Bad Karma PayPal President Reports Stolen Credit Card

first_img Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 2 min read Register Now » February 12, 2014center_img In a karmic twist, just weeks after PayPal allegedly helped to compromise the credit-card data of one of its users, the company’s president, David Marcus, has now reported his very own theft.The PayPal chief tweeted on Monday, “My card (with EMV chip) got skimmed while in the UK.”Marcus also continued to deny PayPal’s involvement in the recent incident in which the company allegedly divulged the last four credit-card numbers of the California web developer Naoki Hiroshima, who was being extorted by hackers for his twitter handle, @N.Related: Swallow This ‘Password’ Pill to Unlock Your Digital Devices“That actually didn’t happen,” Marcus shot back to one commenter who raised the issue.But nobody, it seems, is immune from the recent wave of hackings that has inundated thousands of consumers, leading retailers and web companies nationwide including Target, Neiman Marcus, GoDaddy, Michael’s and Yahoo.Marcus added that his information had been stolen by hackers “at the hotel I was staying at. They then cloned it and went on a shopping spree.”Related: Extortion Over $50,000 Twitter Handle Sets a Chilling PrecedentOf note is that Marcus’s card featured EMV technology (a small chip that generates new codes for every transaction), which is pervasive throughout the rest of the world. Though many believe EMV could be the solution to America’s recent hacking woes, Marcus’ incident goes to show that no card is entirely infallible.Ever the marketer, Marcus used the incident as an opportunity to promote his company. “Obfuscating card data online, on mobile, and now more and more offline remains one of PayPal’s strongest value props,” he tweeted.Related: The Only Thing Scarier Than Self-Driving Cars Are the Hackers Waiting to Attack Them Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globallast_img read more

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Joke Cryptocurrency Dogecoin Now Has a 2 Billion Market Cap

first_img You can point to the incredibly volatile pricing of today’s top cryptocurrencies as proof that they are, at a minimum, an incredibly risky investment. And you can get an even better idea of the state of the market by looking at the strange success of one unlikely currency: Dogecoin. Yes, that’s the cryptocurrency that’s named after the incredibly popular Shiba Inu dog meme that took off in 2013. Originally created as a joke, Dogecoin now sits at a market capitalization of over $2 billion.Dogecoin was trading at just around $0.0021 a coin around the beginning of December. And it appears to have been wrapped up in all the “Bitcoin Mania” over the past month, which includes all the companies that put the word “blockchain” in their names and watched their stock prices soar. As of today, Dogecoin trades for around $0.018 a coin — a 757-percent increase.”I haven’t held a substantial amount of Dogecoin since early-2015 so the market cap doesn’t mean a lot to me,” writes Jackson Palmer, Dogecoin’s creator. “It does however act as my barometer for crypto mania and speculation. I have a lot of faith in the Dogecoin Core development team to keep the software stable and secure, but I think it says a lot about the state of the cryptocurrency space in general that a currency with a dog on it which hasn’t released a software update in over 2 years has a $1B+ market cap.”Palmer says he’s concerned that all the talk surrounding the valuation of different cryptocurrencies — focused on their potential as investments — is taking too much attention from the technology that powers them.”As a result, we’re seeing even highly centralized assets such as Ripple achieve extremely high valuations, despite their lack of technological innovation and misalignment with the original vision of Bitcoin,” he writes.Are we in a bubble, though? According to Palmer, the answer seems pretty obvious: yes. Unfortunately, it’s a lot trickier to time when this bubble might burst, if it does. And should that happen, Palmer says that he hopes negative reactions to the considerable amount of money that might be lost don’t ruin the mainstream appeal of digital currency, nor stifle research and innovation in the space.To that point, even Dogecoin’s developers are willing to offer a little financial device via their Twitter account: Don’t borrow money to trade Dogecoin (or any cryptocurrency). 3 min read Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global This story originally appeared on PCMag Register Now » January 8, 2018 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more

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