Travellers get unfair benefits by having ethnic status – Casey

first_img Twitter Google+ By News Highland – October 24, 2018 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Twitter Presidential hopeful Peter Casey says travellers get unfair financial benefits by having ethnic status. He made the claims during last night’s television debate between all the candidates.Mr Casey’s remarks sparked criticism from Senator Joan Freeman and others:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/prebhjmkhjkhjkhjkhjsmix.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Facebook Facebook Travellers get unfair benefits by having ethnic status – Casey News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th center_img Pinterest WhatsApp Google+ Previous articleDonegal Gold goes on display at National Museum of IrelandNext articleHigh-level US delegation visit North West News Highland DL Debate – 24/05/21 WhatsApp FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic AudioHomepage BannerNews Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODAlast_img read more

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Professor named AERA fellow

first_imgThe American Educational Research Association (AERA) recently named Notre Dame sociology professor Mark Berends a fellow in recognition of his scholarly contributions to education research. Berends was accepted as one of 22 members of the association’s class of 2014, which is currently composed of 557 AERA fellows. He will also act as the program director for this year’s AERA meeting, a conference with more than 2,400 presentations and dozens of features of leading researchers in education.“Part of this AERA fellows is recognizing people that have had a long history of research that is informative and helpful to the field, so I’m very humbled by it,” Berends said. “It’s a great honor. “AERA is an organization with some 25,000 people — there’s a whole array of people that do work like I do and people that do other work, so one never knows how they’re going to get recognized in that.”The AERA fellows are selected on the basis of sustained excellence over a long period of time, and Berends said his career began at the RAND corporation, an independent objective “think tank” that does research to inform policy. He said that’s where he began applying sociology to educational reform, and learning to work on large team-based research projects with significant policy implications. “When I was there at the time there was a policy movement called ‘comprehensive school reform’ — that they would redo schools, [with the idea] that our schools are terrible, we’re not competitive in the world, we need to break the mold,” Berends said. A large project was conducted over several years in the 1990s that examined new designs for schools, he said. “That work stood the test of time in some ways, and other people tried to replicate it,” Berends said. “It was very mixed because they were trying to develop these new designs for schools, but then they were basically selling their products to school districts which have certain constraints and regulations, and so instead of ‘break the mold’ ideas, it became more ‘fill the mold.’”While at RAND, Berends said he researched test score trends in different demographics and examined family changes and schooling situations of students. This eventually led to an appointment at Vanderbilt’s Peabody School of Education.“That [appointment] played into some of that work and also comprehensive school choice where we were fortunate enough to get a big research center funded by the U.S. Department of Education, to look at school choice, whether that’s charter schooling, home schooling, scholarships or vouchers, a whole array of these kinds of choices,” Berends said. “We looked not just at differences in test scores, but whether these schools were really different: was the organization different, was the instruction different, was the teaching force different?”Now at Notre Dame, Berends acts as the Director of the Center for Research on Educational Opportunity (CREO), part of the Institute for Educational Initiatives. His research continues to focus on school choice and educational policy, with a couple of projects currently underway.“One is that Indiana has implemented a choice scholarship program, a voucher, for low and modest income families to take money to attend a private school,” Berends said. “We have a data-sharing agreement with Indiana Department of Education, and we’re looking at the early effects of that on state test scores. Not only public schools, but a lot of the private schools [also] take state tests so it’s a nice comparison.”Although Berends is using shared data, he also supplements more traditional metrics with a comprehensive approach including interviewing and tracking student integration and social networks.“A lot of my work over time is not only looking at test scores, which sometimes tend to be a horse race, but more ‘what are the conditions under which schools can be effective, whatever the type’ — whether that’s a Catholic school, a charter school and so on,” Berends said. “We’re always trying to get more information, whether that’s through quantitative or qualitative measures.”Tags: AERA Fellowlast_img read more

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Long Island Teens Turn 9/11 Grief Into Positivity & Empowerment

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Juliette Scauso transformed her bereavement into empowerment following a retreat with 60 young adults brought together in the most heartbreaking of ways—all lost a family member to an act of terrorism.Project Common Bond, as the symposium that includes young adults from around the world is called, was organized by Manhasset-based nonprofit Tuesday’s Children, which serves the sons and daughters of those killed in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.“The opportunity to be part of such a wonderful and empowering program has been life changing for me,” said Scauso, of Melville, who was 4 years old when her father—a firefighter—died on 9/11. “I want to help heal, and to bond with others who feel the way I do.”Launched in 2008, Project Common Bond involves young adults from Algeria, France, India, Indonesia, Israel, Kenya, Macedonia, Northern Ireland, Pakistan, Palestine, Spain, as well as Americans who lost a family member on 9/11, and children of military personnel killed in post-9/11 active duty. This year, 27 Americans participated, including seven from Manhasset.“They asked this program to be initiated because they wanted to learn more about people from all over the world who go through the same tragedy and circumstances,” notes Danielle Coon, the director of programs at Tuesday’s Children.The young adults, who are reminded of their loss on the anniversary of the attacks, shared their unshakable pain and traumatic grief with one another, embracing dramatic differences and transcending language boundaries.“For these teenagers, the sudden, violent and public nature of their loss becomes an overwhelming and defining characteristic of their lives,” said Terry Sears, executive director of Tuesday’s Children. “Project Common Bond helps them turn their personal tragedy into strength and create positive change within themselves and their communities.”Matt Jordan, from Westhampton, returned to the international project for a fourth year, and walked away thankful for the global perspective.“Project Common Bond has allowed me not only to meet new people from across the world, but to enrich my understanding of foreign cultures and experience firsthand the impacts of international affairs,” he said. “I now have a more mature outlook onto other cultures and I have developed a greater understanding of the issues that impact the lives of their people.”He noted how a Middle Eastern participant shared a large notebook she used to document extremist violence and its aftermath in her community.During their eight days spent at Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania from July 26 through August 3, campers participated in therapeutic group work, leadership sessions, conflict resolution and peace-building projects, as well as team events designed to foster trust, healing and communication. The initiative also had participants in a daylong adventure-based expedition run.The camp curriculum was designed by Harvard Law School’s Negotiation and Mediation Clinical Program and incorporated the Dignity Model, designed by Donna Hicks of the Weatherhead Center of International Affairs. The model’s core principles stress engagement in dialogue, a fundamental tenet of treating humans with dignity.“What has shaped me as an individual is the idea that you cannot fight hate with more hatred, that it will only add fuel to the fire,” Scauso said. “Knowing what it is like to have a loved one taken from you by inhumane acts of others is what fuels me in the fight against terrorism.”last_img read more

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