Russian Strategic Submarine Receives Light Damage

first_img View post tag: Naval Russian Strategic Submarine Receives Light Damage Industry news A Russian strategic submarine received light damage to its outer hull when a fishing vessel rammed into it early on Thursday, a Pacific… View post tag: News by topic (rian)[mappress]Source: rian, September 23, 2011 View post tag: Light September 23, 2011 Share this articlecenter_img Back to overview,Home naval-today Russian Strategic Submarine Receives Light Damage View post tag: submarine View post tag: Damage View post tag: Russian View post tag: STRATEGIC View post tag: Navy View post tag: receiveslast_img

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Pioneering a ‘staple’ approach for treating COVID-19

first_imgStrategies to bar the coronavirus (COVID-19) from entering cells — thereby preventing infection and averting transmission of the virus — are among the most promising treatment approaches to COVID-19. Everything from antibodies to specially made snippets of RNA are being mustered in the effort to develop a safe and effective coronavirus blocker.An approach notable for its ingenuity — and the fact that it has proven successful in other types of viruses — has been pioneered by Loren Walensky a pediatric oncologist and chemical biologist at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders, and his colleagues. Using what are known as stapled peptides, the approach seeks to jam the “landing gear” that the virus uses to fuse to the cells of the human respiratory system.The new virus consists of a short coil of RNA wrapped in a protein envelope that includes stalk-like projections resembling points on a crown. A key surface protein “contains a series of coiled sections known as alpha helices,” Walensky said. “The virus deploys three of these helices to overlap with three others to form a six-helix bundle that fuses with the human cell membrane, allowing the virus to penetrate and infect the cell.“Our approach is to make a ‘decoy’ helix that slips between the two groups of helices to prevent the bundle from assembling,” he said.The decoy consists of a stapled peptide. Peptides are short chains of amino acids — not long enough to be full-fledged proteins — but can interact with proteins to modulate a variety of cellular functions.“One advantage of using peptides is that they are nature’s solution to targeting proteins,” Walensky said.Early attempts to use natural peptides as therapies faced obstacles because the peptides can lose their shape and get degraded rapidly once injected into the body.A chemistry-based solution was to reinforce peptides with hydrocarbon “staples.” In 2010, Walensky and his associates showed that a stapled peptide could effectively target the fusion apparatus used by HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS.Because many other viral families — including those of the RSV, SARS, MERS, and Ebola viruses, as well as the novel coronavirus — use the same fusion mechanism, there are valid reasons for believing this approach will work against them as well.“As we previously demonstrated for the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), our newly designed stapled peptides targeting the novel coronavirus’ helical bundle may be effective both as a way to prevent infection as well as to block the spread of infection to the lungs in people with established infection,” Walensky said.Experiments are currently underway to test the Walensky lab’s peptides against the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.last_img read more

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Editorial: A Call to Invest in the Economic Transition of Coal-Mining Communities

first_imgEditorial: A Call to Invest in the Economic Transition of Coal-Mining Communities FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From the Los Angeles Times:Though transitioning away from fossil fuels is absolutely necessary, it’s also vitally important to recognize the human and economic cost that such a change entails. That includes a significant number of jobs lost in northern Appalachia, Indiana and Illinois, and Wyoming, where the vast majority of the nation’s existing coal mines are found. Closing coal mines means cutting good-paying jobs in places where replacement work for similar pay is hard to come by. Though that shouldn’t slow the move away from fossil fuel, our energy policies need to be mindful of the disparate effect on coal-dependent communities, many of which are in rural and economically weak areas of the country.A bill in Congress could mitigate some of that economic impact. The proposed RECLAIM (Revitalizing the Economy of Coal communities by Leveraging local Activities and Investing More) Act would tweak an existing program aimed at securing old abandoned mines — for the sake of public safety as well as environmental protection — to make $1 billion available over five years for economic development primarily in old coal mining areas of Appalachia. The measure, introduced by Rep. Hal Rogers (R-Ky.) and backed by a bipartisan group of Appalachian lawmakers as well as the Sierra Club, dovetails with the Obama administration’s Power-Plus program, a broader effort to encourage economic diversification, job creation and other support for communities now reliant on coal mines and coal-fired power plants, as well as carbon-capture and sequestration projects.The RECLAIM Act would take a portion of the money that now goes into the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund, which is dedicated to cleaning up mines closed before 1977, and redirect it to economic development projects in old coal communities suffering from their mines’ environmental effects and the decline in coal jobs. The Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund is financed through a fee on mined coal, which has raised $10.5 billion since 1977.Rogers’ bill would make available $200 million a year over five years for reclamation projects that dovetail with economic development proposals on or adjacent to the abandoned mine sites. In essence, the backers say, the RECLAIM Act would take fee revenue that the government already has in hand and make it available sooner than it otherwise would be.There’s a broader concern over whether the shrinking fees collected from coal will be enough to cover all the obligations the fund already has, including about $9 billion worth of “high priority” projects. But supporters say the RECLAIM Act wouldn’t affect that bottom line, since the money allocated under it would still go to reclamation projects.Notably, the reclamation fund isn’t responsible for the restoration work that will eventually be needed at currently operating mines. Those businesses are supposed to post bonds to ensure that the land will be reclaimed once the mining is finished, whether the coal firm survives or not. Several states have let companies off that hook, however, by allowing them to put up little more than a pledge that they’ll fund the work. As the industry collapses, that looms as a significant potential problem for environmental remediation.Still, it makes sense to twin economic development proposals with reclamation projects. Although Rogers’ proposal wouldn’t compensate for all the job losses already caused by the shrinking coal industry, it marks a positive step in both recognizing and addressing the economic fallout of leaving coal behind. Congress should pass this bill and the president should sign it. But the government should also ensure that the initial goal of the reclamation program — to mitigate dangerous abandoned coal mines — is fulfilled.Full editorial: How do we ditch dirty coal power without sending miners to the unemployment line?last_img read more

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Sex worker wins anti-discrimination case

first_imgCourier Mail (Aust) 7 Aug 2012A sex worker has won an anti-discrimination case against motel owners in a Queensland mining town who refused to rent her a room. The ruling could have wider implications in Queensland, where the mining boom is also fuelling a boom in the sex trade. The Queensland Civil and Administration Tribunal has ruled the owners of Moranbah’s Drovers Rest Motel, southwest of Mackay, contravened the Anti-Discrimination Act. The Gold Coast-based sex worker, who can only be identified as GK, had stayed at the motel 17 times in two years until owners Evan and Joan Hartley discovered in 2010 she was bringing clients to her room. They then banned her from staying at the motel. GK lost her anti-discrimination case last year but appealed last month.http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/national/mining-boom-sex-worker-wins-anti-discrimination-case/story-fndo20i0-1226444881828last_img read more

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Serie A meeting Italian government to discover fate of season

first_img Brescia are sitting last in the league, and have nothing to gain by concluding this nightmare season. Torino president Urbano Cairo, whose club are 15th, would also gladly abandon the season. “I bow to the majority choice,” said Cairo, voicing his concerns over “the short time between the end of this season and the start of the next one,” scheduled for September 1. AC Milan’s Swedish froward Zlatan Ibrahimovic, one of the big stars of the championship, has already suffered a calf injury in training, and could be out for a month. “I think it’s chaos,” said Italy coach Roberto Mancini. “If I were to speak only as a coach, I would prefer it to stop and start calmly next season. “There is going to be an endless series of matches and I don’t know what state the players will be in.” On Friday, the ‘Plan B’ will also be analysed at the Lega Serie A meeting, a format with short playoffs to determine the title, European places and relegation, if the season is again suspended, or all the matches not played. Another issue to be solved is that of players’ contracts and whether they can be extended to complete the season beyond its natural expiration. The issue of wage cuts also remains unresolved and liability in the event of illness remains complex. But one team who have been anxious to return to the pitch are Lazio. Loading… Read Also: Serie A: Brescia contemplate terminating Balotelli contract The Roman club were just one point behind leaders Juventus when the season was suspended, and within touching distance of the third Scudetto in the club’s 120-year history. “We miss football, I don’t speak only for myself or for our team. We hope that the right decision can be made soon to complete this championship,” said captain Senad Lulic. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Serie A’s hopes of following Germany and Spain back onto the pitch will be decided on Thursday in a meeting with the Italian government which will determine the fate of the season in Italy. Italian Football Federation (FIGC) president Gabriele Gravina hopes for a return to Serie A  Sports Minister Vincenzo Spadafora will tell representatives from the Italian football federation and Lega Serie A if the health conditions are right to return to action after nearly three months. The season has been on hold since March 9 when it was halted as coronavirus infections spread rapidly in Italy. The pandemic has killed almost 33,000 people in the country. Clubs returned to group training on May 19 but competitive action remains suspended until mid-June. The indications are that Spadafora and the government’s Scientific Technical Committee will agree to both implementing a health protocol and to resume the season. If there is a green light on Thursday, Lega Serie A will meet Friday to examine “the different calendar hypotheses” for the remaining Serie A and Italian Cup matches. The league wants competition to resume on the weekend of June 13-14, starting with four postponed fixtures – Atalanta-Sassuolo, Verona-Cagliari, Inter Milan-Sampdoria and Torino-Parma. They hope the season will resume fully on June 20, with the goal of awarding the league title, defining promotions and relegations, before playing Italian Cup semi-finals, with the final in early August. The closing stages of the European club competitions could also be played in August. Three Italian clubs are still in the Champions League and two in the Europa League. – ‘Risking safety’ – But not everyone agrees with a return to the pitch and the packed schedule required with teams needing to play three matches a week, in hot summer conditions. Brescia and Torino, situated in the northern regions of Lombardy and Piedmont respectively, which accounted for nearly 60 percent of Italy’s COVID19 deaths, have consistently opposed to a return. “To finish this championship is forcing it in my opinion,” Brescia captain Daniele Gastaldello said this week. “It’s risking the safety of the players.”last_img read more

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Serena v Sharapova to headline Day One at U.S. Open tennis

first_imgBy Frank PingueNEW YORK (Reuters) – There will be no shortage of big-name players in action when the U.S. Open tennis begins today but the talk around New York for days has centred around the marquee matchup between Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova.Williams and Sharapova – for years the two most recognisable names in women’s tennis – will open the evening session at Arthur Ashe Stadium with their first-ever New York meeting in a match that may just have the feel of a championship final.“Of course I’m going to watch it,” defending U.S. Open champion Naomi Osaka told reporters. “I know you all are going to watch it. I think everyone in New York is going to watch it.“At every Grand Slam there is always some sort of drama. You know what I mean? Like a first round. Like, Oh, my God. So this match just happens to be that for this tournament.”Eighth seed Williams, who is seeking a record-tying 24th career Grand Slam title, owns a commanding 19-2 career record against Sharapova, who last beat the American in 2004 and has fallen to 87th in the rankings amid an injury-hit 2019 season.“Definitely. That’s going to be a match to watch,” said Canadian teenager Bianca Andreescu, who is seeded 15th and plays her first match on Tuesday.Among the other top names in action on Day One of the year’s final Grand Slam are defending champion Novak Djokovic, five-times winner Roger Federer, Australian world number two Ash Barty and Venus Williams.While that talented group will surely draw plenty of attention, the anticipation for their respective matches will pale in comparison to the Williams-Sharapova matchup.Williams and Sharapova have not played each other since the 2016 Australian Open. They were set to meet last year at the French Open but Williams withdrew injured moments before their fourth-round match.While five-times Grand Slam champion Sharapova may be far from her top form, she could still present a challenge for Williams, who has not competed since retiring from the Toronto final against Andreescu with back spasms.And while their clash is highly anticipated, not everyone in the tennis world is planning their day around the match.“There are a lot of other quality first rounds. It’s not the only first round in the draw,” said French Open champion Barty, who kicks off the action at Arthur Ashe Stadium against Zarina Diyas of Kazakhstan.“I think more importantly I’m focused on my first round on Monday, and that’s all I’m worried about for the moment.”last_img read more

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