Dad of three sorry after being caught speeding at 163kph with kids in car

first_imgA father of three who was caught speeding at 163kph with his three children in the back has been warned his driving could have had tragic consequences.Paul Conaghan appeared at Letterkenny District Court charged with dangerous driving. Conaghan, of Rough Park, Letterkenny, had been stopped by Gardai who detected him driving at 163kph in a 100kph zone on the N13 at Dromore outside Letterkenny on February 25th last.Garda Michael Kilcoyne said he detected the car speeding around 5pm and then followed it after activating the flashing lights on his Garda car.He eventually caught up with the driver and found he had three children on board.He told Gardai that his speeding was irresponsible saying he was simply in a hurry.Solicitor for the accused, Frank Dorian, said his client had no previous convictions and did not even have a penalty point.Judge Paul Kelly said Conaghan’s speeding could have had disastrous consequences and the accused said he had now learned a lesson.Judge Kelly reduced the charge form dangerous driving to careless driving and fined Conaghan, aged 37, €250.Dad of three sorry after being caught speeding at 163kph with kids in car was last modified: April 15th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:courtKidsletterkennyPaul Conaghanspeedinglast_img read more

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Awareness event to shine a light on lung cancer

first_imgDonegal will be shining a light on lung cancer at a moving event this weekend.Anne-Marie Baird, a Donegal scientist and patient advocate based in Dublin, is holding Donegal Shines a Light on Lung Cancer in Glenveagh National Park this Saturday November 2nd.The visitor’s centre will open at 5.30pm, with informal awareness talks at 6pm in the AV room. A walk will follow to the castle at approx. 6.20pm from the visitor’s centre, with ‘shine a light’ taking place at the front of the castle. Refreshments will be served afterwards in the Lagoon, Termon. Shine a Light on Lung Cancer is an initiative from the Go 2 Foundation for Lung Cancer and this will be the fourth time that the event will be held in Ireland.Over the past three years, this event has increased the profile of lung cancer in Donegal, while also raising nearly 9,000 euro for both lung cancer awareness and research. The continued aim of this event is to help increase awareness around lung cancer and to fight the stigma associated with this disease. Money raised on the night will go to the Lung Unit in Letterkenny University Hospital. More information can be found here www.facebook.com/donegalsal and you can register here: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/donegal-shines-a-light-on-lung-cancer-tickets-77611890253 Awareness event to shine a light on lung cancer was last modified: October 30th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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iPhone to Android: A Confession of Infidelity

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Related Posts sarah perez Tags:#Apple#Google#mobile#Op-Ed#web What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img I’m approaching the 3-month mark with my first Android phone – Google’s flagship device, the Nexus S. I can fully confirm that it has taken at least this long for me to really begin thinking of this device as my phone, as my primary device and the one that I turn to the most when I’m using a mobile. My iPhone, as those of you who have been following this series know, is only semi-functional these days, after a long, 30-minute dip in my backyard’s pond. The fact it works at all is a testament to Apple’s craftsmanship, I’d argue.Still, even three months into the Android experience, I feel the need to confess: I’ve been cheating on my Nexus S. And I’ve been cheating with the iPhone. Why? Because it’s there? Or because the iPhone still has Android beat in several key areas?If you haven’t been following my transition from iPhone to the Nexus S, you can start here with my one-week review, then check in again here when I hit one month, here when I reached a month and a half and here at the 2-month point. This is an ongoing series.A Confession: I’ve Been Cheating Here’s my excuse: the Nexus S’s battery life is the pits – that is, in comparison with the iPhone. Oh sure, it’s better than many other Android phones out there, I’m told. But coming from the iPhone world, it’s still not what I’m used to. I struggled with this in the beginning of my transition, and I still struggle with this today, despite making some gains in the area of battery management through the use of applications, best practices and a lot of plugging in.My phone is almost always plugged in when not being used, and when it’s not, I know what to expect – a drained battery by afternoon or evening, depending on use. It’s a fact of life I’ve learned to live with, a trade-off for all the other goodness (and of that, there is much) that Android brings.But this issue has also served as an excuse to cheat. My iPhone is still functional, still activated and still very much a part of my day-to-day life. Now, like a corporate drone whose I.T. department rejects personal phones on the company network, I carry not one phone, but two.Still, using the battery drainage as an excuse to return to the iPhone feels like the cheap excuse that it is. I could just as easily purchase a battery booster pack or extra battery and give up the iPhone for good, right? I could just as easily pop my SIM card into another phone in my collection. But instead, I keep picking up the iPhone.Why?Am I really an iPhone girl at heart? Have I signed up for the wrong camp?Why Am I Cheating? And Why Won’t I Switch Back (Yet) After much consideration, I’ve decided the answer is “no.” I may cheat, but I still prefer Android. On the grand list of pros and cons, Android wins for three primary reasons: better notifications, customizable homescreens with widgets and a more open system for installing apps and making changes to the phone.iPhone’s user interface has been stale for years. It bores me. App folders, while functional, are ugly. They hide the pretty icons that made the iPhone’s screen after screen of apps at least somewhat attractive. But because of the ever-growing app catalog on iTunes, organizing apps into folders has become a necessarily evil for real app addicts.The iPhone notifications are frustrating too. Pop-ups that demand attention, each with equal importance, whether one is a simple re-tweet from Twitter or an urgent SMS message. Ignore them by hitting “close” when you’re in the middle of something, and soon, you’ll have completely forgotten what the messages had said. Worse, in an effort to compete for your attention, some apps overuse the notifications feature in an almost spam-like way. As much as I enjoy Hashable, for example, I don’t need to know the exact moment when a contact of mine begins using the service. Yes, of course this is configurable, but it requires an extra trip into Settings. And what if I do want to know who starting using Hashable, just not in real-time, via interrupting pop-ups? There just aren’t great solutions for this on Apple’s current platform. Meanwhile, the notifications on Android are more subtle. Maybe too subtle. There’s no pop-up demanding your attention, but sometimes, that means you miss messages that you should have seen immediately. But on the plus side, the drop-down window shade keeps the notifications nicely organized until you can attend to them.Still, it’s iPhone’s demanding nature that causes me to return. In moments of quiet, when my iPhone buzzes with a pop-up alert I want to respond to, I grab the phone, slide to unlock and I’m in the application. I’m tweeting back, texting or otherwise engaged before I’ve even noticed that I’ve cheated on my Android.Android Still Lacks “Polish”There are also those minor complaints, so specific to my personal routine that they are hardly worth mentioning. But I will.For example, when using Google Reader’s mobile site – my number two most-used application outside of Gmail, something strange happens on Android – the news items start to expand, stretching out across the screen so that the little action items like “Edit tags” and “email,” found at the bottom of each article in Reader end up off the side of the screen, forcing you to scroll over to the right to find them. I don’t know how to reproduce this problem, but it happens every day. You fix it by scrolling back up to the top of the screen, so that you can again see the address bar. Then everything automatically resizes itself to fit properly within the screen.Also, my preferred keyboard, SwiftKey, has issues with Google Reader. Although I like using it everywhere else on the phone, here it drives me nuts. When I try to select the tag that Reader suggests from its drop-down box, SwiftKey autocorrects it. Sometimes this gets so frustrating that I simply put the phone down and switch to iPhone. I realize, of course, I could simply swap out keyboards temporarily, but then there’s still the other issue with the screen resizing itself in Reader.Like I said, these are complaints that affect my own personal routine, and won’t likely impact many others, but they’re enough of a hassle to lead to my cheating on the Nexus S. At the end of the day, I’m in Reader a lot (and I prefer the mobile site to the native app) and the experience is sub-par on Android. When people talk about the “polish” of the iPhone’s user interface, it’s often a sum of minor details like this. Things you would never notice until they don’t work. That’s the problem on Android – despite its power and features, it lack the attention to detail found on iPhone.There’s no tapping at the top of the screen to automatically scroll up, the copy-and-paste feature is still cumbersome, positioning the cursor properly is hit-or-miss and finger taps on links close together are often misinterpreted due a seeming lack of precision with the touchscreen’s hardware itself.You Decide: Polish or Power?But I’m willing to sacrifice the polish for the power, I’ve decided. Widgets and notifications are not gee-whiz baubles with no real value – they’re improved ways to interact with a mobile phone and the massive amounts of data we now have to consume every day. Maybe Apple will introduce them in the iPhone 5. Maybe they will be even better when Apple does so. But even if so, they’re incredibly late. The iPhone is perfect in many ways, but stale. It’s outdated. Yes, it’s easy. It’s intuitive. But to me, it’s boring.All that being said, Apple gets a lot of things right, and for that reason, there’s no real winner in my own personal battle pitting the Android against the iPhone. I will do my best to let the iPhone go. To switch it off and leave it behind. But for now, the best I can do is promise this: the iPhone is no longer my *primary* device. That will be my Android.Or whatever phone I try next.In fact, I have an HD7 running Windows Phone 7 in my bag, nearly ready to go through the same process. Maybe it’s time for another experiment. Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaceslast_img read more

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Ontario Tories quietly release list of campaign promises call it final plan

first_imgAfter vowing for weeks to deliver a fully costed platform, Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives on Wednesday quietly released a compilation of their campaign promises without saying how they would pay for them.The updated “Plan for the People,” posted on the party’s website, lays out how much each initiative is expected to cost but not where the money will come from, nor does it explain the billions in so-called “efficiencies” Tory Leader Doug Ford has promised to find.Ford did not speak about the online document, but his spokeswoman said it was the party’s final plan.“We do not know the state of Ontario’s finances and anyone who tells you they do is lying to you,” Melissa Lantsman said, alluding to the provincial auditor general’s finding that the governing Liberals’ deficit projections are understated by billions.Lantsman said the Tories would not balance the budget in the first or second year of their term but were committed to getting the books back in the black as quickly as possible.Ford faced increasing criticism for not releasing a full platform earlier in the campaign, with NDP Leader Andrea Horwath and Liberal Premier Kathleen Wynne deeming it disrespectful to voters.Both Horwath and Wynne heaped scorn on the notion that Ford had released a full plan Wednesday.“Look: This is not a fully costed plan, it’s not coherent,” Wynne said at a stop in Markham, Ont., where she pushed her government’s transit record. “All of the things that Doug Ford has said would add up to a $40-billion hole and they have no idea how they would find that.”Horwath was equally jaundiced, saying it wasn’t good enough for Ford to write a “list of things he might do and put it on the internet.”People should know what Ford’s plans are, what he’s going to cut and what services might be at risk, the NDP leader said.“His list of things-to-do that he put on his website is not going to help people to decide which way to vote and what’s their best interest in this campaign,” Horwath said. “What’s worrisome is we have a leader who’s trying to take the chair of the premier in this province and he’s not being honest with people.”The Tories began the campaign with a significant lead only to find themselves now battling the NDP for first place in the polls, which also show the Liberals falling further behind both.With the election roughly a week away, Wynne travelled to the heart of her NDP rival’s riding on Wednesday to portray herself as the only seasoned stateswoman in the campaign capable of rising above the ideological fray.At a stop in Hamilton outside a Stelco steel plant, she attacked both Horwath and Ford as unyielding ideologues without the experience to fend off the threat of American steel tariffs.“On the one end of the spectrum, you have Doug Ford — he’s expressed his admiration for (U.S. President) Donald Trump, despite the chaos, the uncertainty that the Trump administration has caused Ontario,” Wynne said. “On the other extreme, you have the NDP, who have historically campaigned against free-trade agreements — I would suggest a rigid and impractical position.”The United States has exempted Canadian steel and aluminum from new tariffs on an interim basis. The exemption is due to expire Friday.While the federal government under Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has done much of the heavy lifting to protect the industry in Canada, Wynne played up her own efforts.“Over the past year, I have met with 37 governors, I have met with senators, I’ve met with congresspeople, I’ve met with senior members of the U.S. administration, all in an attempt to make it clear what our integrated relationship means to workers on both sides of the border,” said Wynne, who has been trailing behind her rivals in recent polls.“We were assertive, we were steadfast in our effort to make Ontario’s case to those decision makers. That threat of U.S. protectionism is not going to scare us off.”Wynne said Ontario has developed one of the strongest economies in North America under a Liberal government that worked with employees, business leaders, and political leaders on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border.Voters have a choice between her and her two inexperienced rivals, she said.“They’re going to be choosing a person to lead them who will be in some very tricky, very delicate negotiations with U.S. officials,” Wynne said. “That’s the reality of the role premier (and) we cannot let ideology get in our way.”Horwath, who portrayed herself as a champion of steel and steelworkers, rejected Wynne’s comments as “trying to stir up some trouble.” She said she had been vocal in her support of the industry.“Should I be given the opportunity to serve as premier I will be one of the biggest champions the steel industry has ever seen,” Horwath said. “It has literally, not only built our country and fuelled the economy of a nation, but it has absolutely and completely … built my city.”last_img read more

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