Mutually beneficial

first_imgThe success of Britain’s bakery sector is built around a strong, mutually beneficial relationship with the major supermarkets.Last week, on these pages, it was reported that a recent survey of UK food suppliers had revealed that 83% of company directors expected to see more firms within their sector go out of business. Much of the blame for this, according to Grant Thornton, the company which carried out the survey, rests with the big supermarkets. Rubbish!Earlier this year, the Competition Commission, reporting on its exhaustive and continuing investigation into the grocery sector, stated that there was “little evidence of any ongoing decline in profits” for manufacturers and processors.In fact, on the three occasions over the past eight years that the Commission has investigated the grocery sector, it has failed to unearth any evidence to support claims that retailers are using their position to profit at the expense of their suppliers. The scale economies arising from increasing market shares have been passed on to consumers in lower prices and product innovation.It is somewhat surprising, then, that Grant Thornton, from a survey of just 50 suppliers, has been able to draw such simplistic conclusions about the state of the grocery market and the relationship between retailers and their suppliers. The reality is that the majority of suppliers enjoy mutually advantageous working relationships with supermarkets.Indeed, the Competition Commission’s own, much more extensive survey of suppliers suggests that supply relationships are generally positive, with 94% of respondents saying they believe they will still be in business in five years’ time and 80% saying they have been able to invest in their businesses in the past two years. That is not indicative of a supply chain breaking under pressure. In the bakery market, the share of retailers’ own-brand products in total sales has been halted and reversed by the big manufacturers, through product individuality and aggressive marketing.Supermarkets know that if they put their suppliers under pressure, it restricts investment and stifles innovation, which is why they aim to foster long-term constructive relationships.One of the things the bakery sector has been able to do well in recent years is innovate to meet the changing tastes of consumers. Bakers were among the swiftest to recognise and react to consumers’ growing interest in health and nutrition, developing new brands and premium and speciality product lines to meet the demand for something different. Super- markets have supported and encouraged this strategy.The supermarkets’ main aim is to serve their customers, which is best done by creating a viable, innovative and competitive supply chain. This is the only way to deliver the choice, quality and innovation that consumers demand.There will always be arguments between supermarkets and their suppliers over terms and conditions, as there are in all supply chains, but supermarkets recognise that treating suppliers badly is bad business, which is why both parties seek, and generally enjoy, mutually beneficial relationships. nlast_img read more

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Juuso Pasanen provides steady hand to Syracuse midfield in final season

first_img Related Stories Julian Buescher operates from defensive position in wake of Juuso Pasanen’s injurySyracuse tests depth in win over Wolfpack Published on November 2, 2015 at 9:55 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @ChrisLibonati Juuso Pasanen laid on the wet grass with his hands on his head and trainers examining his leg.Zero goals, three assists and the least points of any starter are what Syracuse lost when he came out of the game against Hartford on Oct. 20. His production wasn’t what made him so valuable. The player that became punctual and had grown into a leader this past year was what SU nearly lost.“If you’d ask the seniors when I was a freshman, I honestly didn’t think I was ever going to be a captain of the team here,” Pasanen said.The senior defensive midfielder may play his last game at SU Soccer Stadium on Wednesday. The injury against Hartford put the rest of his season in doubt — SU head coach Ian McIntyre constantly said he was day-to-day — but Pasanen was able to play against Boston College last Friday. As recently as SU’s game against North Carolina State on Oct. 23, Pasanen had worn a walking boot.He is one of three captains, and teammates say he provides a steady hand guiding SU in the back of offensive sets. Pasanen had to grow up early, moving from Finland to Switzerland and leaving behind where he was born.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“He’s a calming influence on our team,” McIntyre said.Pasanen found out he was moving after he came home from a soccer practice and his mother told him his dad had been offered a job in Switzerland. His father flew there and stayed for a month. Pasanen’s parents deliberated about having his mother and he and his siblings stay in Finland, but ultimately they decided to go as a family.The Swiss Airlines plane dropped among the Alps, a rare sight to Pasanen because Finland is mostly flat, he said. “Clarity,” by John Mayer vibrated in his ears as it finally hit him that the move was real.He and his family moved approximately the distance from Syracuse to Los Angeles when they moved near Hunenberg, Switzerland from Kuopio, Finland. He played for FC Zurich’s club team and attended the International School of Zug and Luzern.In Finland, kids start school a year later than in most other parts of the world. When Pasanen moved to Switzerland, he started hanging out with kids in the 10th grade, one grade higher than him.“In a way I felt like I was more mature than kids in my grade,” Pasanen said.He was allowed to skip a grade to take classes with the older kids he had already been hanging out with. Pasanen’s older siblings had come to the United States for an exchange-student program, with one traveling to Boston and the other to Chicago. They dropped a grade below, so he also was able to jump up to their’s.At Zug and Luzern, some kids had parents that worked at an embassy, so Pasanen learned not to get attached because some friends were there one week and gone the next.Even though he said the first move helped him adjust at SU, he admits he wasn’t quite ready. Moving from Switzerland to Syracuse was double the distance from Finland to Switzerland.“Back then I moved with my family, now I moved alone,” Pasanen said. “So it was more of a responsibility.”He said some of the little things have improved like being on time and that he was “noisy all the time like an excited, new, young kid.” The maturity has come with the responsibility of being an older player on the team. Twelve players left Syracuse after last season to play professionally, graduate or transfer, two of which would have been seniors.In the offseason, he had meetings with McIntyre and the other coaches, Liam Callahan and Oyvind Alseth. He knew he had to grow as a captain.“You can go to him if you need that (calming influence),” freshman Andreas Jenssen said.Alseth says sometimes Pasanen’s laid-back mentality can be mistaken for laziness. Even though he’s become one of the leaders, he still has kept some of the tendencies from when he wasn’t regarded that way.There’s still the locker room jokes and sarcasm even though some of his teammates don’t get it. Sometimes it’s just Pasanen and Korab Syla that understand their own band of sarcasm with some jokes not suitable for print.“I’m mature, right?” Pasanen said to Ben Polk, who walked by.“Of course, mate,” Polk joked as he smiled. Commentscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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