Database advice

UK Fundraising welcomes a new columnist this month. Peter Wylie will be writing a monthly column on fundraising databases. Peter holds a doctorate in industrial psychology from Columbia University, and is an expert on how non-profit organisations can do a far more efficient job of fund raising by carefully mining their donor databases.Read his first column on the issue of US and UK fundraising databases below.Database marketing: UK and USDear Dr. Wylie: I’m glad you’re writing a column on database fundraising, but I’m a little concerned that your experience is unique to North America. As you know, there are some pronounced differences between our two countries despite the fact we speak the same language (more or less). Can you speak to my concern. Advertisement Tagged with: Digital Individual giving Technology Howard Lake | 24 December 1998 | News Dear Concerned: Were I in your shoes, I suspect I might feel very much as you do. There certainly are big differences between our two cultures and the ways people do business in them. At the same time, I’m convinced that the principles of database marketing are equally applicable to fundraising in both our countries primarily because of an exceptional book I happened upon a little over a year ago. It’s called Direct and Database Marketing and it’s written by Graeme McCorkell, a UK citizen who makes his home in Shropshire. You should read the book and judge for yourself, but I think you’ll find that Mr. McCorkell offers a number of concepts that those of us in the field of fundraising can and should be borrowing. For example, take these three concepts that McCorkell devotes a number of pages to: the lifetime value of a customer customer share statistical modeling Shouldn’t fund raisers be thinking about the lifetime value of their donors? Shouldn’t we be using our databases to track the long-term value of our donors and to recognize that value with the non-profit equivalent of frequent flyer miles and free upgrades to first class. Shouldn’t fund raisers be thinking about “donor share” the way database marketers in corporations have come to realize that MARKET share may not be nearly so important as CUSTOMER share–the portion of a customer’s disposable income they get versus what a competitor gets? Shouldn’t fund raisers be doing the same kind of statistical modeling that profit making direct marketers do to predict who buys and who doesn’t and who to mail to three and four times as opposed to just once? I think McCorkell’s ideas are right on the money for fundraising is the U.S. They have to be even more on target for fundraising in the U.K. But back to your concern: I have every intention of making suggestions I offer in future columns as relevant to BOTH our cultures as I can. But if, for any reason, I miss the mark a bit, please contact me either through the Web site or by e-mail so I can try to be more responsive to your questions. Peter Wylie holds a doctorate in industrial psychology from Columbia University. He is an expert on how non-profit organizations can do a far more efficient job of fund raising by carefully mining their donor databases. His business phone is (202)332-7571; his e-mail address is [email protected] AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  44 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Database advice About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

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Rowe’s secures national distribution with Tesco

first_imgCornish craft bakery Rowe’s has sealed a deal to supply Tesco stores nationwide with scones under the Tesco Finest brand.Rowe’s already supplies Tesco stores in the South West region with own-brand baked goods, but this is the first time the bakery has secured a national contract with the multiple.The new scones, available in sultana and cheese flavours, are specially designed to naturally break into two halves, with bakers at Rowe’s formulating the recipe so that a slight crack is present in the finished product. The sultana scones are available in 650 stores nationwide and retail at £1.39 per pack, while the cheese scones are available in 400 stores and retail at £1.49.“The Tesco Finest scones represent an entirely new venture for us in terms of having a national distribution,” said Paul Pearce, director of marketing at Rowe’s. “We use locally sourced ingredients wherever possible in all our products, coupled with traditional craft baking techniques. It’s fantastic for us to see a product that we’ve developed from scratch launched in Tesco stores nationwide.”Tesco marketing manager Jo Wren added: “It’s great for us to be able to bring local suppliers like this into national tenders.”WC Rowe was established in 1949 in Falmouth, Cornwall. The company has 17 outlets and also supplies Rowe’s branded and own-label products to national retailers and supermarkets throughout the UK.The company was named Bakery Supplier of the Year in last year’s Baking Industry Awards after working closely with Sainsbury’s to develop a premium scone range under the Taste the Difference brand.last_img read more

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