The Battle of the Food Documentaries: Truth vs. Fiction

first_img Facebook Twitter The Battle of the Food Documentaries: Truth vs. Fiction Facebook Twitter Farmland is a documentary produced by award winning director, James Moll. It features the real life stories of six young farmers. It portrays their lives, livelihoods, struggles, and opinions.  While these producers were handpicked, the filming process was pretty straight forward. Moll and his crew showed up on their farms and followed them around as they went about the business of farming. Moll told me he wanted to focus on the people not the politics. I asked him if there were things he had to cut out to deliver a message the sponsors wanted. He said no, there was nothing he had to edit or remove from the film.  The film was underwritten by the US Farmers and Ranchers Alliance, a coalition of the nation’s largest farm and commodity organizations.  This project came about in response to movies like Food Inc and others, which painted a very negative and one-sided picture of modern agriculture and the food production system. Previous articleBeef Price Spike, Still a MysteryNext articleFed Up Film Debuts, Food Industry Responds Gary Truitt While farmland was in production, another film was being produced called Fed Up. This film was produced by Laurie David, whose credits include the documentary Inconvenient Truth. In the director’s own words, this film “Inspires people to make changes in their lives and in our food environment.” It does this by playing fast and loose with the truth, making outrageous and unsubstantiated claims, and scaring people into changing what they eat. The film is packed with liberal and radical celebrities including Mark Bittman, Michael Pollan, former President Bill Clinton, and Senator Tom Harkin. The film is narrated by Katie Couric, who lost all her journalistic integrity during the last election. The Center for Science in the Public Interest, an organization that has been behind some of the largest food hoaxes and scare in American history, is featured prominently in the film. SHARE SHARE Unlike Farmland  which tells a story and lets the audience make up its own mind, Fed Up crams its pre-formed ideas down your throat. Some of the more outrageous statements made in the movie include: “Sugar is like cocaine, you become an addict;” “This is the first generation of American children expected to lead shorter lives than their parents;” “95%of all Americans will be overweight or obese in 2 decades;” “We are toast as a country.” These statements and claims are all delivered with the solemn, smug certainty that all radicals use when they have no proof to substantiate their claims.  Fed Up is the same old fear message, delivered by the same old tired  blowhards. The battle of public opinion on agriculture and our food supply has moved from the computer screen to the big screen. This summer, consumers have will have two documentaries to chose from that deal with our food supply, our diet, and our health. Playing in theatres currently are the movies Farmland and Fed Up. These are two diametrically opposed viewpoints, presented in two very different ways.  Both claim to deliver the truth, but one will use reality and the other will use fear.  After viewing one you will feel comforted and positive, the other will make you scared and angry. In the end, who will be the winner? Never before have consumers had a more clear and definitive example of the two different messages being delivered about food and agriculture. I hope people see both films, so they can get a true picture of American farmers as well as a true picture of the shallow and bankrupted arguments of those who want to restrict what we eat and to put a good portion of the food industry out of business. By Gary Truitt Home Commentary The Battle of the Food Documentaries: Truth vs. Fiction By Gary Truitt – May 11, 2014 last_img read more

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Cigarette packet branding to face consultation

first_img 9 Views   no discussions Sharing is caring! The government wants smokers to give up their habitThe government is considering plans to strip all branding from cigarette packs sold in England in a bid to make smoking appear less attractive.Health Secretary Andrew Lansley told the Times the government did not work with tobacco companies as it wanted them to have “no business” in the UK.He said 5% of 11 to 15-year-olds were regular smokers and the habit led to nearly 100,000 deaths in the UK yearly.The government is to launch its consultation on the issue on Monday.Vending machine banIn a statement, Mr Lansley said: “Smoking remains one of the most significant challenges to public health. “Each year it accounts for over 100,000 deaths in the UK and one in two long-term smokers will die prematurely from a smoking disease. “That is why the health ministers across the UK have a responsibility to look closely at initiatives that might encourage smokers to quit and stop young people taking up smoking in the first place. “Through the forthcoming consultation we want to hear as many views as possible about whether tobacco packing should remain unchanged, plain packaging should be adopted or a different option should be considered.” A ban on tobacco displays in large shops started earlier this month, and smaller shops will have to follow suit by 2015.The move comes after bans on vending machine sales, increasing the age at which a person can legally buy cigarettes and the ban on smoking in public places.‘Attractive’ packagingAustralia is currently the only country which has so far agreed to plain packaging. Its ban starts at the end of this year, although it is subject to a legal challenge by manufacturers.Packets will be a dark olive green, after the public was asked what the least attractive colour was.Research published in Australia has suggested that cigarette packets have increasingly become an important marketing tool as restrictions on advertising and sponsorship have been brought in.Mr Lansley told the Times he was open-minded, but that he believed attractive packaging helped recruit smokers from a young age.More than 300,000 children aged under 16 in England try smoking each year, according to government figures.The consultation will also examine if plain packaging could lead to a rise in cigarette packets being sold on the black market.Mr Lansley said the tobacco companies used certain colours to trigger memories and their brands constituted a type of advertising.“We don’t want to work in partnership with the tobacco companies because we are trying to arrive at a point where they have no business in this country,” he added.Counterfeiting ‘risk’The consultation document is expected to suggest that branded tobacco packets create “smoker identity”, with certain brands seen as “cool” and “popular”, the paper reported.It is also expected to say that tobacco firms use colours and logos to boost their profits.The Tobacco Manufacturers’ Association said it “welcomed” the consultation.But Jane Chisholm-Caunt, secretary-general of the TMA, said: “There is no reliable evidence plain packaging will reduce rates of youth smoking.“Smoking initiation in children is actually linked to a complex range of socio-economic factors including home life, peer pressure and truancy and exclusion from school.”And she warned plain packaging would only serve to make counterfeiting cigarettes easier.Simon Clark, director of the smokers’ group Forest which runs the “Hands Off Our Packs” campaign, added: “The consultation on plain packaging threatens to be a farce. “Andrew Lansley says he is open minded yet he clearly supports plain packaging even before the consultation has begun.”Smoking rates have fallen significantly since the link with cancer was established beyond doubt in the 1950s.But it recent years the decline has slowed with the number of adult smokers hovering above the 21% for some time.Ministers have promised to reduce this to 18.5% by 2015.BBC News Tweet Sharecenter_img Share HealthLifestyle Cigarette packet branding to face consultation by: – April 14, 2012 Sharelast_img read more

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Best sits out captain’s run

first_imgThe hooker has a stomach bug but as of yet has not been ruled out of tomorrows’ match.A slow start cost Joe Schmidt’s side last week against Scotland but former Munster and Ireland forward Tipperary man Alan Quinlan doesn’t expect the same mistakes to be repeated this time around.Meanwhile, Ireland’s U20s face Italy in the Six Nations this evening – the match at the Stadio Enrico Chersoni in Prato begins at 6 o’clock.last_img

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