The Other Half of the 5G Story

first_img5G is not just about building a new telecom network or standard – that’s only half the story. What about the story of how telecom is intersecting with other industries, industrial plants, transport infrastructure companies, oil fields and ships, all of whom are leveraging 5G and LTE technology, to transform their business models? Picture everything from oil rigs in the North Sea reporting their daily yield back to base, search and rescue missions at sea, companies connecting buildings for efficient energy usage, and industrial plants making medicines.Smart factoriesAs a case in point, ABB Power Grids – who provide solutions to meet the growing demand for electricity with minimum environmental impact – is now using the 5G-ready Ericsson Industry Connect solution (based on the Virtual Edge Platform 4600) in a shop floor production environment at its factory in Sweden. The advantages are clear: low latency, a robust and secure private network, efficient and improved production quality, plus increased flexibility in the maintenance and upgrade of production lines.Opening up new possibilitiesIt’s clear from this example that while 5G is a huge enabler in its own right, it’s also advancing the already strong trend towards IT and OT convergence, serving as the glue to connect diverse technologies on the factory floor with everything from edge computing, predictive maintenance and vision-based quality systems through to machine learning and Artificial Intelligence. Over the last four years, Dell Technologies has been working to build the most comprehensive ecosystem of partners in order to solve business challenges for customers in different vertical industries across a range of use cases. All these solutions run on top of our Industrial IoT/data architecture, built for scale-up with predictable cost.As we couple all this with 5G technology, we start to access a whole new world of data possibilities and business insights. Imagine the power of combining autonomous vehicles for material transport on the factory floor or mine, cameras on the conveyor belt, a drone to inspect the quality of parts, IoT data from the sensors on the production line, plus structured telemetry data from control systems, all interlinked through a 5G mobile network.Uniting expertiseI believe that designing and delivering these next-generation communication networks demands a range of expertise from multiple partners working together. To address this need, Dell Technologies Design Solutions has structured its organization to work with both the leading communications infrastructure providers and the largest industrial companies, all under one “OEM G20” team umbrella. In this way, we’re bringing together expertise in telecoms, IoT, IT infrastructure and industrial automation.As we have the same teams working with both industries, we can support both sides in their 5G ambitions, helping to design the right communications infrastructure and ensuring its subsequent deployment into industry. This puts us in a wonderful position to support innovation in the first instance, and importantly ensure that is made quickly available to industry.Partnership will determine the futureI hope that our shared work will influence other industries and help accelerate 5G and LTE deployments around the globe. In turn, that should help drive broader innovation as the more we can automate and seamlessly interlink technologies, the more time we all have available to develop new products and services. While it’s impossible to predict all the possible solutions that might emerge, I believe that having an open and responsive ecosystem to help deploy that ingenuity is critical.How are you deploying 5G in your company? Do share your stories. Interested in learning more? Take the first step and contact us today. Learn more about Telecom Solutions from Dell Technologies Design Solutions.Learn more about IT/OT Convergence in the 5G arena by listening to a recorded editorial webinar, hosted by RCR Wireless News here.Follow us on Twitter @DellTechDesign and join our LinkedIn Dell Technologies Design Solutions Showcase page here.last_img read more

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Premier League spot up for grabs on Championship final day

first_imgBy Simon EvansMANCHESTER, England (Reuters) – A place in the Premier League is up for grabs today, with three teams in the chase for the second automatic promotion spot from the Championship on the final day of the second-tier season.Leeds United have already secured a return to the top flight after a 16-year absence. But West Bromwich Albion, Brentford and Fulham all have a chance of grabbing the runners-up spot and the lucrative prize it brings.The third promotion place is decided via a four-team playoff, with those slots also to be finalised by today’s action.Adding to the drama, all three relegation places have yet to be confirmed with Hull City, a Premier League club three years ago, currently bottom. West Brom are favourites to be holding a socially distanced promotion party, with Slaven Bilic’s side currently occupying second place.The Baggies know that victory at home to 14th-placed Queens Park Rangers will guarantee them a return to the elite after a two-year absence.But if the West Midlands side slip up, then the door is open for one of the two London clubs to sneak in on the final day.Brentford would be back in the top flight for the first time since 1947 if they beat Barnsley at home and West Brom fail to win. Should neither West Brom nor Brentford win then Fulham, who dropped out of the Premier League last season, would be back if they can win at Wigan Athletic.The consolation for the two teams that miss out today will be a second chance via the playoff.Nottingham Forest and Cardiff City are currently fifth and sixth but must win today to make sure of their place in the two-leg playoff semi-final, and potentially the final itself at Wembley on July 29. Seventh-placed Swansea are lingering and still in with a slim chance of making it. A win for the Swans at Reading would only be enough if Cardiff lose at home to bottom club Hull.Fifth-placed Forest, who are at home to Stoke, have the best goal difference but will be keen to get at least a point to make sure of their place.Two-time European Cup winners Forest have not been in the top flight since 1999.Seven teams still have a mathematical chance of being relegated. Barnsley and Luton are currently in the drop-zone along with Hull, while Charlton Athletic, Birmingham City, Middlesbrough and Huddersfield are still not safe. Only three points separate 22nd-placed Luton from Huddersfield in 18th. Leeds United’s players huddle up before the match, as play resumes behind closed doors following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). (Action Images/Carl Recine)last_img read more

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The life of a Syracuse men’s basketball student manager

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 12, 2018 at 4:37 pm Contact Matthew: [email protected] | @MatthewGut21 The only student manager who sits on the Syracuse bench during games has one job far more important than the others: get Jim Boeheim his stool and clipboard.An SU senior and head student manager, Ricky Pasternak’s primary duty on game day is to show up on time. It is to ensure Boeheim has his clipboard and stool during timeouts. And it is to complete one other task vital to the routine of Syracuse’s 42-year head coach: hand Boeheim his Pepsi during halftime and after the game.Student managers are rarely credited for their efforts, reacting like a NASCAR pit crew during timeouts to set up chairs and distribute water bottles and towels. That’s just what casual fans might see if they’re paying close enough attention. What they don’t see is the nearly 40-hour weeks that managers log, setting up practices, rebounding, laying out cones, cleaning up, doing laundry and throwing towels on players’ shoulders when they take a breather. They don’t see the managers hauling luggage onto planes and buses in the wee hours, cutting film or running Syracuse’s camps during the summer.“In a way, they’re holding the program together,” said Kip Wellman, SU’s director of basketball operations and Boeheim’s right-hand man.The grunt work, members of the program said, is hardly recognizable, yet it’s what stitches together the whole entity. And unlike just about every other Syracuse student, the managers won’t get time off over spring break. Many of them will remain in Syracuse or travel with the Orange (20-13, 8-10 Atlantic Coast) for its game Wednesday night in the First Four against Arizona State.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textStudent managers are at the low end of the basketball food chain, but they are vital to Syracuse. The menial jobs are coveted. There are about 20 to 30 applicants per year, said CB Garrett, a manager who is a junior at SU. About five each year make the cut, after the other applicants are sifted out via a 15-minute interview. Most students who become managers have their eye on a future career in sports.For many of the 20 or so student managers on this year’s team, becoming a student manager was a dream as early as high school. Garrett said there are already about 10 high school seniors who have contacted SU’s managers inquiring about the application process. Around the first week of classes, interviews are held in the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center, where managers spend much of their time when not in class or on the road with the team.“Before my sophomore or junior year of high school, I knew I wanted to be a basketball manager,” said Garrett, who stopped by the basketball office when he visited SU. “You’re getting kids like me who really want to do it, because you don’t get a ton of sleep on the road and you don’t get to see your family much.”Garrett said he has been home all of three days since the start of the school year in August. That’s not uncommon, given that about four managers travel to road games, while the others assist with game day preparation for home games and daily practices.“If we don’t have class, we’re supposed to be at practice,” said Nick Giancola, a freshman student manager. “We set up the water cart, make sure the basketballs are out, rebound. You name it.”Courtesy of CB GarrettGiancola is Boeheim’s nephew, a relationship he said helped him land the gig at SU. He “really wants to play” college hoops and is “not quite giving up on that dream.” Having access to the Melo Center from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m., he said, gives him time to work on his game. He may consider trying to walk-on at Syracuse, like former manager and current SU reserve Patrick Herlihy.For years, Giancola has been interested in sports, ever since he was a little kid growing up in Lexington, Kentucky, and took informal basketball lessons from Wellman. Giancola’s connection with Boeheim and Wellman led to him to be a student manager at Syracuse over Ohio State, he said.One of a manager’s most basic and most important tasks is rebounding. There is an art they must learn. On a single basket before or after practice, three managers, ideally, rebound for a single player: one person in front of the shooter, one under the basket and one guy floating around, judging the trajectory of the shots and anticipating where the rebound may go.“Rebounding, it’s like the No. 1 thing we have to master,” Giancola said.That’s during practice, hardly where the real work begins. Syracuse starts most practices at 4 p.m. But Garrett shows up around 2 p.m. to help set up and he doesn’t leave until 7 p.m. He stays after practice to assists players in getting extra work, or he completes shot charts. On home gamedays, for a 7 p.m. tip, he arrives at Melo around 2 p.m. ahead of a 2:30 team meeting. Then managers head to the Carrier Dome around 3 p.m. and stick around until 10:30 that evening.When SU’s bigs work out, managers play so-called dummy defense. At 6-foot-4, 185 pounds, Garrett said he is the biggest manager at SU, meaning he matches up with the bigs. He’s learned the art of holding a pad to mimic a defender while applying good resistance. He tore the labrum in his right shoulder last summer during a similar drill.Save for access to players and the game, the hidden gem of managing may be pick-up hoops. They can play virtually anytime in Melo with the swipe of their SUID. Three or four days per week, Garrett said a few managers play with assistant coach Gerry McNamara and assistant strength and conditioning coach Eric Devendorf, both former Syracuse standouts. Over winter break, Syracuse commit Buddy Boeheim joined in.But after the fun, after practices and after games, comes one of the more dreaded tasks: laundry duty. A handful of managers have stayed after practice for three or four additional hours to complete several loads of laundry.“Laundry is never the most fun thing,” Garrett said. “Takes almost three hours a day. The worst part is you can’t start until everyone leaves. All the guys, they’ll shoot, go in weight room, then shower. Only after everyone showers can you start the laundry.”Before home games, managers set up the water jugs on a white Gatorade crate on wheels. They prepare cups, tissues and lots of gum. Garrett has lost three jacket buttons trying to reach for water during games. During practice, they almost always have a towel over their shoulder in the case that a player falls. They wipe that spot on the floor to rid the sweat, another way in which managers ensure things run smoothly.“If the program’s a car,” junior point guard Frank Howard said, “they’re like the oil.” Commentslast_img read more

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