Bournemouth’s £250m retail scheme opens

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COVID-19: Nearly 78,000 police to guard transition to Indonesia’s ‘new normal’

first_imgThe National Police have deployed 77,897 officers across the nation to guard the transition to the government’s so-called new normal phase, during which all citizens are required to abide by the COVID-19 health protocols to prevent wider spread of the disease.Police officers have been deployed to areas across all four levels of the government’s zoning system based on local infection rates, from the zero-risk green zones to the high-risk red zones, said National Police spokesman Sr. Comr. Awi Setiyono.“We have deployed 7,550 personnel to green zones, 8,981 personnel to yellow zones, 35,830 personnel to orange zones and 25,536 personnel to red zones,” he said on Tuesday, as quoted by tempo.co.According to the COVID-19 national task force’s June 21 data, the country currently has 57 areas categorized as red zones. Among these, East Java – the new epicenter of the national outbreak since June 26 – has the highest number of local red zones, comprising 13 cities and regencies.Meanwhile, 157 cities and regencies are now categorized as orange zones with moderate risk of COVID-19 transmission, and 188 regions are yellow zones with low transmission risk.Read also: Major regions still classified as red zones despite claims of improvementThe remaining 112 areas are green zones that have been declared either free of the virus or have not recorded any new cases in the past four weeks, with a 100 percent recovery rate.The nationwide deployment follows National Police chief Gen. Idham Azis’ decision last week to revoke the edict banning mass gatherings issued on March 19. Although the ban has been lifted, the National Police said that it would continue in an assisting capacity to ensure public discipline and compliance with the COVID-19 protocols during the new normal phase.“We will continue to support multisectoral cooperation in controlling the pandemic and disseminating [the health protocols] to the public,” Awi said.President Joko Widodo earlier stressed the role of the National Police and the Indonesian Military in guarding crowded places in preparation for the new normal “to make sure [that] society continues to abide by the health protocols”.According to published government data, Indonesia has 55,092 confirmed cases to date, with 2,805 deaths and 23,800 recovered cases. (trn)Topics :last_img read more

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PFZW to review Israeli divestment after allegations of pro-Palestinian bias [updated]

first_imgPFZW, the €137bn pension fund for the Dutch healthcare industry, will conduct a “very extensive” review of its recent divestment from five Israeli banks, according to its director, Peter Borgdorff.The pension fund has faced widespread criticism for the controversial decision, including allegations of pro-Palestinian bias. In early January, PGGM – the manager responsible for PFZW’s assets – announced that it planned to divest from the banks over their involvement in the financing of Israeli settlements in the “occupied Palestinian territories”.PGGM spokesman Maurice Wilbrink confirmed that the manager initiated its engagement with the banks, a process that led to their divestment, specifically at PFZW’s behest. The divestment has proved a highly contentious one, sparking demonstrations outsides PGGM’s offices, while the Israeli government summoned the Dutch ambassador to protest the move. In the fallout following the decision to divest from the banks, it came to light that Gert van Dijk, chairman of the PGGM council, was also a member of pro-Palestinian organisation ICCO.Further, Cees Flinterman, who is a member of PFZW’s ethical board, is also a board member of The Rights Forum, as well as a member of the Support Committee of the Russell Tribunal on Palestine, organisations that have been accused of having an anti-Israel agenda.Since then, Borgdorff has confirmed in his blog that pro-Palestinian organisations Cordaid, ICCO, IKV PaxChristi, Oxfam Novib, Watershed Working Group and the Dutch Palestine Komite, among others, had been actively lobbying the pension fund for “several years”, and that it incidentally provided pension funds to “some of them”. IPE understands that PFZW was lobbied by pro-Palestinian NGOs only.Meanwhile, ABP, Europe’s largest pension fund, announced in early February that it would not be following PGGM’s example, and that it disagreed with the manager’s assessment that the banks had acted in breach of “international law”.In a statement, it concluded that the Israeli banks in which it invests had done nothing to violate the UN Global Compact, or give cause to initiate a formal engagement process.In an interview with IP Nederland, Borgdorff conceded that PFZW had underestimated the extent to which its divestment would be perceived as a boycott, and confirmed the scheme would now launch a “very extensive” review of its decision-making process.“This whole process warrants a deep and extensive review, and one of the issues that will be reviewed is how should we view all this in relation to our peers, including ABP,” he said.“Does this mean we should change our policy to better suit the policy of others? No, we have our own policy, and we need to take our own responsibility.“But perhaps it does mean we should devote more time beforehand to get to know the policy of others because, based on what I read in the newspapers and websites, I cannot explain the difference in policy between PFZW and ABP, and yet those policies lead to entirely different outcomes.”When pressed by IP Nederland on Flinterman’s advisory role, Borgdorff explained that PFZW had wanted “somebody significant, somebody who is significant internationally as well”, and pointed out that Flinterman was a rapporteur on the Middle East conflict for the United Nations.When asked whether the pension fund might have sought a more objective adviser for the role, he said: “I’m sure we could have found someone else, but then we also would have asked for a balanced opinion.”Borgdorff said PFZW had reviewed its entire decision-making process, including the role of the ethical committee, the investment committee and the board.“We have literally pored over the minutes,” he said. He added: “We recently had protestors on our doorstep, and, to get in the office, you had to pass through 250 demonstrators, and that does have an impact. Our own PGGM staff started to question what it is we’re doing. And I think that is a good thing. Let’s have that discussion.”PFZW’s director also conceded that he personally had been unprepared for the “commotion” the decision had caused.“I have spoken with a lot of representatives from Jewish organisations in the Netherlands, and what has deeply touched and unsettled me is that these people and their constituents are truly fearful, truly concerned and saddened,” he said.“They are afraid there will be an anti-Israel mood in The Netherlands reminiscent of the 1930s, and they are no longer sure they are still welcome here, as human beings.“And then you think – we made an investment decision. We were aware of the fact this would have an impact. But did we foresee this would so deeply impact the very hearts and lives of people? Well, that was a good deal more intense than we were prepared for.”Joel Voordewind, an MP for the CU party, said PFZW had “given into” the boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement against Israel.“By acting like this, the scheme goes further than the policies of both the Dutch government and the EU, which advocate discouragement of investment in Israel’s occupied territories, rather than an outright boycott,” he said.He said the pension fund had effectively taken a political stance on behalf of its participants.Esther Voet, director of pro-Israel organisation The Centre for Information and Documentation on Israel, decried Flinterman’s involvement in the decision in particular.“PFZW is applying double standards,” she added, “as it is still invested in Chinese banks that are active in Tibet.”Meanwhile, a Dutch Jewish action group called Tradition is Our Future has called for a “counter boycott” of PGGM, and asked Jewish organisations in the US to put pressure on Emory University in Atlanta to expel Else Bos, PGGM’s chief executive, from an advisory committee.The conclusions of PFZW’s review are expected some time in mid-March.Flinterman has declined to comment, citing confidentiality.last_img read more

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Area Basketball Scores (1-6)

first_imgArea Basketball Scores.Wednesday  (1-6)Ripley County Boys Tourney.1st Round Games.Batesville  38     Milan  29South Ripley  63     Jac-Cen-Del  46Rivertown Classic Girls Tourney.1st Round Games @ South Dearborn.Switz. County  63     Lawrenceburg  46South Dearborn  66     Rising Sun  44last_img

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Basketball tournament to benefit Greensburg TLC

first_imgGREENSBURG, Ind. — A Basketball tournament will be held on Saturday (4/8) at the Greensburg First Christian Church.The tournament will benefit the Greensburg Transitional Living Center.Eight teams will compete for trophies and other prizes.The tournament is a three-on-three matchup and features teams representing area churches, businesses, and organizations.Each half court game will last around 30 minutes.The event is open to spectators free of charge.last_img

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Body found in Jupiter Farms near area of search for missing firefighter

first_imgThe Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office is reporting that a body has been found in Jupiter Farms near the area where rescuers were searching for a missing Broward County firefighter.The discovery was made Tuesday afternoon.James Von Minden was last seen Friday night after his truck hit a tree near the intersection of Randolph Siding Road and Alexander Run.Authorities had a running theory that the firefighter may have suffered a head injury in the accident and may have walked off disoriented or have been injured.While the body was found in the area of search for Minden, authorities have not identified the victim.last_img

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Squash Year in Review: We had a brilliant year – GSA president

first_imgTHE Guyana squash fraternity definitely took a blow this year with the relinquishing of the Junior Caribbean Area Squash Association (CASA) Championships title.However, that was just one blemish for an otherwise not-so-bad year for the racquet sports in Guyana.Notwithstanding the loss, the president of the Guyana Squash Association (GSA) considered the year to have been another great one for the sport.“We had a brilliant year. We won senior Caribbean titles. We hosted the junior CASA as you know, and even though we didn’t win overall, the hosting of that was successful. We had some really good local tournaments, where we saw our players step up and they are just progressing all the time. So I think we had a really good year,” says GSA president Robin Lowe.There’s nothing misplaced in Lowe’s optimistic viewpoint, there was a lot of good for the sport of squash this year.Encouragingly, senior Mary Fung-A-Fat officially announced that she was taking her pro career seriously. Promising junior player Shomari Wiltshire also performed on the international scene and indicated his seriousness for squash in the long run – something not expressed by many young squash players, despite their eminence on the regional circuit.Then there was the comeback, where Guyana returned to prominence as the Senior CASA Champions, clinching both the men’s and women’s title – something we haven’t done since 2014.However, we were once again pipped by Barbados for the overall title, after they came out with the better veterans’ team. consequentThe title wins were attained due to a batch of very strong seniors that included, on the female side, Fung-A-Fat, Taylor Fernandes who played her last year in the junior tournament this year, former national champion Ashley Khalil, Larissa Wiltshire, who herself aged out of the junior category just last year, and Victoria Arjoon.On the men’s side there were former Caribbean junior champions Jason Ray Khalil and Nyron Joseph and former senior Caribbean champion Richard Chin.Less than a decade ago Guyana struggled to gather senior players. Then the team was largely made up of junior players but there has been a continued improvement for the sport in the senior area.This shift to improved performances among the seniors is credited to many of the players who once ruled the junior scene sticking around to compete as seniors.But seeing these strong players age out of the junior category has taken its toll on the junior division, gradually weakening Guyana’s once impenetrable junior team, at a time when other countries, particularly Barbados, continue to see strengthening on their junior circuit.President of the Guyana Squash Association Robin LoweJust this year the junior team said goodbye to another two stalwarts: Taylor Fernandes, and Ben Mekdeci, who have both aged out of the division, leaving gaps that will be hard to fill.Guyana’s loss at Junior CASA came as no surprise to many who have been paying attention to the regional junior title. Barbados had been gaining on Guyana for some time now.Just a few years ago Guyana ended with as many five out of eight titles in the individual age group categories at Junior CASA. This year we barely managed to grasp two of the ten titles that were up for grabs;Barbados won six, while they made it to seven finals. It was somewhere around the time after Barbados collected all those individual titles that team Guyana braced for their overall loss.It was particularly sad that it had to come at a time when the tournament was being held on local soil. However, this of course by no means signals that Guyana’s done being the junior Caribbean champions.“It’s not going to be easy to get back up there but we’re by no means at the bottom of the barrel,” Lowe pointed out, further noting that: “We’re still pretty much one of the top teams, so we just have to continue and try to increase our focus and our training. The young talent that’s coming up is very promising.”Renowned national squash coach blamed Guyana’s slipping junior side on complacency, noting that perhaps we’ve just gotten too comfortable as winners.Meanwhile, the junior CASA was not the only loss for squash this year; Guyana’s pride and joy of squash, Nicolette Fernandes, officially announced her retirement as a pro player, ending a 15-year career. Not only that, there’s also no certainty if she will still look to represent Guyana at the senior level.With retirement plans forthcoming from Ince, Lowe says squash will suffer the loss of two legends. However, he assured that there will be persons there to fill the gap left by Ince, even if somewhat marginally.He has not officially said that he is retiring, but we expect it to come soon,” Lowe said.“Anytime you have legends like that leave the arena, there is some impact. I think he has done an outstanding job in coaching. But it’s not like we’re not going to have people. A lot of persons are following squash and are interested in helping the youths move through.”Now with the year concluded the focus is on picking up the pieces and moving on to the next. As it pertains to plans for next year, Lowe says nothing has been set in stone as yet, as the GSA executives will meet shortly to begin charting a course.As it is right now, an increase in emphasis of Guyanese players performing at more international tournaments is definitely on the cards. Another unofficial plan is the hosting of the Senior CASA.“There are plans for four players to go to Commonwealth Games and there are some other international tournaments that we’re going to be thinking about,” Lowe said. “Once we complete this year we will have a better idea of what will be done next year. We have to meet and come up with our game plan.”last_img read more

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Schools Battle for Zenith/Delta Principal’s Cup Zonal Tickets

first_imgThe school will now wait for the zonal draw to know their next opponents in the second stage of the annual secondary school football competition.According to the organisers, 25 other winners are expected to emerge from other Local Governments to complete the number for zonal draw.Head of the organising team, Tony Pemu, said the 26 LG qualifiers would be divided into eight after which the zonal champions would pick the quarterfinal tickets.“We are really excited that we started early and things are going as planned. There is a long way to go but recording a good start is also important for anyone aspiring to have a great race.“The way things are going so far, this edition will be much better than the maiden one in which we had to rush to present a representative for the annual Shell Cup Competition.”The preliminaries will be completed by end of November while December will be observed as break. Zonal and quarterfinals will be decided in January as the competition comes to a close in February.Zenith Bank revived the tournament with the first edition after 26 years of ‘no-show’.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram The Season 2 of the Zenith Bank sponsored Delta State Principal’s Cup has engaged many of the young ones in the state in the past three weeks.On Friday, the first qualifier for the next stage of the competition emerged from Oshimili South Local Government as officials forwarded Osa Dennis Secondary School as the qualifier from the LG.Osa Dennis in the deciding match at the weekend defeated West End Secondary School 1-0 courtesy of a penalty goal converted just 10 minutes to the end of the game.last_img read more

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Author shares stories of her difficult childhood

first_imgOn Tuesday night, in the Town and Gown Ballroom, author Alexandra Fuller discussed her best-selling 2003 book, Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood, in a  Visions and Voices event.Best-seller · Fuller shared with audience members her opinions on the value of free speech, applauding the United States’ for protecting that right. – Alison Brett | Daily TrojanThe work documents Fuller’s childhood in Rhodesia, current-day Zimbabwe, during the country’s struggle for independence. Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight explores the themes of war, love and death. Aside from Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight, Fuller’s other nonfiction books include Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier, which won the Lettre Ulysses Award for the Art of Reportage; The Legend of Colton H. Bryant and Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness.Fuller has also written numerous articles in publications including  Harper’s, National Geographic Magazine, The New Yorker Magazine and Vogue.Fuller’s Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight won the Royal Society of Literature’s Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize for best regional novel of the year and became a finalist for Guardian’s First Book Award and a New York Times notable book.At the event, Fuller described her childhood and compared it to her adulthood living and writing in the United States. She discussed the process of publishing Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight as well as her other three nonfiction books, which are also  memoirs.Fuller argued that the meaning of freedom of speech in the United States by saying that though the Constitution grants the right to speak freely, the right can sometimes not be used. For this reason, Fuller said that people from Zimbabwe seem very outspoken.“What I love is that my right not to lose my voice is protected,” Fuller said. “The U.S. gave me freedom of speech.”Fuller said that people in the United States can be labeled — she gave the example of how knowing she is vegetarian or African-American can change the way people view her.“Just because we are given freedom of speech doesn’t mean that we have an equal right to use it,” Fuller said.On the subject of apartheid, Fuller said that people longs for a sense of power. Power in her childhood came from English speakers and though the movement seemed to be about gaining power, apartheid leaders did not achieve the goal in the end.Fuller also spoke about the difficulty of being a female writer.“Thank you for having me to speak,” Fuller said. “The statistics have shown how many women are being published and how many women are being reviewed … and the statistics are appalling.”Students in attendance found the event moving.“I thought it was great that she could talk about something so serious and intertwine bits of humor throughout. I’m really excited to read her book,”  said Taylor Andes, a junior majoring in biology.Nikita Johri, a freshman majoring in cognitive science, thought that the author had interesting views on war.“It was incredibly interesting to hear her opinions and her viewpoints on war, on humanity and on just her life experience after reading the book,” Johri said.The night opened up to a question and answer session, which ranged from questions about Fuller’s opinions on war and the death penalty to appreciation for Fuller’s book from someone who grew up in Rhodesia in the audience.A reception and book signing followed Fuller’s talk and the event, which was free to students. The planners gave the first 100 students a free copy of Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight.last_img read more

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Out of the Park: Coronavirus fears could gravely impact sports events

first_imgAlthough we live in a digital age where games are readily accessible on various streaming platforms, the in-stadium experience remains vital for many fans, especially for a once-a-year event like March Madness. Without fan presence at games, leagues won’t bring in nearly as much revenue and teams won’t enjoy the advantage that comes with having a loud home crowd. But go to a sporting event, and it’s largely business as usual … for now. Many runners at the Los Angeles Marathon exhibited a similar degree of nonchalance. More than 27,000 participants came from all 50 states and over 78 countries, so some were concerned the event could be a breeding ground for such a highly transmissible virus. Although it may be easy for some fans and athletes to brush off the coronavirus threat in favor of engaging with the sports they love, the implications of the virus to athletic competitions are serious. Furthermore, these athletes are used to competing in front of a large crowd — take the fans away and you might get the energy of an informal scrimmage rather than a high-stakes sporting event. It might even be difficult to convince players to play in desolate arenas — after the NBA told teams that they may have to prepare to hold games in empty arenas, Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James told reporters, “I play for the fans. That’s what it’s all about. If I show up to the arena and there ain’t no fans there, I ain’t playing.” The TV viewing experience would also change drastically, as broadcasts often excite an at-home audience with clips of screaming fans, and the occasional roaring of the crowd can draw a viewer’s attention to a great play. Despite all this, Frank Luna, a participant in the marathon, told the Los Angeles Times he wasn’t concerned about his health going into the race. The empty-stadium measure has also been a concern for fans of NCAA basketball as March Madness begins March 17. NCAA Chief Medical Officer Brian Hainline told the Wall Street Journal that the tournament will be played without spectators in the “worst-case scenario.” The NCAA is also considering cutting down the number of locations for the opening round games. Yes, the Wildcats’ stadium is an open-air venue, but that doesn’t change the fact that those 12,181 people were sitting, cheering, eating and drinking in close proximity. Moreover, the fans’ apparent lack of response to the coronavirus threat was an odd contrast to the widespread paranoia present on social media today. Several major sports organizations are reconsidering how to keep their games going while preventing fans and players from getting sick. On Monday, the NHL, NBA, MLB and MLS issued a joint statement saying that they are closing locker rooms and clubhouses to the media. The NHL and NBA have advised their players not to shake hands with or accept gifts from fans after games. “We are very disappointed that the tournament will not take place, but the health and safety of the local community, fans, players, volunteers, sponsors, employees, vendors and everyone involved with the event is of paramount importance,” tournament director Tommy Haas said in a statement.center_img “I get it; it’s out there,” he said. “But we’ve had, what, one person die in California? I think I have a better chance of winning the lotto multiple times than getting it, and it’s pretty damn hard to win the lotto.” After circling Dignity Health Sports Park a good three times and walking up and down the stands, I failed to find a single person with a mask.  In short, the implications are innumerable. For now, the 16 cases in L.A. County may seem to be an idle threat, hardly enough to wear a mask to a sporting event when you could be happily enjoying nachos or a beer instead. I attended the Los Angeles Wildcats XFL game Sunday and figured I’d have ample material for a story on fans’ concerns about coronavirus, especially given the news that a food vendor who worked the Feb. 22 Seattle Dragons game tested positive. So I set out to interview someone wearing a protective mask. I didn’t think it would be challenging to find interviewees at a game with 12,181 fans. If you go to any airport in the United States today you’ll come across people wearing masks to protect against COVID-19. Stanford University and the University of Washington have already transitioned to virtual classes as a precaution to prevent community transmission of the virus, with USC getting set to follow. While the NCAA has not yet canceled its college basketball tournament, other major sporting events are on the chopping block. The BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells, Calif., was supposed to begin Monday, but its organizers announced Sunday that they would be postponing the tennis tournament indefinitely. But even if these events aren’t proven to spread the virus (at least not yet), the precautionary measures mandated by sports organizations could impact how games are played and consumed for months to come. Amanda Sturges is a sophomore writing about the impact of sports on society. She is also a features editor for the Daily Trojan. Her column, “Out of the Park,” runs every other Tuesday.last_img read more

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