Lake Avenue Church: All-Church Prayer Gathering for National Day of Prayer -May 3

first_imgEVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Top of the News On sunday, the 3rd of May, 2012, Lake Avenue celebrates an All-Church Prayer Gathering for the National Day of Prayer. It will be an all-day event. At 12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m. Prayers will be held at the Family Life room 107 and another set of prayers from 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. This annual event at Lake Avenue Church is sponsored by the Prayer Ministries. Lake Avenue Church Pastors will facilitate.With all the challenges facing the country, both at home and abroad, it is crucial that all humble themselves before the Holy Lord and cry out to Him to bring answers to those things which are out of one’s control but not out of His. He reigns supreme over all things. Only as one come before God’s throne and ask for mercy and grace will they see …• Justice for all• Truthful government leaders and• Hope for families that are struggling.Come and pray with your brothers and sisters in Christ. Call on His name in unity. Join together in the name of Jesus. Please check the official National Day of Prayer page here.For more information contact Lois Kasten, Prayer Leadership Team Coordinator at [email protected] or call (626) 817-4554.Lake Avenue Church, 393 N. Lake Avenue, Pasadena, (626) 844-4700 or visit www.lakeave.org. Faith & Religion News Lake Avenue Church: All-Church Prayer Gathering for National Day of Prayer -May 3 Article and Photo courtesy of Lake Avenue Church Published on Thursday, April 12, 2012 | 7:47 pm HerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Vietnamese Stunners That Will Take Your Breath AwayHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Yoga Poses To Overcome Stress And AnxietyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeauty Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. First Heatwave Expected Next Week Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe 8 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it center_img Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News Make a comment Business News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community Newslast_img read more

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Number of confirmed Covid-19 cases at LUH drops to zero

first_img Previous articleChange to Rent Supplement access for domestic violence victimsNext articleUpgrade works to begin on Glenties housing estate News Highland Number of confirmed Covid-19 cases at LUH drops to zero Twitter Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme The number of confirmed Covid-19 cases at Letterkenny University Hospital has dropped to zero this weekend, while there are a number of suspected cases onsite.The number of confirmed cases in Donegal has risen by one to 470.Meanwhile, An infectious diseases expert says the health system’s extra Covid-19 testing capacity should be used to screen people arriving from overseas.The HSE’s currently testing around 5,000 swabs a day, but says it has the capacity to do 15,000.Professor Sam McConkey from the Royal College of Surgeons says testing on arrival could mean less time spent in self-isolation:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Virus-McConkey1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. AudioHomepage BannerNews DL Debate – 24/05/21 WhatsApp Facebook By News Highland – June 14, 2020 Pinterestcenter_img Google+ Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter WhatsApp Google+ Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest Facebooklast_img read more

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The Bakery Project Part 5: Selecting A Product Range

first_imgIn part five of the Bakery Project, we explore how to develop and adapt ranges to maximise salesThe shining stars of any bakery are its products. Customers live for the sight – and smell – of rows of freshly-baked loaves, cakes and buns, so ensuring you stock a good range of products is vital.This, inevitably, varies from bakery to bakery and even locations within the same company. So how do you decide on the bread and butter of your business? Should loaves take centre stage, or is the spotlight reserved for something sweeter? And, with what’s in fashion forever changing, how do you stay relevant?A selection of breads, traditional cakes and treats such as brownies are likely to make an appearance in most portfolios, but think carefully about the occasions for which customers will visit the bakery.“There are a few items that are automatic, especially if they are trying to attract breakfast customers,” believes Terry Morgan, director at London’s Debaere, which provides pastries and desserts to coffee shops, retailers and bakeries.“Croissants and Danish pastries are always a good start in this instance, then we try to look at creating a good mix of products for them to draw from so they can always have a staple, such as Victoria sponge, and then have specials from time to time.”Bristol-based Pinkmans needed a menu that could work for breakfast, lunch, afternoon and through to the evening.“The concept was an all-day menu based around bread-making and baking and the oven,” says Steven Whibley, co-founder of the bakery. “This gave us a good range, but also kept a purity to the menu. The challenge was to combine three kitchen sections – bread, patisserie and savoury – so they complemented each other.”Items on Pinkmans’ menu include slow-fermentation sourdoughs – white, country cob, seeded sour and baguettes – with a heavy focus on toast and bacon sandwiches at breakfast alongside sweeter items such as brioches. Filled focaccia and ciabatta complement soups and stews at lunch, with traditional afternoon tea fare served later.“We felt the evenings needed a simple idea to work – ‘it’s pizza!’. With ovens and dough-making being central and most of the ingredients already in the menu, it was not a big stretch,” he adds.Just because something doesn’t fit into the workflow of your kitchen, doesn’t mean you can’t sell it. Many bakers opt to buy in lines from specialists rather than shell out on new equipment or dedicate the time to producing certain items. This is also a good option for those catering to specialist diets, such as gluten free, which is regulated strictly (see box out p26).%%Quote_32%%“Croissants and Danish pastries are much easier to source as they take a long time to make,” adds Morgan. “Typically –with mixing, shaping, proving, baking and cooling – they can take up to 12 hours. Also, a lot of cafés have limited kitchen space, so buying in complete products makes sense.”Reading-based Warings Bakery, which was established in 1932, buys in hot savoury pies and sausage rolls.“This is purely due to production restraints as we neither have the facilities nor equipment to produce in accordance with the law,” explains Daniel Carr, PR manager at Warings.For Joe’s Bakery in Bristol, meat savoury pastries are by far the largest group of bought-in products. They come from a variety of suppliers, offering consumers different price points, and most are bought frozen raw, then baked-off in the shop.“We use Warrens for our Cornish pasties and Penny Lane Foods for sausage rolls and savoury slices. Premium pies and sausage rolls are purchased from a local butcher who has recently established a pie and sausage roll facility. These are starting to sell very well, even though they are sold at premium prices,” explains Martin Hunt of Joe’s Bakery.Products from Clark’s Pies, a long-established Bristol pie bakery, are also stocked, alongside bhajis and samosas purchased fresh from a local supplier, which Hunt believes differentiates it from the supermarkets.“Our shop is situated in an area with a wide-ranging customer base and our bought-in product range reflects that mix,” he says. “Most of the savouries are eaten out of home and we have a large number of customers who buy daily or very frequently. In order to help prevent menu boredom, we offer a wide range of products and price marks, including a very competitive meal deal.”Another way to prevent menu boredom is to innovate. But knowing which trends to tap can be tricky as there’s a careful balance to be struck between weird and wonderful and just plain weird.“Innovation needs to be built into the structure of the business for it to work,” explains Whibley. Because of this, Pinkmans has many seasonal and monthly variations of basic items, such as doughnuts, sweet tarts and special breads. “We thinks it’s important to give the customer a mix of changing items and steadfast classics,” Whibley adds.Warings, meanwhile, considers all of its NPD to be a temporary addition to the range unless the sales convince otherwise. “We never consider a new product to be a permanent line,” says Carr. “Instead it’s used to enhance the range, add interest, offer an alternative, reflect the seasons and, hopefully, encourage additional impulse sales. If a product proves very popular, then we may decide to add it permanently, for example our Mars Bar slice which is now one of our best-sellers.”This method also has other benefits, notes Hunt from Joe’s Bakery. “Suitable products are put on sale as a ‘special’ or ‘seasonal’, or sometimes included in one of our national or British regional months. This gives us the opportunity to withdraw the line if it is not too successful without it looking like a failure,” he says. “A decision is then made on whether to carry on producing the line and whether it should be a daily, two/three-times a week or as a weekend special.”Hunt suggests monitoring trends across a variety of mediums, whether TV shows, newspaper supplements, social media or by getting out and about. The street food scene, in particular, is lucrative when it comes to recipe inspiration.Maximising information from food ingredients manufacturers and suppliers, he adds, is also valuable as they can provide a wider view of the market and trends within it and help deliver products in keeping with them. He advises bakers to also look at the trends impacting the wider food and drink market, particularly health-based ones, as, in many cases, it’s only a matter of time before it influences the bakery market.%%Quote_33%%It’s not always a case of looking for the next new thing, either. “Quite a lot of the time we find that it’s old favourites making a comeback, a forgotten star of the past or for nostalgia,” says Warings’ Carr. “Of course, for us that’s great, we can just dust off one of our tried-and-tested recipes and hit the ground running.”Not all trends are equal and some won’t have the longevity that has been seen with cupcakes, premium doughnuts and even unicorns. Monitor your sales, advises Whibley, adding that any products selling under 10 a day would be under scrutiny.“Normally, we monitor the sales of products that are in decline and either try to revitalise sales by making improvements, or we may put it on sale just two or three times a week,” says Hunt, noting it comes down to old-fashioned judgement.While profitability is crucial, not all lines have to sell like hot cakes.“We will sometimes continue to produce a slow-selling line if it provides benefits other than simply profit. Such benefits may be breads that have a ‘wow’ factor when on display, or breads that appeal to members of particular nationalities who come in for their own ‘national’ bread, but spend good money on other products as well,” says Hunt.Speak to your customers, find out what they want, adapt and deliver. Bean counting: the value of a good coffee offerBrits down 95 million cups of coffee daily in the UK, according to the British Coffee Association, so little wonder hot beverages are an important  part of most bakery retailers’ offer.“Consumers want the convenience of a one-stop shop to be able to get their food and drink at the same time,” says Daniel Carr, PR manager at Warings Bakery, Reading.Coffee and tea are an essential part of any eat-in offer, believes Steven Whibley, founder of  Bristol’s PInkmans Bakery. “Having a beverage offer to match the quality of the food menu was always a key part of our concept,” he says, adding that his business is also seeing strong growth in sales of fruit and veg juices produced on-site.Hot beverages can boost local sourcing credentials, with Sussex bakery business Foodhaven buying from a local roastery. Bristol-based Joe’s Bakery uses a well-established local coffee roaster, Brian Wogan, to match the quality of the large number of nearby coffee shops.“Until last year we used a different supplier and a beans-to-cup machine, but realised that we had to up our game,” explains owner Martin Hunt.“We didn’t hesitate to go to Wogan [Coffee] for a barista-style machine and coffee. They provided us with excellent help, guidance and training, as well as great coffee, of course.”Being trained in the art of coffee-making is becoming an increasingly integral skill as competition in the coffee market grows, says Barry Kither, away-from-home sales and marketing director at Lavazza UK.He adds, however, that technology means it is now possible to serve barista-quality coffee without employing barista-qualified staff. Capsule-based solutions – the fastest-growing part of the Lavazza offer – means business can offer consistent quality in a cost-effective way, he claims.“In addition to this, the equipment Lavazza supplies has a temperature-controlled steam arm, which is a key element for non-specialists in the coffee sector as the milk foaming element is a tricky skill to master,” says Kither.Warings Bakery is currently sourcing a new supplier for its coffee and machines, a process it is taking great care with. “It’s a long process, as I’m finding out, with copious amounts of coffee drinking. Coffee is still on-trend and consumers know what they like,” says Carr.“We want to find a company that has the same values as ourselves and mirrors the care and quality of its product and services as we do.” 21st century snacking: popcorn, fruit and premium crispsSnacks have come a long way from shoppers grabbing a packet of salt and vinegar crisps to go with their lunchtime sausage roll.While there is still a role for standard crisps in the traditional popular flavours, snacking is being transformed by trends that are also impacting the wider bakery market: health and premiumisation.Vhari Russell, founder of The Food Marketing expert, suggests bakers offer a variety of products, such as popcorn, crisps, fruit snacks, and fruit.“It would be great to ensure you offer something different to stand out, and source locally if you can,” she says, advising businesses should avoid large minimum orders and consider using a distributor to reduce administration.Quality and provenance of ingredients has become all-important, according to Katy Hamblin, marketing manager of Pipers Crisps. “Consumers are actively seeking great-tasting snacks in preference to mediocre, commonplace fare whenever there’s a choice.The good news is that consumers are willing to pay more for the right snack. “For them, it’s not about the price; much more important is the value they get from the quality of the food and the brand itself,” says Hamblin. “This is excellent news for bakers and café owners as it creates an opportunity to make a real point of difference by premiumising your offer.”When it comes to health, Britain’s biggest crisps brand, Walkers, is tapping the trend with launches such as Sunbites Nut Mixes, containing dried fruit and nuts, as well as seasoned nut mixes, and Snack-a-Jacks mini rice cakes.Pipers, meanwhile, recently launched Pipers Crispeas, based on British peas that are naturally low in calories and a source of protein and fibre. “It is a must to offer healthier lines and products specific to kids,” says Russell. “It is important to offer variety and products to encourage healthier living.”Sales will be driven by stocking brands with a strong shelf presence, say suppliers.“Eye-catching packaging backed up by a dependable brand name and impeccable credentials are important,” says Hamblin, adding that branded point-of-sale materials and equipment can help to promote snacks.Russell suggests allowing shoppers to sample snacks to encourage purchase, and keeping merchandising simple, with wooden crates or baskets to display products near the counter.Rising to the challenge of gluten-freeThe gluten-free juggernaut shows no sign of slowing, with supermarket sales of gluten-free baked goods up 17.5% year-on-year in 2017 [Kantar Worldpanel]. And businesses are continuing to invest in the market, with Village Bakery just announcing development of a £12m free-from factory (see p4).But for a bakery hoping to take a slice of the burgeoning market for itself, there are major obstacles.“The problem with gluten-free products is that wheat gives you everything you need for baking,” says Małgorzata Gieblewicz, marketing manager at The Polish Bakery, adding that ensuring taste and quality were not compromised was a priority for the business when it expanded into gluten-free goods.“The process of gluten-free baking is much more complicated, so there is a technical challenge. To achieve similar results you need a mixture of starch, proteins and gluten-free flour, and finding the best possible certified suppliers was a time-consuming process.”As for the issue of cross-contamination with gluten-containing goods and ingredients, The Polish Bakery opted to produce its free-from bread in a separate facility, as many manufacturers do. In addition, the business has segregated storage areas, invested in specialist training for staff producing the free-from goods, and undertakes regular testing.Gail’s Bakery also has a dedicated facility for its gluten-free sourdough. The business adds that getting a good crust and great taste has proved difficult but has been achieved by using a blend of gluten-free flours.For many businesses, sourcing gluten-free products from a third party is the solution to catering for special dietary needs.“Our bought-in items include gluten-free bread and confectionery from a local family bakery with a specialist production room,” explains Martin Hunt of Joe’s Bakery in Bristol.But gluten-free isn’t for every business, as attested by Daniel Carr of Warings Bakery.“We have tried, on several occasions, to tap into the gluten-free market, but as we’re unable to produce this ourselves, we had to buy in product,” he says.“After several attempts, we came to the conclusion that consumers don’t consider their local family bakers on the high street as a gluten-free specialist, choosing dedicated gluten-free cafés, delis and bakeries or online retailers instead.”last_img read more

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Quail Sausage

first_imgSausage is traditionally made from pork, but a University of Georgia research team recently developed a breakfast link-style sausage made from lean quail meat.The new product was created in response to a need in the Georgia food industry. “About two years ago, we were approached by a quail meat processor for help in creating a product from quality quail breast meat trimmings,” said Anand Mohan, a food scientist in the Department of Food Science and Technology in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “A lot of (quail) breast meat trimmings go to waste, and they don’t know how to use it.”Mohan turned the request into a project for then-CAES undergraduate student Carla Reed, who was eager to accept the product development challenge. A graduate of Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Tucker, Georgia, Reed made the decision to return to college after working in the food industry for a few months.“I wanted to open my own restaurant, so I returned to school and UGA has the only food science program in Georgia,” she said. “I wanted to learn the science behind the food and I definitely got to do that through projects like this quail sausage.”In the past, meat processors attempted adding pork and beef fat to ground quail meat, but the resulting sausage “just didn’t taste good,” Mohan said. The UGA team’s challenge was to use quail meat trimmings, without adding another meat source, to create a product that tastes good and is accepted by consumers.After six months of trial and error and a number of different recipes, Reed created a maple-flavored quail link sausage developed specifically to appeal to children.“I had never even tried chicken sausage when we began working on the quail sausage project,” she said. “But I do remember loving maple-flavored pork sausage when I was a child.” Quail meat is naturally lean, so the UGA group fortified it with plant protein. The protein flour also increased the sausage’s fiber content. “We wanted to make the sausage more juicy and tasty, as well as packed with extra nutrition for children,” Mohan said. “It has almost 21 percent protein, 0.5 percent fiber, too, and it has a lot of minerals in it.”Most sausage products are high in fat, but quail meat does not contain lot of fat, he said. “You cannot develop a sausage without fat. However, we were able to develop a tasty product that does not have any added animal fat,” he said.With just 3 percent fat, the quail sausage is leaner than most sausages on the market, but Mohan says that the UGA-created quail sausage recipe still tastes amazingly like pork sausage. “I think it tastes more similar to pork. It doesn’t taste like chicken sausage at all,” he said.The quail sausage links created at UGA are recommended for children as well as adults in U.S. markets. The small size of the link and the maple flavoring led the team to make a connection to the children’s market. “In the end, we were able to produce a maple-flavored sausage that was rated as good as a standard sausage by the UGA students and workers we used as a taste panel,” Mohan said. “And we compared our quality sausage to one of the best chicken sausage products produced in the market.” The quail sausage links received high marks for “flavor, aroma and bite” by sensory panelists during taste tests at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Russell Research Center in Athens, Georgia, Mohan said.The second phase of the quail sausage study will determine if the product would be accepted in the marketplace.Reed, now a food technologist at Albertville Quality Foods in Albertville, Alabama, hopes the quail sausage product makes it into grocery stores and eventually lands on consumers’ tables, but she knows the odds are against it. “I’ve worked on several projects that have been approved and commercialized, but the fact is that less than half of new products launched are successful,” she said. “It’s a good product for parents who are health conscious. It is a lower-fat alternative to high-fat sausage patties and links, and it would be perfect for those who are allergic to soy protein.”last_img read more

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Rand Paul becomes first US senator diagnosed with coronavirus

first_imgSenators must be present to vote, and current rules don’t allow remote voting — although pressure is mounting for that to change.“The responsibility of the Senate is to remain open,” Senator Brian Schatz, Democrat of Hawaii, said on Twitter. “Remote voting must be instituted immediately.”Paul, 57, is feeling fine and isn’t aware of any direct contact with any infected person, his Twitter message said. Symptoms of the virus can include fever, coughing, and shortness of breath.A follow-up tweet said he expects to be back in the Senate after his quarantine period has ended, and that virtually no staff has had contact with the senator in the past 10 days, when his DC office began working remotely.Representative Mario Diaz-Balart, a Florida Republican, and Representative Ben McAdams, Democrat of Utah, last week both revealed they had been diagnosed as positive.The three join more than 31,000 other Americans known to have the virus, according to a running tally from Johns Hopkins University. Some 390 have died in the US Globally, cases have exceeded 328,000 with over 14,000 deaths.Paul was among a handful of Republican lawmakers on March 18 to oppose a $100 billion stimulus package to offset the impact of Covid-19 on the US economy. The measure was approved 90-8 and signed into law by President Donald Trump.Earlier this month, Paul was the lone vote against an $8 billion emergency spending package aimed at boosting funds for testing and lowering the cost of certain related medical treatments. He proposed an amendment that offset some of the costs of the legislation with cuts elsewhere, which was rejected.The senator’s father, former Texas Representative Ron Paul, has been one of final holdouts among coronavirus skeptics as the impact of the pandemic has broadened this month and state governments have ramped up their response.The 2012 Republican presidential candidate penned a column entitled “The Coronavirus Hoax,” dated March 16.“Governments love crises because when the people are fearful they are more willing to give up freedoms for promises that the government will take care of them,” the elder Paul wrote.He termed Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, “the chief fearmonger of the Trump administration.”Topics : Two other Republican US senators said they’ll go into self-quarantine after Rand Paul of Kentucky announced on Sunday that he’d tested positive for Covid-19.The moves by Senators Mike Lee and Mitt Romney of Utah have thrown a wrench into efforts by the Senate to pass a massive coronavirus economic stimulus package by Monday.Two other Republicans, Senator Cory Gardner of Colorado and Senator Rick Scott of Florida, have also been in self-quarantine in response to possible exposure to the virus from other infected individuals. Paul, who voted against two emergency coronavirus spending bills this month, tested positive for the virus and is in quarantine, according to a post on his Twitter account on Sunday.He’s the first US senator, and third member of Congress, known to have become infected. Lee subsequently said he would self-quarantine for 14 days — which means “no traveling or voting” — on the advice of the Attending Physician of the US Congress.Paul, the Kentucky lawmaker, was tested “out of an abundance of caution” due to his extensive travel and events, according to the tweet.Paul and Lee will miss a vote expected Monday on a bill to provide some $2 trillion in direct and indirect stimulus to the US economy as it reels from the widening effects of the pandemic.last_img read more

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Naman Tanwar, Neeraj Swami start on winning note

first_img COMMENT Written By First Published: 5th October, 2019 22:21 IST LIVE TV Press Trust Of India FOLLOW UScenter_img Commonwealth Games bronze-medallist Naman Tanwar was among the prominent names who made a winning start on the second day of 4th Elite National Boxing Championships here on Saturday.Last year’s bronze medal winner Naman (91kg), representing Railways, showed superb form and fitness to notch up a 5-0 win against Ashish Bhandor of Himachal Pradesh.Ashish was no match for his opponent as Naman landed a flurry of accurate punches to silence the local boxer.President’s Cup gold medallist Neeraj Swami (49 kg) also began his campaign in a dominant fashion against Meghalaya’s Phiban Sohtun. The diminutive boxer from Delhi attacked from the beginning and landed some mighty blows on his opponent’s face which forced the referee to stop the contest in the first round.India Open silver medallist Sumit Sangwan (91 kg), making a comeback, won his bout against Gujarat’s Rizwan Ahmed comfortably as the bout had to be stopped in the first round itself.Chandigarh’s Vipin Kumar (49kg) and Punjab’s Shiv Kant were involved in a highly entertaining bout as both the boxers traded punches and displayed great attacking prowess. But Vipin got the nod of the judges at the end with a 3-2 verdict.Assam’s Irfan Khan blanked Kerala’s Athul Raj 5-0 in the light flyweight category.After playing cautiously in the first round, Irfan showed quick movement and footwork to control the bout in the last two rounds.The pugilists will compete in all the ten weight categories — 49kg, 52kg, 57kg, 60kg, 63kg, 69kg, 75 kg, 81kg, 91kg and +91kg — as teams from Ladakh and Andaman and Nicobar are participating for the first time. WATCH US LIVE SUBSCRIBE TO US Last Updated: 5th October, 2019 22:21 IST Naman Tanwar, Neeraj Swami Start On Winning Note Commonwealth Games bronze-medallist Naman Tanwar was among the prominent names who made a winning start on the second day of 4th Elite National Boxing Championslast_img read more

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