Dina Asher-Smith already preparing for Olympic success after gold in Doha

first_imgTwitter: follow us at @guardian_sportFacebook: like our football and sport pagesInstagram: our favourite photos, films and storiesYouTube: subscribe to our football and sport channels Asher-Smith also paid tribute to her parents and Blackie, who has guided her career since she began training at the age of eight. “Even when I was little and I would try to jump over hurdles and do the long jump he said ‘please watch yourself’. He told me we could do some special things. He’s been careful with my progression to hold me back. This medal is dedicated to his patience, intelligence and wisdom.” Was this helpful? … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on Messenger Dina Asher-Smith wins world 200m gold to make history for Great Britain Share on WhatsApp Share on LinkedIn Photograph: Chesnot/Getty Images Europe Athletics “The Olympics is less than a year away so we’ve already been thinking about it,” she said. “But my coach John Blackie and I still have some things to work on. In the 100m I didn’t run the race I planned. I am still getting stronger and more experience physically and mentally. So hopefully there is more to come and it should be an exciting journey.”Asher-Smith’s victory has propelled her into the stratosphere of British sport but afterwards she promised global success would not change her.“Not really because being an athlete is very humbling anyway,” she said. “I train six days a week and I am still going to push myself to the limit. It’s very unglamorous when you’ve got lactic [acid], and you’re on the floor. Ultimately you’re only ever as good as your last performance.”She added: “Athletics is a very unpredictable and at times unforgiving sport.“I could run the same time next year and finish fifth in the Olympics – that’s just how it goes. So I have to really keep my feet firmly on the ground and keep working hard.” Since you’re here… Team GB Thank you for your feedback. Dina Asher-Smith believes that her stunning world 200m victory can be a springboard to Olympic glory next year – and expects to get even stronger and faster for Tokyo. She became the first British woman to win a global sprint title with a dominant display in Doha, charging home in 21.88sec to take gold and break her own national record in the process. It was her second medal of these championships to go with her silver in the 100m. But when the 23-year-old was asked whether it meant she was the finished article, she shook her head. Topics World Athletics Championships Share on Pinterest Share via Email Olympic Games Hide Dina Asher-Smith Read more news Show Tokyo Olympic Games 2020 Reuse this content Quick guide Follow Guardian sport on social media Share on Twitter Support The Guardian Share on Facebooklast_img read more

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