Bryophyte diversity and ecology of two geologically contrasting Antarctic islands

first_imgA comparison is made of the bryophyte floras of two small maritime Antarctic islands lying at similar latitudes and with similar climates and glacial topographies, but differing markedly in their origins, geologies and derived soils. Signy Island (South Orkney Islands) is geologically complex with substrata ranging from strongly acidic schist to strongly alkaline marble and amphibolite, while Deception Island (South Shetland Islands) is volcanic with mildly alkaline lava, tuff, basalt and fine ash. Both islands are relatively low and approximately half ice-free. Signy has a long history of glacial fluctuations, allowing a wide range of cryptogamic community types to develop since the mid-Holocene (at least 5500 years ago), while most present substrata on Deception are very recent, following extensive habitat change resulting from eruptions in 1839–1842 and 1967–1970. The unstable nature of Deception’s terrain greatly restricts habitat and plant community diversity. Nevertheless, both islands have the same number of bryophyte species and similar numbers that are exclusive to each island. Of the total of 81 moss and 19 liverwort species for both islands, only 36 and six species, respectively, are common to both islands. Much of this difference in species diversity is due to the greater substratum stability, abundance of surface water and the calcareous rocks and soils on Signy, and to geothermal activity at many sites on Deception.last_img read more

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Roger Waters & The Who Offer Career-Spanning Setlists To Close Out Desert Trip [Watch]

first_imgAfter six great performances from rock and roll icons over three packed nights, fans certainly left Desert Trip smiling. Check out a few more videos from The Who & Roger Waters’ final night, as well as their full setlists below.The Who: Roger Waters: Classic rock fans were treated to two amazing performances last night, as Desert Trip came to a close with sets from The Who and Roger Waters. Each artist dove into their repertoires, bringing out hit songs from all eras of their tenure. Any rock music appreciator was certain to be singing along the whole time, basking in the powerful music that both The Who and Pink Floyd have shared over the years.The night started with The Who, fronted by founding members Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend. With a stellar backing band that includes bassist Pino Palladino, drummer Zak Starkey (son of Ringo Starr), keyboardist John Bundrick and rhythm guitarist Simon Townshend (the younger brother of Pete), The Who seemed to lock in early with their earliest hit, “I Can’t Explain.” The show took fans on a saga through the band’s career, including segments of songs from the band’s two rock operas, Quadrophenia and Tommy. They ended with two of their most energetic and well-known songs, “Baba O’Riley” and “Won’t Get Fooled Again.”Watch those two final songs below, courtesy of Fake Fan. Next up was Roger Waters, who had been warming up for Desert Trip with setlists spanning the career of Pink Floyd. His performance at Desert Trip followed suit, opening with the famed “Speak To Me/Breathe” introduction of Dark Side Of The Moon. Waters would ultimately play the entirety of Dark Side during his performance, excluding the instrumentals “On The Run” and “Any Colour You Like”, mixed in with other classic numbers through the band’s career. He played the majority of Wish You Were Here and Animals, as well as tracks from Meddle, A Saucerful Of Secrets and, of course, The Wall.Watch some Dark Side highlights, courtesy of Fake Fan on YouTube. Setlists: Edit this setlist | More The Who setlists Edit this setlist | More Roger Waters setlistslast_img read more

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