Reed Mathis & Electric Beethoven Share 21 Minute Compilation Of Straight Improv From Denver Show

first_imgReed Mathis & Electric Beethoven are one of the most unique groups to come out of 2016. The collective efforts of bassist Reed Mathis, keyboardist Todd Stoops, drummer Jay Lane, and guitarist Clay Welch create the foundation for the world’s first “Classical Dance Music” project. Reimagining Beethoven symphonies to a new generation of live music lovers, the band has been traveling the country to spread some serious musical explorations of the modernized material.Today, they’ve shared something quite special. A song they call “Thunderstorm” is defined as a passage from the fourth movement of Beethoven’s sixth symphony, “tranced the funk out for a dance exploration and meditation improvisation.” What Reed Mathis has done with this recent Denver recording is even more interesting.He explains in a Facebook post, “So, in my Beethoven band we have this one tune where it’s one long chord progression that we can move through at any pace we like, and we just make up riffs and ornaments through repetition, sort of like crickets talking. The recording of us doing this in Denver was 44 minutes long. ‘Just for the hell of it,’ I wondered, ‘what would happen if I remove the transitional bits, and just string together all the improvised riffs using only the parts where they had solidified?’ So, I spent a couple hours last night editing that 44 minute performance down to 21 minutes. Pretty crazy! Fascinating to hear our collective-improvised negotiations go from stepping-stone to stepping-stone so quickly. Plus, Beet’s chord progression is definitely non-shitty. Freakin’ unique little band I’ve got here.” Indeed!Check out the 21 minute compilation of improvisational material from Reed Mathis & Electric Beethoven at Cervantes below:last_img read more

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Yankees’ Aaron Boone complained to umpires about noise from Phillies fans in empty stadium

first_imgPitcher Jordan Montgomery didn’t have a complaint about the fans, but did say the Phillies announcers were being loud.Jordan Montgomery was not happy with the noise coming from the Phillies announcers.”I heard yesterday that their announcers were being really loud mid-pitch during JA and other guys’ pitches and not doing the same for their team.”pic.twitter.com/oSqzgroOTM— Ryan Field (@RyanFieldABC) August 7, 2020As for the Phillies themselves, the players seemed to enjoy the noise.“It’s nice to hear something even if they are quite far away. They had the horn going pretty well tonight and I heard a few of their chants,” J.T. Realmuto said. “It’s fun to get a little bit of fans out there. It’s better than listening to silence. It definitely doesn’t hurt. It’s nice to hear something out there and hear that support. It’s better to have them out there than not.” Yankees manager Aaron Boone was not pleased with Phillies fans, even if his team was playing in front of an empty crowd.Boone was seen complaining to umpires during Thursday’s game between the two teams, and the broadcast crew assumed he was upset with the noise from fans outside. Those fans are known as The Phandemic Krew, named after the pandemic hitting the country right now and the son of Bryce Harper (Krew). The fans have caused quite a bit of noise since the start of the MLB season. At one point they had a drum line, and during Thursday’s Yankees game they were using an airhorn.Yankees manager Aaron Boone is apparently NOT a fan of the airhorn that Phillies’ fans have outside the ballpark and complained. 😂 pic.twitter.com/tafCDeqLkZ— NBC Sports Philadelphia (@NBCSPhilly) August 6, 2020MORE: A’s bench coach apologizes for Nazi saluteAfter the game, Boone admitted he had a discussion with the umpires over the noise.”It sounded like a horn was going off as the pitch [was being thrown]. And you know, in the environment we’re in, it’s almost like a golf environment where that sudden thing can … So I thought there was a timing element to it,” Boone said. “I didn’t necessarily think they would be able to do anything about it. I didn’t necessarily know who or where it was coming from, but it was something I at least wanted to point out.”MORE: Blue Jays forced to remove pitcher who wasn’t on umpires’ lineup cardBoone added the umpires said they couldn’t really do anything unless they saw fans actually in the ballpark. Baseball players, and athletes in general, are used to crowd noise, but there is a difference when someone is blowing an airhorn. There’s a reason (actually a few reasons) why fans can’t bring airhorns inside the ballpark. But since the stadium is empty, the airhorns from outside the ballpark are able to be heard much clearer.Yankees outfielder Mike Tauchman also said he could hear the noise from fans.”You could hear it. It was pretty loud,” Tauchman said earlier in the week. “Philadelphia is known for having a pretty passionate fan base and those guys want to find a way to support their team even though they can’t be in the stadium and that’s how they chose to show their fandom tonight.”last_img read more

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