People give more when beneficiaries €˜make an effort’

first_img Howard Lake | 6 September 2007 | News Results showed that people are more willing to donate if disasters were caused by natural factors rather than manmade – famine following natural drought rather than famine following armed conflict, for example. Positive emotions such as empathy towards the victims also increase people’s willingness to donate. When people believed their donations had the potential to make a ‘real difference’ in the region affected, they were more inclined to donate. People also considered their country’s relations with that of the affected country when they made donations. They are less willing to donate if the victim country’s regime is perceived to be an enemy, rather than an ally. Dr Zagefka said this was interesting because often disaster victims might not actually support the regime, for example in a dictatorship. Nonetheless donors are biased against them because victims are associated with the enemy regime.The authors suggest that fundraising campaigns should seek to represent the victims as proactive rather than passive and they should convey the message that donations will be ‘effective’, establishing a feeling of trust in the potential donor. Campaigns should also highlight positive relations between the donor’s and the victim’s countries, or if this is not possible, then provide information that could help donors see the diversity of groups within that country.  35 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis People are more likely to give more to the victims of disasters when they think that beneficiaries are making an effort to help themselves and when the victims are not deemed to be responsible for the situation.A series of studies by Dr Hanna Zagefka and Dr Masi Noor of the Royal Holloway University of London for the British Psychological Society’s annual conference reveals why people donate more generously towards some humanitarian disasters than others. There were four studies, looking at willingness to donate to victims of the 2004 tsunami, and to the Darfur crisis as well as hypothetical disasters. Advertisement Tagged with: Research / statisticscenter_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis People give more when beneficiaries €˜make an effort’last_img read more

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UK government to give £75m a year for four years to global learning

first_img The UK government has pledged to give £75 million a year for the next four years to the Global Partnership for Education, a 50% increase on its previous annual level of support.DFID Minister Lynne Featherstone announced the contribution at a Brussels conference, adding that the funding was dependent on other wealthy countries contributing. At the same time, developing country governments have already announced their increased support for the fund.She was speaking at the Partnership’s Second Replenishment Conference at which more than 600 education leaders from more than 70 countries were meeting to make pledges for financing education in the world’s poorest countries.The funding pledges were welcomed by UK NGO campaign ‘Write to Learn’, a partnership of Global Citizen, Plan UK and RESULTS UK.Stephen Brown, spokesperson for the Write to Learn campaign said:“Today’s announcement is a huge boost and could see 29 million more children in education by 2018. We welcome too the financial contribution of developing country governments who have really stepped up and are now co-funding our ambition of universal access to quality education.”Tanya Barron, CEO of Plan UK, added: Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Funding statutory AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis “The strong pledge today by the UK Government of up to £75 million per year underlines the importance of getting a quality education for all.  In addition, today’s collective commitment to ensuring quality girls education and disability inclusive education means we are on the right path to ensuring no one is left behind.” UK government to give £75m a year for four years to global learning [message_box title=”About Global Partnership for Education” color=”blue”]The Global Partnership for Education is the only multilateral partnership devoted to getting all these children into school for a quality education. Established in 2002, the Global Partnership for Education is comprised of close to 60 developing countries, donor governments, international organizations, the private sector, teachers, and civil society/NGO groups.[/message_box]Image: books around the world by Guru 3D on Shutterstock.com  77 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 27 June 2014 | Newslast_img read more

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Belgium

first_img December 2, 2020 Find out more Almost a third of the population uses the Internet, up from only half a million people in 1998. Ninety per cent are men between 24 and 45, two-thirds of them with a university degree or the equivalent.This rapid growth is partly because Brussels, the capital of Europe and site of the European Union’s major institutions, was a pioneer of introducing new technology. The growth of the Internet is also fed by the many commercial incentives offered by fiercely competing local ISPs.Belgium is keen on free expression and human rights, but it was one of the first European countries to pass a law on retention of Internet connection data. In 2001, even before the 11 September attacks, such retention had been extended to a year. The concern to have and use this information is probably because the country has been traumatised in recent years by several paedophilia scandals and the exploitation of children through the Internet. June 19, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Belgium News RSF_en Help by sharing this information Ten RSF recommendations for the European Union Follow the news on Belgium News November 23, 2020 Find out more News LINKS:center_img to go further BelgiumEurope – Central Asia Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU June 2, 2021 Find out more News Receive email alerts BelgiumEurope – Central Asia -Electronique Libre association- Internet Rights Observatory RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive Organisation last_img read more

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