Ambrose seeking to fire-up underdogs WI

first_imgHOBART, Australia (CMC):Fast-bowling legend Sir Curtly Ambrose is seeking to fire up underdogs West Indies who face top-ranked Australia in the first of three Test matches from this evening (Caribbean time).Ambrose, the bowling consultant, is insisting that the West Indies have the manpower to challenge the home side in the three-match rubber following their humiliating 10-wicket loss to an inexperienced Cricket Australia X1.Australia defeated West Indies 2-0 in their last series played in the Caribbean earlier this year.”Even though we lost 2-0, there were moments or periods when we had them on the back foot and had their backs against the wall. And we never really finished them off,” recalled Ambrose.”So we believe we can compete, and not only compete, but we believe we can beat them, and that’s our focus: to beat Australia. Not just to compete but to win and, being the underdogs, sometimes it’s good to be that way.”The Caribbean side was able to avoid an innings defeat against the young Cricket Australia’s X1 on the strength of a stubborn partnership between Jason Holder and Kemar Roach.But their defeat has forced former players and commentators to question their confidence going into the opening Test at Hobart.However, the former fast bowler is insisting that given the expectation of the Australian public, the home side is the one under pressure to perform.”We have nothing to lose. As far as we are concerned, Australia is the one under pressure. They have to beat us because Australians expect them to steamroll us. So they are the ones under pressure, not us,” he said.”We’re here to do a job and we’re going to make a good job of it. We’re not going to worry about what has been said about us not being a good team or not going to compete and games being over in three days and all that kind of stuff.”Jason Holder’s men arrived in Australia not having won an overseas tour of note in 20 years and are ranked above only Zimbabwe and Bangladesh.Ambrose has described in-form batsmen Steve Smith and David Warner as the main threat in the Australian batting line-up, but contends that their middle order is vulnerable.”They are in some good form at the moment, and there are two good batsmen and, yes, they will be key. If we can get them out early for not too many runs, I still believe that the middle order of Australia is not that solid at the moment,” Ambrose pointed out.”I think Warner and Smith will be key, and once we get them out early, that could give us some leeway to really test them.”Ambrose has identified the bowling attack as the Windies’ strength and expressed confidence in Jerome Taylor’s ability to lead an attack capable of taking 20 Australian wickets.”Since I joined the team, it took me a little while to get them to buy into my concept because they are accustomed to certain things and, of course, it would not change overnight,” said Ambrose, who took up his consultancy role in February 2014.The first Test will be played at the Blundstone Arena, from Thursday to Monday. First ball is 10:30 a.m. (Wednesday 6:30 p.m. Jamaica time).last_img read more

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Sports Briefs

first_imgFIFA ethics judges open case against Valcke ZURICH (AP): FIFA ethics judges have formally opened a case against Jerome Valcke, who faces a nine-year ban from football. The ethics committee’s judging chamber says it “decided to institute formal adjudicatory proceedings” against FIFA’s former secretary general after studying a prosecution file sent by ethics investigators. The judges acted one day after extending Valcke’s 90-day interim ban by 45 days. Valcke is charged with several violations of the FIFA code of ethics while serving as President Sepp Blatter’s top aide since 2007. The charges include accepting gifts and conflicts of interest. The judges gave no details of the case, citing Valcke’s “privacy rights and the presumption of innocence until proven guilty”. Man United recall winger DORTMUND, Germany (AP): Belgium winger Adnan Januzaj was returning to Manchester United yesterday after his one-year loan spell at Borussia Dortmund was cut short after half a season. The Bundesliga side confirmed that the clubs agreed on “an immediate return”, and that the “last contractual details between the parties are being sorted out”. The 20-year-old Januzaj joined Dortmund at the end of the last transfer period but failed to make his mark with the side. He played just 166 minutes as a substitute in six Bundesliga games, managing four shots at goal, and scoring none. He played two full games in five Europa League appearances for Dortmund, but again didn’t score. Football’s rule-makers discuss approving video replay trials LONDON (AP): Soccer’s rule-makers are discussing whether to approve trials of video replays to assist referees who find it harder to keep up with the faster, modern game. The International Football Association Board first approved technology in 2012 that was limited to systems determining whether the ball crossed the goal-line. But the FIFA-dominated panel met yesterday in London to decide whether to allow the first official in-game tests with video replay systems that could, for example, help to inform referees on whether a penalty should be awarded, a player should be sent off, or consider violent conduct they might have missed. It is “physically harder for referees to keep up,” and high-tech assistance is proving essential, English Football Association chief executive Martin Glenn said. Kiwis beat Lankans by three runs in T20 MOUNT MAUNGANUI, New Zealand (AP): Martin Guptill and Kane Williamson each made half centuries in a 101-run opening partnership to help New Zealand beat Sri Lanka by three runs in the first Twenty20 international between the teams yesterday. Guptill scored 58 from 34 balls to give New Zealand the high-tempo start they needed after Sri Lanka won the toss and elected to bowl first. Williamson supported him with 53 from 42 balls to lead New Zealand to 182-4. In reply, Danushka Gunathilaka made 46 and Milinda Siriwardana 42 to help Sri Lanka keep things close into the final over.last_img read more

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Fort St. John Huskies big weekend

first_imgAfter Friday’s game, the Huskies will travel to Dawson Creek, where they will take on the Junior Canucks at the Dawson Creek Memorial Arena on Saturday. The last time these two teams clashed, they met in Fort St. John’s North Peace Arena, with our hometown Huskies beating Dawson Creek by a score of 5-3.Advertisement The Huskies will travel to Grande Prairie to take on the Wheelers Friday night at the Coca-Cola Center. Upon their last meeting on Nov. 27, the Huskies traveled to Grande Prairie and came home with a 5-2 victory under their belts.- Advertisement -The Huskies are hoping for the same result at Friday’s game, which is a big one for the dogs as they are only one point away from fourth place, with a total of 18 points. The team currently holds a record with nine wins and eight losses, as they sit alone in fifth place in the league.When asked about injuries on the team, Huskies head coach Bob Kalb says that they were in fact suffering from some injuries, but that regardless of the roster they had to be ready for the big weekend ahead of them.[asset|aid=3334|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=e4b7384b160f43f57ec468dc3df3a680-Coach Kalb 1_1_Pub.mp3] This is a crucial game for the league standings, as only one point separates the two teams and a win over the Junior Canucks would move the Huskies into sole possession of fourth place in the NWJHL. The team had a chance to progress through the rankings last weekend, but a couple of home losses prevented them from doing so. Although, despite both unsuccessful games last weekend, Coach Kalb is confident that his team can rally and build from the experience.[asset|aid=3335|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=e4b7384b160f43f57ec468dc3df3a680-Coach Kalb 2_1_Pub.mp3] Our Fort St. John Huskies have a busy weekend approaching. The puck drops Friday at 8:30 p.m. and Saturday evening at 8 p.m.last_img read more

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The Professor Of Chikmagalore

first_imgChikmagalur, a rainy and hilly district in southern Karnataka, draws a growing number of tourists from Bangalore, who come here for spectacular views of the Western Ghats, or to spend a night in Kemmanagundi, the local hill station. But for a few visitors-and I am one of them-a trip to,Chikmagalur, a rainy and hilly district in southern Karnataka, draws a growing number of tourists from Bangalore, who come here for spectacular views of the Western Ghats, or to spend a night in Kemmanagundi, the local hill station. But for a few visitors-and I am one of them-a trip to Chikmagalur is always accompanied by the hope that we might spot its most famous resident, Professor Carvalho. He should be easy to find: He’s a Mangalorean Catholic, somewhat unusual for these parts, sports a silvery beard, and his Kannada, though formal, is interspersed with English phrases like “My dear young man” and “Yesyes”. So we crane our necks out of cars and buses and stare at the locals, wondering if Carvalho is among them-though we know, of course, that he is not.Aravind AdigaHe lives only in a novel. Published in 1980, Poornachandra Tejaswi’s Kannada classic Karvalo is set around the town of Mudugere in Chikmagalur. A typical town in the Western Ghats: The locals grow honey, rear cattle, and live a hard life, which is made harder by police and politicians. They have a stranger in their midst. Professor Carvalho, a scientist posted at a nearby research centre, is a treasury of information on all kinds of agricultural problems, an expert on glow-worms, and a man who receives photographs and letters from around the world. Though the kindly Mangalorean is always ready to help the locals, some of them are suspicious. What is this urbane, prosperous scientist doing in the middle of nowhere? Is he a foreign agent?One day Carvalho confesses. He is on the trail of a very rare lizard, one that can fly. The creature is a living fossil, a relative of the dinosaurs that survived their extinction by growing wings. Though it was last observed a hundred years ago in Africa, Carvalho is sure it matches the descriptions of a creature seen recently in the forests of the Western Ghats. He has written to the Smithsonian Institute and the British Geographical Institute, and they have jointly offered a reward for this amazing lizard-payable in pounds sterling!advertisementNow all the locals want to be friends with Carvalho. A search party, armed with a cook, heads into the woods. Fatigue sets in quickly, and men who are used to coming to the wilderness only for firewood or shikar grow weary of its monotony. The scientist revives them. He makes them see the forest with new eyes: He touches the branch of a tree, and lo!-it sprouts a moustache and legs and turns into a worm. Under the dark cover of the trees, the locals hold discussions with Carvalho. Does God exist? Does He oversee Evolution? If all creatures are subject to Evolution, how has this living fossil alone opted out of the process? At last they find the lizard-or something that might be their lizard-and give it chase as it glides through the trees, slipping past their hands again and again to reach the very edge of the Western Ghats. Now Carvalho and the others think they have got it: The lizard is at a sheer cliff with nowhere to go. The mysterious reptile, however, has one last trick to play on its pursuers.Tejaswi-whose father, Kuvempu, was a celebrated Kannada poet-made his literary reputation in the early 1970s with the short story collection Abachoorina Post Office. Inspired by Ram Manohar Lohia’s call for a social revolution, these angry and poetic stories are as unsettling as anything by Manto. The multi-talented Tejaswi published essays on astronomy and natural history, took photographs of Chikmagalur (where he lived), and translated wildlife books from English into Kannada; by 1980, he had mellowed enough to write Karvalo. The language is simple and precise; the vision, genial and humanistic, rests equally on commitment to one’s fellow men and respect for the environment. If he lacks the nationwide reputation of U.R. Ananthamurthy or cult following of S.L. Bhyrappa-the Mysorean novelist who is a favourite of the Hindutva crowd, Tejaswi, who died in 2007-is adored in Karnataka as no other writer is. Both comic and cosmic, Karvalo expands out of Chikmagalur. Wherever I am in the hills, in Mussoorie or Germany, there are times when leaves rustle behind me and I turn, expecting to find an eccentric Mangalorean scientist in pursuit of a flying lizard that is as ancient as the dinosaurs. -Aravind Adiga is a Booker Prize-winning novelist.last_img read more

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A weighty Grain

first_imgWhile the musician was in Delhi for a performance at The Aquarium Lounge, we got a chance to talk to him. Read on…Before we get into your solo projects, I must bring up Midivil Punditz. Describe to us the journey Indian electronica music has taken ever since you began making music? Midival Punditz has been Tapan and my main project for the last 15 years and we have come a long way from being Dj’s in Delhi night clubs, to making our own music and releasing 3 studio albums till yet. We started making electronica when it was just starting out in the west. This actually gave us a pretty open palette to do anything we wished to in India. So, we kinda decided to do the most honest style that came to us. We did not realise at that time that it would be called Asian Electronica eventually. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’You are coming out with an album called Grey to Silver, where you have collaborated with Karsh Kale. Is there an underlying theme behind this album? What inspired you to create it? Describe that moment to us.The Grain project came about, out of my personal desire to write songs and vocal tracks. I have wanted to do song-writing for a long time now, and it was with Karsh that i started experimenting with it. I wrote the first couple of tracks with Karsh and then with Talia Bentson, and that was a realisation into the style i wanted for Grain. I think it was after I wrote It’s All Right with Karsh that the entire sound emerged for me. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixWhat is the stuff that you grew up listening to? Tell us a little bit about your key musical influences?Like any other kid born in the 70’s, I grew up listening to 80s music, and then Classic Rock. It was not until the 90’s that i started listening to the Electronica artists like Prodigy, Chemical Brothers, Fat Boy Slim, Apollo 400, etc. My musical influences have been a mix of all these, from Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, to Michael Jackson and Prodigy. Daft Punk’s Thomas Bangalter, in an interview said, ‘Today, electronic music is like an audio energy drink. Artists are overcompensating with this aggressive, energetic, hyper-stimulating music – it’s like someone shaking you. But it can’t move people on an emotional level.’ Do you agree?I agree with Thomas’ introspection on the electronica production these days. It has become pretty aggressive and loud. However, there is also a lot of good emotional and well written electronica out there.What suggestion/advice would you have for newbies in this field?Make ‘honest’ music. Please speak the truth and that will make you successful and also make the audience feel your music.last_img read more

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