City’s fire rating is downgraded

first_imgCouncilwoman Tela Millsap said she believes the rating went up because the report for the last rating in 2001 had shown that the city had five fire stations. In a 2001 memo to the council, then-fire Chief Robert Nelson stated that additional fire stations had been opened. But those buildings really weren’t stations, said Millsap, who had just come onto the council at the time. “I’ve been by them,” Millsap said. “They’re shacks. “It’s better to have an honest five than a questionable three.” The Fire Department no longer uses those buildings. The city has a split rating with areas located beyond 1,000 feet of a fire hydrant receiving a class nine rating. Insurance companies can use these ratings to determine risk in whether to sell insurance or how much to charge. Still, even with the change, insurance rates won’t necessarily increase, said Mike Delgado, a State Farm insurance agent. “It’s significant, but from a practical standpoint, we want to go and look at the property,” Delgado said. “They’re waving an entire number over the city of La Habra Heights.” Delgado said insurance companies look at three elements when deciding whether to insure or how much to charge. First is type of roof. Second is access for emergency equipment, and the third is the amount of clearance on the property. The rates don’t become final for a year, and officials for the city and the La Habra Heights Water District say they believe there may be some factual errors in the ISO report. Mike Gualtieri, water district general manager, said he was surprised by reduction in the rating for the water component. “All we’ve done is make improvements since 2001,” Gualtieri said. ISO evaluates all areas of the Fire Department, including receiving and handling alarms, manpower, equipment and training. It also evaluates the water supply system, including water pressure and condition of hydrants. [email protected] (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3022160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! LA HABRA HEIGHTS – A national insurance rating firm has downgraded its rating of La Habra Heights’ fire services, including water supply, in part because the last rating in 2001 was based on inaccurate information. The Chicago-based Insurance Services Office, which sets a national standard for fire departments, has decreased the city’s rating from a class three to a class five. Those areas located beyond 1,000 feet of a fire hydrant continue to receive a class nine rating. Insurance companies can use these ratings to determine risk in whether to sell insurance or how much to charge. Class one represents exemplary fire protection and Class 10 indicates that the community’s fire suppression program does not meet ISO’s minimum criteria, according to Mike Waters, vice president of ISO’s Risk Decision Services Department. last_img

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