Childs, Haws and Baxter earn All-WCC honors

first_imgNameYr.Pos.SchoolJames BatemonSr.GLMUYoeli ChildsJr.FBYUBrandon ClarkeJr.FGonzagaFrankie FerrariSr.GSan FranciscoJordan FordJr.GSaint Mary’sRui HachimuraJr.FGonzagaZach Norvell Jr.So.GGonzagaJosh PerkinsSr.GGonzagaIsaiah PineiroSr.FSan DiegoColbey RossSo.GPepperdine 2018-19 All-WCC Men’s Basketball First Team Tags: All-West Coast Conference/BYU Cougars Basketball/Gavin Baxter/TJ Haws/WCC/Yoeli Childs In league play, Childs (South Jordan, Utah) led the WCC in scoring at 20.7 points per game and was second in rebounding at 9.5 per contest. He was also top 15 in field goal percentage, steals, blocks, offensive rebounds and minutes played. Defensive Player of the Year: Brandon Clarke, Gonzaga March 5, 2019 /Sports News – Local Childs, Haws and Baxter earn All-WCC honors FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSAN BRUNO, Calif. – The West Coast Conference announced its 2018-19 awards today and Yoeli Childs, TJ Haws and Gavin Baxter earned honors. The All-WCC teams and award winners are voted on by the league’s 10 head coaches and are based on league games only. Childs scored in double figures in all but one league game, eclipsed 20 points nine times and had nine double-doubles, second in the WCC. He was a first-team honoree last season and was named to the All-WCC Freshman Team in 2016-17. Coach of the Year: Mark Few, Gonzaga Robert Lovell Written by The freshman forward started seven-straight games before missing the regular season finale due to illness. He was second in the WCC in field goal percentage and fourth in blocks. Newcomer of the Year: Brandon Clarke, Gonzaga Haws (Alpine, Utah) averaged 18.8 points, 5.3 assists and 1.3 steals during the 16-game league schedule. He was fifth in the WCC in scoring, fourth in assists, second in free-throw percentage, third in assist/turnover ratio and 12th in steals and 3-point field goals made per game.center_img Kameron Edwards, Pepperdine; Roberto Gallinat, Pacific; Mattias Markusson, LMU; Marcus Shaver, Portland; Jalil Tripp, Pacific; Josip Vrankic, Santa Clara; Isaiah Wright, San Diego A first-team All-WCC section as a freshman and honorable mention recipient as a sophomore, Haws scored in double figures in 13 WCC games, had 20-plus points seven times and dished out seven-plus assists eight times. NamePos.SchoolGavin BaxterFBYUDameane DouglasG/FLMUKessler EdwardsFPepperdineFilip PetrusevFGonzagaTrey WertzGSanta Clara Baxter (Provo, Utah) was BYU’s third leading scorer in league play at 7.3 points per game while adding 4.3 rebounds and a team-best 1.6 blocks per game. He also shot 68.1 percent from the field, first on the team. NameYr.Pos.SchoolTahj EaddySo.GSanta ClaraMalik FittsSo.FSaint Mary’sTJ HawsJr.GBYUCharles MinlendSo.GSan FranciscoOlin Carter IIISr.GSan Diego 2018-19 All-WCC Men’s Basketball Freshman Team Player of the Year: Rui Hachimura, Gonzaga Childs was named to the All-WCC First Team for the second-straight season while Haws earned a spot on the All-WCC Second Team – his third-straight season earning All-WCC recognition. Baxter was named to the All-WCC Freshman Team. 2018-19 WCC Men’s Basketball Honorable Mention Selections 2018-19 All-WCC Men’s Basketball Second Team 2018-19 All-WCC Men’s Basketball Major Individual Honors See the complete All-WCC announcement on WCCsports.com.last_img read more

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No. 23 BYU edges Santa Clara 85-75

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPROVO, Utah (AP) — T.J. Haws scored 28 points and had nine assists to help No. 23 BYU hold off Santa Clara 85-75.Yoeli Childs scored 22 points and grabbed 11 rebounds and Jake Toolson added 20 points and 10 boards. The Cougars won their seventh straight.Josip Vrankic scored 28 points and collected 11 rebounds to lead the Broncos. Tahij Eaddy added 11 points, all in the second half. February 20, 2020 /Sports News – Local No. 23 BYU edges Santa Clara 85-75 Written by Tags: BYU Cougars Basketball/WCC Associated Presslast_img

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US Forces Stop 570 Pounds of Cocaine off Panama

first_img View post tag: Panama US Forces Stop 570 Pounds of Cocaine off Panama Authorities View post tag: Cocaine View post tag: pounds View post tag: americas Back to overview,Home naval-today US Forces Stop 570 Pounds of Cocaine off Panama View post tag: Navy Share this articlecenter_img View post tag: 570 View post tag: News by topic U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Office of Air and Marine agents and international partners intercepted a suspicious vessel loaded with 570 pounds of cocaine in international waters off the coast of Panama. The estimated street value of the drugs is more than $42 million.A CBP OAM crew aboard a P-3 Orion fixed-wing aircraft detected a fast-moving panga-type vessel in open waters near Panama City on August 14. The agents provided overhead surveillance as Panamanian law enforcement moved in to intercept the vessel. Authorities arrested three individuals and seized multiple bales of cocaine on the drug-trafficking vessel.In Fiscal Year 2014, CBP’s P-3s operating from Jacksonville, Florida and Corpus Christi, Texas, flew nearly 6,000 hours in support of counternarcotic missions resulting in 135 interdiction events of suspected smuggling vessels and aircraft. These events led to the total seizure or disruption of more than 126,000 pounds of cocaine with an estimated street value of $9.47 billion.[mappress mapid=”16778″]Image: CBP View post tag: Stops View post tag: US View post tag: Naval August 28, 2015last_img read more

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Mountain Jam Says They’re Shifting Their Focus “Back To The Jam” In 2019

first_imgAccording to a not-so-subtle hint posted to social media by Mountain Jam yesterday, fans of the jams are going to be pleased with the lineup for the 15th annual edition of the event in 2019. “We like our PB&J with lots of Jam. How ’bout you?” the post asks, along with the hashtag “#backtothejam”.Mountain Jam was founded by Warren Haynes, Gary Chetkof, and members of WDST/Radio Woodstock in 2005 to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the local rock radio station. Named after the beloved Allman Brothers Band song, it began as a one-day event centered around jam-oriented music and continued that way for many years, hosting acts like Gov’t Mule, Medeski, Martin & Wood, Benevento/Russo Duo, Mike Gordon, Phil Lesh & Friends, Umphrey’s McGee, RatDog, Galactic, Dumpstaphunk, the Allman Brothers Band, The Derek Trucks Band, Les Claypool, My Morning Jacket, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Widespread Panic, and more. Co-founder Warren Haynes played the festival every year from its inception through 2016.In recent years, the look—and, more importantly, sound—of the festival’s lineup has changed considerably, shifting toward more mainstream, radio-friendly rock acts. In 2017, the first year without Warren on hand, the Mountain Jam lineup was led by Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers, Peter Frampton, and Steve Miller Band, to name a few. The 2018 lineup, led by Jack Johnson, Sturgill Simpson, and Alt-J, marked the festival’s biggest departure yet from its jam roots.Many of Mountain Jam’s most loyal fans have been disheartened by its shift toward the mainstream in recent years, lamenting the fact that the beloved event had departed from its jam-centric roots as it tried to remain viable in the ever-changing festival climate. However, from this new hint, we can assume that the festival has heard the cries of its loyal fans. Mountain Jam is going #backtothejam in 2019, and we couldn’t be more excited.Who do you want to see play the 15th annual Mountain Jam in 2019? For more information on Mountain Jam, head to the festival website.last_img read more

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As new year kicks off, Obamacare brings profound changes to U.S. health care

first_imgAs Obamacare ramped up on January 1, 2014, the United States underwent a profound change in its health care system, according to health policy expert John McDonough, professor of the practice of public health at Harvard School of Public Health.McDonough spoke Jan. 6, 2014 on Dr. Timothy Johnson’s “Truth About Obamacare” podcast on WBUR’s CommonHealth. Johnson, MPH ’76, is retired medical editor for ABC News.“I’m hard-pressed to think of another day of such important consequence” in U.S. health care, said McDonough, a regular panelist on the four-month-old podcast series. He listed four major changes that took effect at the beginning of the year: The health insurance industry is now no longer able to deny people insurance because of pre-existing medical conditions; 2.1 million people chose a private plan for health insurance coverage after a December enrollment surge; 3.9 million people are newly enrolled in Medicaid; and Americans are now required to have health insurance—under Obamacare’s “individual mandate”—or pay a tax penalty. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Janet Yellen, honored by Radcliffe, ponders economy

first_imgWhen it became clear in 2013 that she was a leading candidate to chair the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Janet Yellen turned to her predecessor for advice.“It’s a tough job, I said, and it can be pretty thankless,” Ben Bernanke ’75 recalled telling Yellen, who was his second in command. But the comment didn’t dissuade her. With the U.S. Senate’s approval, she became the first woman to head the nation’s central banking system the following year.Addressing the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study’s annual post-Commencement gathering, known as Radcliffe Day, Bernanke said today that Yellen had several motivations for accepting President Barack Obama’s nomination to the post. Top among them was her “lifelong commitment to using what she had learned as an economist to improve the lives of average people.”“I think Janet well understood that by taking this position and applying her considerable talents, she could provide a valuable role model for future generations of young women who might otherwise not engage with economics or economic policymaking. That is in itself,” said Bernanke, “a great contribution on top of all the others that she has made.”Gregory Mankiw (left) asks questions of Yellen during their conversation. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerThose contributions were honored at the gathering. Yellen received the Radcliffe Medal during a luncheon in Radcliffe Yard for 1,300 attendees that included Radcliffe alumnae and fellows, recent College graduates, Harvard President Drew Faust, and U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch.“She unites scholarship and leadership for the public good. She brings candor and collegiality to solving complex problems. She strives to build an economy in which all Americans can thrive,” said Radcliffe Dean Lizabeth Cohen, who bestowed the medal with “the deepest admiration for a lifetime of visionary and principled service.”The afternoon’s festivities included a wide-ranging conversation between Yellen and Harvard’s Gregory Mankiw, Robert M. Beren Professor of Economics and former chair of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. Offering her the chance to move markets, Mankiw asked Yellen the question on many people’s minds: Where are interest rates headed? The Fed chair treaded carefully with her answer.Yellen said she expects the economy and the labor market to continue to improve and that, as it does, interest rates will “probably” rise. “It’s appropriate — and I’ve said this in the past — I think, for the Fed to gradually and cautiously increase our overnight interest rate over time. And probably in the coming months, such a move would be appropriate.”Still, she urged caution.“If we were to raise interest rates too steeply and we were to trigger a downturn or contribute to a downturn, we have limited scope for responding, and it is an important reason for caution.”Yellen grew up in Brooklyn, the daughter of a teacher and a family doctor. She excelled in school, becoming the editor-in-chief of her high school newspaper and her senior class valedictorian. She went on to Brown University, where during a class, she told Mankiw, she got hooked on economics. “I saw that monetary and fiscal policy were tools that could be used to address unemployment and improve people’s lives, and that attracted me, and it’s continued to be my motivation.”That message was reinforced by her graduate school mentor at Yale University, the Keynesian economist James Tobin, “who had the passion for social justice,” said Yellen, “and a moral compass that pointed straight north.”After earning her degree in economics from Brown in 1967, she received her Ph.D. in 1971 from Yale. She became an assistant professor at Harvard from 1971 to 1976 and later a lecturer at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She served on the Federal Reserve System‘s Board of Governors from 1994 to 1997 and as chair of President Bill Clinton‘s Council of Economic Advisers from 1997 to 1999. From 2004, until 2010, Yellen was president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.Yellen and Ben Bernanke shake hands following the event. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff PhotographerDuring her remarks, she praised Bernanke for his leadership during the 2008 financial crisis and his “inventive and innovative” approach to getting credit flowing back into the American economy, as well as for the Fed’s programs, asset purchases, and other efforts to get the economy back on its feet.Yellen said she, along with other regulators, economists, and the private-sector analyst, had seen warning signs on the economy a few years ago, but they missed the bigger picture and the systemic failings that led to the financial meltdown in 2008. “We really didn’t see that coming. And in that sense, I would say we are really trying to do a better job of that.”Today, the Fed is much more focused on systemic risk and financial stability, she said, and on identifying conditions that could trigger another crisis, as well as on large firms and financial institutions that have been forced to produce “living wills that would show how they could be safely dismantled using tools at our disposal.”Asked by Mankiw for advice to students in the audience, Yellen encouraged them to work in a field that they are passionate about and to do so in a place and with people who believe in the mission.“I certainly felt that way at the various universities I’ve been at,” said Yellen, “and I’ve felt that way very much working in the federal government.”last_img read more

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Professor named AERA fellow

first_imgThe American Educational Research Association (AERA) recently named Notre Dame sociology professor Mark Berends a fellow in recognition of his scholarly contributions to education research. Berends was accepted as one of 22 members of the association’s class of 2014, which is currently composed of 557 AERA fellows. He will also act as the program director for this year’s AERA meeting, a conference with more than 2,400 presentations and dozens of features of leading researchers in education.“Part of this AERA fellows is recognizing people that have had a long history of research that is informative and helpful to the field, so I’m very humbled by it,” Berends said. “It’s a great honor. “AERA is an organization with some 25,000 people — there’s a whole array of people that do work like I do and people that do other work, so one never knows how they’re going to get recognized in that.”The AERA fellows are selected on the basis of sustained excellence over a long period of time, and Berends said his career began at the RAND corporation, an independent objective “think tank” that does research to inform policy. He said that’s where he began applying sociology to educational reform, and learning to work on large team-based research projects with significant policy implications. “When I was there at the time there was a policy movement called ‘comprehensive school reform’ — that they would redo schools, [with the idea] that our schools are terrible, we’re not competitive in the world, we need to break the mold,” Berends said. A large project was conducted over several years in the 1990s that examined new designs for schools, he said. “That work stood the test of time in some ways, and other people tried to replicate it,” Berends said. “It was very mixed because they were trying to develop these new designs for schools, but then they were basically selling their products to school districts which have certain constraints and regulations, and so instead of ‘break the mold’ ideas, it became more ‘fill the mold.’”While at RAND, Berends said he researched test score trends in different demographics and examined family changes and schooling situations of students. This eventually led to an appointment at Vanderbilt’s Peabody School of Education.“That [appointment] played into some of that work and also comprehensive school choice where we were fortunate enough to get a big research center funded by the U.S. Department of Education, to look at school choice, whether that’s charter schooling, home schooling, scholarships or vouchers, a whole array of these kinds of choices,” Berends said. “We looked not just at differences in test scores, but whether these schools were really different: was the organization different, was the instruction different, was the teaching force different?”Now at Notre Dame, Berends acts as the Director of the Center for Research on Educational Opportunity (CREO), part of the Institute for Educational Initiatives. His research continues to focus on school choice and educational policy, with a couple of projects currently underway.“One is that Indiana has implemented a choice scholarship program, a voucher, for low and modest income families to take money to attend a private school,” Berends said. “We have a data-sharing agreement with Indiana Department of Education, and we’re looking at the early effects of that on state test scores. Not only public schools, but a lot of the private schools [also] take state tests so it’s a nice comparison.”Although Berends is using shared data, he also supplements more traditional metrics with a comprehensive approach including interviewing and tracking student integration and social networks.“A lot of my work over time is not only looking at test scores, which sometimes tend to be a horse race, but more ‘what are the conditions under which schools can be effective, whatever the type’ — whether that’s a Catholic school, a charter school and so on,” Berends said. “We’re always trying to get more information, whether that’s through quantitative or qualitative measures.”Tags: AERA Fellowlast_img read more

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Annie Baker & More Tapped for Signature Theater’s 2015-16 Season

first_img View Comments Pulitzer-Prize winning playwrights Annie Baker and Quiara Alegría Hudes will premiere new works as part of Signature Theater’s 2015-16 25th anniversary season, the last with James Houghton as artistic director. A.R. Gurney‘s Love and Money and Naomi Wallace’s Night is a Room will also receive their world premieres at the off-Broadway venue.Directed by Sam Gold, Baker’s John will begin performances at The Irene Diamond Stage from July 22, featuring Georgia Engel and Lois Smith. It is described as such: The week after Thanksgiving. A Bed & Breakfast in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. A cheerful innkeeper. A young couple struggling to stay together. Thousands of inanimate objects, watching.Almost a year later, Hudes’ Daphne’s Dive will bow at The Romulus Linney Courtyard Theatre. Helmed by Thomas Kail, the production will kick off on April 26, 2016 . Daphne’s Dive is a cheap corner bar in North Philly where Daphne and her eclectic group of friends and family meet, talk, bond and drink. As Daphne’s adopted daughter, very different from her quiet and pragmatic mother, grows up, this unconventional family is forced to confront ugly secrets and take a hard look at their lives.Gurney’s Love and Money will play at The Alice Griffin Jewel Box Theatre. Directed by Mark Lamos, the production will begin performances on August 15 of this year. Determined to donate almost everything she owns before her life of grace and privilege ends, wealthy widow Cornelia Cunningham’s plan hits a snag when an ambitious and ingratiating young man arrives to claim his alleged inheritance.Wallace’s Night is a Room will begin performances on November 3 at the Alice Griffin. Helmed by Bill Rauch, the play follows Liana and Marcus, a well-off couple enjoying their perfectly pleasant lives. Doré has grown accustomed to an isolated existence in her working class neighborhood. After a surprise reunion on Marcus’ 40th birthday, their worlds are shattered by an unexpected turn of events.Arthur Miller’s Incident at Vichy will begin performances on October 27 at the Irene Diamond. Directed by Michael Wilson, the revival celebrates the centennial of Miller’s birth. In Vichy, France at the height of World War II, nine men and a boy are rounded up under suspicious circumstances. As ominous reports of far-off camps and cattle cars packed with prisoners begin to circulate, the men battle over politics, philosophy and how to escape.Tina Landau will direct Old Hats, also at the Irene Diamond, from January 26, 2016. Created and performed by Bill Irwin and David Shiner, with music and lyrics by and featuring Shaina Taub, the production uses music, technology and movement to create an outing that’s fun for the whole family.Next up will be Martha Clarke and Alfred Uhry’s Angel Reapers, which will begin performances on February 2, 2016 at the Romulus Linney. Directed and choreographed by Martha Clarke, the show will feature traditional Shaker songs and a mix of modern dance and actual Shaker movements.Finally, in honor of Signature’s 25th Anniversary a trio of short plays will be presented at the Alice Griffin from May 3, 2016, directed by Lila Neugebauer: Edward Albee’s The Sandbox, María Irene Fornés’ Drowning and Adrienne Kennedy’s Funnyhouse of a Negro.last_img read more

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Fox’s Grease: Live Will Feature a Studio Audience

first_img View Comments Musical theater and live audiences: they go to together (like rama lama lama, ka dinga da dinga dong).When Grease: Live airs on Fox next month, be on the lookout for not only an all-star cast (including Aaron Tveit, Julianne Hough and Carly Rae Jepsen), but also an audience filling the halls and bleachers of Rydell High. Director Thomas Kail and production designer David Korins (the team behind Hamilton) recently revealed that unlike its NBC-produced predecessors, Grease will invite audience members (by the hundreds) to be a direct part of the live broadcast experience.“There’s something we thought really suited Grease—the rhythm and the music of the show—to have that feedback with an audience,” explained Kail. “If we’re going to say Grease: Live, and we’re owning the “live”ness of it…we want to wrap our arms around that. That’s part of the thrill.”The telecast will utilize multiple sets across three sound stages: an outdoor location, an assortment of traditional three-wall sets and the gym: a four-wall, 360-degree unit that will offer an environmental and immersive space for the performers and the audience. Spectators will be scattered through the sets, so everyone present will experience certain moments in-person and others through monitors. Kail is partnered with television director Alex Rudzinski (Dancing With the Stars), who will oversee the technical elements of the broadcast, including the movement from set to set.When you see audiences on the bleachers, don’t expect them to be in ‘50s drag. “People should look and dress as they do now, because that’s when the show is happening,” said Kail. “The tension between [1959 and 2015] actually gives it a charge. We don’t think it’s going to break the bubble we’re making.”The addition of a studio audience is a step toward ensuring live musical telecasts remain a theatrical experience in the truest sense, and veteran designer Korins is committed to blurring the line between the two mediums: “All of those tropes that we see all the time—turntables and things like that—are commonplace in theater, but you very rarely see on camera.” Korins continued, “We’re looking to infuse our world with many theatrical devices…to let people experience theater on a mass scale.”Audience members will be cultivated through outreach initiatives and contests in the coming week. Whether from the studio or from the small screen, you can catch Grease: Live on Fox on January 31.last_img read more

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Walmart Pay: Not an atomic bomb, but a trojan horse (or a forceful nudge)

first_imgThe brands Walmart and Apple are rarely mentioned in the same breath – although, that circumstance is probably a result of typecasting more than consumer behavior. It may also change, at least among payments geeks, now that Walmart has unveiled its own entrant in the mobile wallet wars. Thanks to its sheer scale and reach, any move made by Walmart deserves attention. Still, dubbing this “an atomic bomb dropped on Apple Pay” (as this Forbes article did) seems a pretty big overstatement.Walmart has wisely focused on an integrated consumer experience, converging in-store and online checkout processes, enabling coupon and gift card redemption and split tenders, and building the payment functionality into its existing widely distributed mobile app. Other details remain in short supply, such as the recent Chase Pay announcement. Walmart Pay won’t be widely available until mid-2016, but on first blush Walmart’s approach has far more in common with Starbucks’ app than with Apple Pay.Like Starbucks, Walmart’s entrant is intended for use solely at the company’s own retail outlets. Again this could prove quite savvy, as it confers far more control over the user experience. It may also be the “secret sauce” that explains why Starbucks is the only player to have achieved scale in mobile payments. But it’s a different business opportunity than the one Apple, Samsung et al. are pursuing.The Starbucks analogy only carries so far, however. Walmart likes to tout that it comprises nearly 10 percent of all U.S. retail sales, and that 140 million consumers visit its stores each week. These are very impressive numbers, to be sure, but they represent a vastly different shopping experience than Starbucks. Many of whose patrons who visit daily (if not more often) have a standard/repeatable order – and place a premium on the fast in-and-out aspect of their interaction.Another widely reported aspect of the Walmart announcement is the implication that it reflects a repudiation of the MCX/CurrentC strategy. Representatives of Walmart and the MCX retail consortium have already issued follow-up quotes in an effort to squelch this impression. You’d expect these types of statements regardless of true intent, but I have a hard time with the “Walmart undercutting MCX” storyline for several reasons:First, in its still ongoing exploration of what it wants to be, MCX has at various times publicly stated that its model could involve a consortium of members each issuing their own wallet apps leveraging a common backbone. It’s possible that’s precisely what Walmart Pay has done. Technical details haven’t been shared, but it’s clear that Walmart Pay functionality is triggered by QR codes, the same path CurrentC chose. (It’s also similar to Starbucks’ approach. Although, they’ll take pains to point out their app actually uses “enhanced bar codes.”)And if Walmart’s move does prove to be a knockout blow for MCX, I’d hardly call it a sucker punch. The consortium has already incurred more than its share of self-inflicted damage. Don’t forget it launched long before Apple Pay, yet has not managed to proceed beyond the pilot stage amid numerous management changes and strategy shifts.With its announced Chase Pay partnership, MCX already seemed to have painted itself into a corner in terms of a standalone market solution but could declare partial victory for the reach the alliance brought its members. If anything, Walmart’s could become more the final push off the cliff for MCX.Finally, bear in mind the initial impetus for Walmart’s championing of MCX, which came from the Treasury group after all, was a fervent desire to reduce acceptance cost. In fact, some believed the consortium was largely a “stalking horse” built to gain leverage with the card networks in interchange negotiations. MCX hasn’t delivered measurable results on that front, and one could argue it’s where Walmart lost patience and decided to forge this new path.Maybe its shopping experience doesn’t map perfectly to Starbucks’, but with a reported 22 million users of its mobile app, Walmart can build usage of its payment feature with an accept-all-tenders approach (CurrentC has spent most of its existence back-burnering card acceptance in hopes of jumping straight to the ACH endgame), then gradually offering incentives to steer consumers to low-cost-routing (see PayPal for a best practice on this front).None of this is going to shift the payments world overnight. But it sure is fun to watch the chess pieces move and to strategize on how credit unions can best capitalize on these changing dynamics and allegiances. 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Best Financial technology service expert John Best crushes the reiterated maxim “thinking outside the box” to tiny particles, leveraging his lofty, yet proven, financial technology “innovativeness” for credit unions nationwide. Recently … Web: big-fintech.com Detailslast_img read more

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