man’ image many in Jamaica had of the Rastaman.It was the first time some persons outside of Jamaica saw what a Rastafarian looked like. Fans in North America, who saw the movie in small theaters, flocked to Jamaica to learn about the Rasta faith. Respected, intuitive artist.Born Lloyd George Roberts in Kingston, the Jamaica capital, Ras Daniel Heartman was not only a devout Rastafarian. He was a respected intuitive artist whose work made a mark on culturally-conscious youth in the 1970s.One of those youth was Maxine Stowe, who would become a leading music industry figure with Sony International, Island Records and VP Records.She remembers Heartman as “a very intense artist, very much a loner. It was all about his drawings, going out and selling his prints.”In 1998, Ras Daniel Heartman moved to Tanzania. He died there two years later at age 47. by Howard CampbellThis is the 45th year since the movie, The Harder They Come was released. The film was groundbreaking in many ways, most notably for helping introduce reggae and Jamaican culture to an international audience.Part of that culture was Rastafari in the form of Ras Daniel Heartman who played Pedro, best friend of the movie’s main character Ivan, played by the star and Jamaican singer, Jimmy Cliff.The Rastafarian in Jamaica was marginalized at the time. Many were jailed or had their locks cut by police for their religious beliefs which included that Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I is God.last_img read more

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