Novel H1N1 influenza: Lessons learned and yet to be learned

first_img(CIDRAP Business Source Osterholm Briefing) – The irony is hard to miss. Much is being discussed and published about the “lessons learned” from the 2009 pandemic of the novel H1N1 influenza. And I expect the World Health Organization (WHO) will (as I did in my last column) finally call it a pandemic any moment now, based on extensive and growing transmission of the novel influenza virus in Australia and Europe.So the declaration of phase 6 is upon us—a moment we’ve much anticipated—and we’re already talking about lessons learned? Does that make sense?Yes—to a point.But stay tunedI’m all in favor of reviewing what’s worked well so far in our response to H1N1—and what needs fixing when examining any response to a public health threat. But I also think it’s critical to emphasize that we are not out of the woods yet with this pandemic.In other words, because we haven’t had all the lessons, we can’t know all the lessons. I wish I could know this virus won’t do a repeat of 1918. That year a wave of a novel H1N1 virus infection circulated around the world—also causing mild illness in humans. But obvious changes occurred in the virus during the summer months. And, in late August of 1918, what was a mild pandemic turned into a killer. There is still much to be learned about the current pandemic, and we must not lower our vigilance or spend much time patting ourselves on the back for what we did right when it began. Too much is still at stake.Given that caveat, yes, look at your organization’s response to the early stages of this pandemic. And with whatever information you glean, adjust your plan accordingly.At the top of the listIf you ask me, the biggest takeaway thus far is this: We have to stay nimble—and alert. And I’m talking about everyone from the WHO to national governments, C-suite executives, planners, media, and, ultimately, each individual.You need look no further than the flap over the WHO’s pandemic alert levels not accounting for severity to see why flexibility is a must.OK, so the WHO alert phases don’t include severity. What now? Are you going to wait for word from “on high” before you make your next move? Or are you going to take what you know at this point and ensure your organization is ready for any number of possibilities?I urge you to use common sense and reliable information.If your organization’s plans were tied to alert levels and assumed the scenario of a severe pandemic, great. You’ve thought through one of the possibilities. But now it’s time to adjust. The pandemic at this point isn’t severe, which is also great—and not the end of the story as far as we know.Shedding light on the questions Based on calls I’ve received in the past month from a variety of companies, I know you had to tackle some tricky challenges on the fly. For example, did you:Try to act on an agreement to reserve antivirals and run into any glitches?Enact a travel restriction order among your employees going to Mexico only to have to explain 2 weeks later why you weren’t enforcing a similar order for travel to New York City even though the city had documented as many confirmed cases as Mexico had in the early days?Try to order respirators or masks only to encounter a shortage or discover many were manufactured in the very country where the outbreak started and was most severe?Put in place stay-at-home policies for employees who had flu-like illness only to find you couldn’t count on anyone “certifying” they were clear to come back to work?Find that media coverage declined even as the WHO raised its pandemic alert level, thus making it hard to maintain credibility?Realize a need to be able to call on local public health officials and peers outside your organization to run a reality check or compare policies or practices?Have all reliable sources of information you needed so you could respond to questions from management, employees, and customers quickly?So now, go back to your plan, if you have one, and see how you can build greater flexibility into it. If you’re starting from scratch, know that being nimble is going to be a key to keeping your business alive.Remember: The plan is never finalFortunately, the disease the virus is causing is mostly mild and the number of deaths associated with the infection is well within the range of what we’d expect with a mild seasonal influenza season.But as sure as the sun rises in the east, I guarantee you there will many more lessons to learn and very likely more challenges to your organization’s plan.So while we all hope that we’ve dodged the bullet with this new H1N1 virus, we have a stark reminder of why we should not let down our guard: the events of 1918.We don’t have a clue if the same pattern will unfold with the new H1N1. But at CIDRAP Business Source, we’re not taking our eyes off this pandemic for a second.Bottom line for businessConsider the events of the past 6 weeks a wake-up call. In no way can we say yet that we’ve dodged the bullet. Learn what you can, especially about how to keep your plan flexible, and, to be sure, count on learning more.last_img read more

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COVID-19 patients in West Nusa Tenggara break out of isolation, pray at mosques

first_img“Based on his statement, he walked westward passing through the Central Lombok Council building,” said Omdah.He went on to say that SL had stopped at a mosque in Batujai village.“The patient said he performed subuh [dawn prayer] at Wage Mosque and later proceeded toward Panujak village, where he was found by health workers in the morning,” Omdah said.Read also: Outbreak breakout: COVID-19 patient flees isolation ward in JakartaAnother incident occurred in the provincial capital of Mataram, where a COVID-19 patient placed under isolation went out and participated in congregational tarawih (evening Ramadan prayers) at a local mosque.A team from a community health center (Puskesmas) in Taliwang was deployed to conduct contact tracing on the patient, a 57-year-old man identified as S.  “The patient was not at home when we visited him,” Cakranegara district head Erwan said on Thursday as quoted by kompas.com.He added that S was supposed to self-isolate upon returning from Gowa, where he attended an Islamic event last month.S, who had previously tested positive for COVID-19, did not immediately report the test result to health authorities. The patient initially resisted being placed under isolation, but eventually relented.The patient has since been taken to Mataram General Hospital for quarantine, Erwan said.West Nusa Tenggara has recorded 221 confirmed cases and four deaths linked to the disease as of Wednesday. Provincial capital Mataram is the outbreak epicenter in the region, with 77 COVID-19 cases and two deaths due to the disease. (rfa)Topics : “We finally found him in a field near the Lombok International Airport overpass,” an unidentified person recording the video said in the footage.SL recently traveled to Gowa, where more than 8,200 people gathered for an international Islamic event last month, and has since tested positive for COVID-19. Central Lombok Health Agency head Omdah confirmed the authenticity of the video.  Several COVID-19 patients in West Nusa Tenggara with a recent travel history to a tabligh (Islamic mass gathering) in Gowa, South Sulawesi have escaped quarantine, putting others in their vicinity at risk of contracting the disease.A confirmed case in Central Lombok regency, identified as 50-year-old SL, broke out of isolation at a local hospital and walked home.He snuck out of an isolation room at Praya General Hospital on Tuesday evening. His escape attempt was recorded by a hospital CCTV camera, as reported by kompas.com.center_img SL was later found in a field in Penujak village located nearly 10 kilometers from the hospital and taken back to the hospital by local health workers. The video depicting the encounter, as well as CCTV recording of SL’s escape has since circulated on social media.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Applauds Victims, District Attorney on Conviction of Bill Cosby

first_img April 26, 2018 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Governor Wolf Applauds Victims, District Attorney on Conviction of Bill Cosbycenter_img National Issues,  Press Release,  Statement Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today applauded District Attorney Kevin Steele and the fearless victims for the conviction of sexual offender Bill Cosby.“The conviction of Bill Cosby on all three counts of assault is vindication for his many victims and the service of justice for Mr. Cosby’s heinous and cruel crimes,” said Governor Wolf.“To use any level of celebrity and power to prey on women is unforgivable and deplorable. I could not be more pleased with the verdict handed down today and I hope it provides some level of comfort to the victims of sexual assault across Pennsylvania and the country. The women who have come forward are strong and brave, and they have delivered hope to the countless women whose abusers have yet to be held accountable.“I thank Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele for his tireless work to bring this case to its successful resolution.”Pennsylvania Victim Advocate Jennifer Storm added her statement to the governor’s.“Today’s conviction of Bill Cosby serves as true vindication and validation of all the brave women who have come forward with similar stories of sexual assault. I applaud the Montgomery County District Attorney’s office for their thoughtful and conscientious defense of these women. I further commend them for not giving up on these victims, when so many others had in the past. The victims who have watched their offender walk above the law because of his status will hopefully feel redemption in the face of all the speculation and condemnation they have endured over these years. Today, justice was served.”last_img read more

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Ireland and France Seek Celtic Interconnector Backing form EU

first_imgIrish Prime Minister, Leo Varadkar and President of France Emmanuel Macron have submitted a joint request to the European Commission seeking financial support for the Celtic Interconnector electricity link between Ireland and France.Varadkar and Macron co-signed a letter today before the European Council meeting in Brussels, requesting Jean-Claude Juncker’s support for the grant application.The Celtic Interconnector will provide the first direct link between Ireland’s electricity network and mainland Europe, which will be vital for the post-Brexit landscape. The Taoiseach and President Macron pledged to pursue the project at their recent bilateral meeting in Paris.Speaking after signing the letter, Varadkar, said:“The Celtic Interconnector will help to reduce electricity prices, support climate action, and provide greater energy security for Ireland. Our two countries are working together to seek EU funding for 60% of the overall €1 billion cost of the project, with the balance coming from commercial revenue.“I’m delighted that France has agreed to join Ireland in making this grant application, and I particularly want to thank President Macron for his personal support. This demonstrates the ever-closer relationship between Ireland and France, which will be Ireland’s closest EU neighbour when the UK leaves. I also welcome the excellent co-operation between the Irish and French national regulatory authorities.”last_img read more

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Bulldogs Tracksters Defeat Pirates

first_img2nd PlaceJoey Woods (100M) 12.3Vincent Pay (300H)  49.6Hunter Butz (800M)  2:15.9Sawyer Sanders (3200M)  11:41.10Charlie Pumphrey (Pole Vault)  9’0” 400m relay of: Gabi Gibbs, Lilly Meyer, Roxie Hund, Stephanie Nobbe; 1600m relays of: Adam Moster, Tyler Meyers, Kavin Saravanan, JJ Kuisel and Katie Olsen, Liz Loichinger, Gabi Gibbs and Carley Pride; 3200m relays of: JJ Kuisel, Joshua Myers, Benjamin Moster, Adam Moster and Liz Loichinger, Lily Pinckley, Trysta Vierling and Katie Olsen.Taking home the red ribbons for 2nd place were: 110m hurdles: Chase Hamilton; 100m dash: Lilly Meyer; 200m dash: Isaiah Riffle; 400m dash: JJ Kuisel; 800m run: Liz Loichinger; 1600m run: Adam Moster and Liz Loichinger; 3200m run: Lily Pinckley; High Jump: Kent Meyers and Gabi Gibbs; Long Jump: Justin Heiser and Callie Main; Shot Put: Adam Bedel and Gabi Gibbs; Discus: Adam Bedel and Katie Bedel.And finishing out the scoring for the night winning 3rd place were: 100m dash: Justin Heiser; 200m dash: Charlie Laymon and Lilly Meyer; 300m hurdles: Chase Hamilton and Katie Bohman; 800m run: Benjamin Moster; 1600m run: Benjamin Moster 4 x 800 split time-Adam Hollowell; 400m dash-Kavin Saravanan, Vonley Hund, Kasin Hughes; 4 x 400 split time-Tyler Meyers, Kavin Saravanan, Johnathan Lynch; High Jump-Kent Meyers, Gabe Gunter, Johnathan Lynch; Long Jump-Charlie Laymon; Shot Put-Sam Sittloh and Jack Forbeck; Discus-Katie Bedel, Taylor Townsley and Georgie Doll.Great way to start off the season Dogs!  Batesville will compete again next Tuesday at home against Franklin County.  Action begin at 5 pm.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Lisa Gausman.The Lady Pirates hosted Batesville Thursday night. The Greensburg Girls lost 41-91 on the incredibly windy and cool evening. Senior Lily Grimes won both her events by very large margins. Grimes tossed 40’9.5″ in shot put over 9 feet farther then all her opponents. In discus Grimes extended her lead over 30 feet with a 105’9 throw. Brenner Hanna also won both her events with large margins. She won the 1600 in 5:38.9 and the 3200 in 12:01.5.Other scorers of the evening includedRunner Up Finishes. Mary West – 100 hurdles & 200; Koregan Kidd – Pole Vault; Kayla Haycock – 400; Emily Million – 300 hurdles.3rd Place Finishes. Mary West – 100; Emily Million – 100 hurdles; Emily Mangels – 1600 & 800; Hilary Ernstes – 400; Kayla Haycock – Long Jump.Other highlights of the evening included some personal record performances against some incredibly windy conditions. India Benefiel improved in the 200 and Sarah Santiago improved in the 3200.The Lady Pirates will be back in action on Saturday at home as they host the Crossbones Relays.Courtesy of Pirates Coach Katina Tekulve.The Greensburg Boys Track & Field team opened their outdoor season hosting Batesville on Thursday. Freshmen Matt Boone won the Shot Put with a throw of 46’2 ¼”, which is the second best throw for any freshmen in school history.  Daimon Austin also had a big night bringing home three 1st place ribbons, long jump, 100M, and 4x100M relay.1st PlaceDaimon Austin (100M)  12.24x100M Relay (Daimon Austin, Vincent Pavy, Jalen Woods, & Joey Woods)  46.15Daimon Austin (Long Jump)  19’0”John Redelman (Discus)  114’9”Matthew Stewart (Pole Vault)  9’6”Matt Boone (Shot Put)  46’ 2 ¼” 3rd PlaceJalen Woods (110H)  20.6Nick Zapfe ( 400M)  56.5Andrew Johnson (3200M) 11:41.11Joey Woods (Long Jump)  18’ ¼”Blaine Schroeder (Discus)  100’ 1 ½”Collin Springmeyer (High Jump)  5’4”Jalen Woods  (Shot Put)  39’ 2 ½”Courtesy of Pirates Coach Shawn Ruble.center_img 3200m run: Trysta Vierling; High Jump: Katie Bedel; Shot Put: Katie Bedel; Discus: Callie Main; Pole Vault: Zach Gutzwiller and Katie Bedel.Again, the winds were super strong at times and many events were facing that wind head on, making for tough running, throwing and jumping conditions.  Despite this, the Bulldogs had several athletes start off the season with a personal best. The Batesville High School Track Team opened up their outdoor season tonight with a double victory over the Greensburg Pirates. The boys won 80-52, while the girls ran away with the victory 91-41.  The boys came away champions in 10 of the 16 events with the girls winning 12.  Despite the 17 mph windy conditions, the threat of showers stayed away and the early spring season air made it feel just like it should for the opening of the 2019 track season.Batesville had several individuals who were multiple blue ribbon winners. Senior Stephanie Nobbe brought home the most with 4 winning all 4 of the events she was in which included PV (8’0″), 100m dash (13.78). 200m dash (28.39) and the 400m relay (54.33).  Way to go Stephanie!Other 1st place winners were: 110/100m hurdles: Roxie Hund and Adam Bedel; 200m dash: Sam Haskamp; 300m hurdles: Tyler Meyers and Roxie Hund; 400m dash: Vonley Hund and Carley Pride; 800m run: Adam Moster and Katie Olsen; 1600m run: Joshua Myers; 3200m run: Joshua Myers; High Jump: Gabe Gunter and Carley Pride; Long Jump: Lilly Meyerlast_img read more

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Louis E. Tebbe

first_imgLouis E. Tebbe, age 95 of Batesville, died Thursday, May 23, 2019 at Ripley Crossing.  Born March 21, 1924 in Franklin County Indiana, he is the son of Anna (Nee: Dickman) and William Tebbe. He Married Sylvia Krieger October 9, 1948 at St. Martin’s Church in Yorkville, Indiana and she preceded him in death December 1, 2003.Louie farmed for over 60 years before retiring in 1992.  He was a good businessman and proud that he treated everyone fairly in his business dealings.  A member of St. Louis Church, his faith was important.  He supported the church and its’ functions throughout his lifetime.  When Louie retired and moved to town, he quickly became a fixture as he walked daily and meticulously cared for his lawn.  He put the same care and effort into his garden each year.  According to his family, Louie was an avid card player and loved 500.He is survived by his daughters Mary Hornbach of Harrison, Ohio, Luann Anderson of Broadway, North Carolina; grandchildren Kirsten Hornbach of Taylor Mill, Kentucky and Morgan Anderson and Carter Anderson, both of Broadway, North Carolina.  In addition to his wife and parents, he is also preceded in death by sisters Mary Jane Tebbe, Marian Bischoff, Monica Ruberg, Florence Sturwold and brothers John, William and Francis Tebbe.Visitation is Wednesday, May 29th, from 9 – 11 a.m. at the Weigel Funeral Home.  Funeral services follow at 11:30 a.m. with Rev. Stan Pondo officiating and burial in the church cemetery.  The family requests memorials to St. Louis School or the St. Louis Cemetery Fund.  For online condolences go to www.weigelfh.com.last_img read more

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USC heads to Denver for MPSF tourney

first_imgAfter finishing its regular season in style with a 16-4 romping of conference foe San Diego State last Saturday, April 25, the USC women’s lacrosse team will begin their postseason on Saturday at the MPSF Conference Tournament in Denver, Colorado.Though the team has yet to find out who they will match up with — that will be determined by the winner of a Friday night bout between Oregon and tournament host Denver — the Women of Troy will be riding a fair amount of regular season conference confidence after finishing second in the MPSF with an 8-1 record and a 12-4 record overall.Only undefeated MPSF Conference champion Stanford finished with more conference wins than the Women of Troy, who made significant gains in just their third year as a program. Last year, the team finished 9-9 overall after tallying an 8-10 record in their inaugural 2013 season.USC’s only losses on the year came against ranked opponents, and among their conference victories they boast victories over each potential Saturday opponent.The Women of Troy defeated Oregon 13-11 on the road on Friday, April 3 behind four-goal outbursts from two sophomore attackers in Michaela Michael and Cynthia Del Core. The team defeated Denver in their final home game of the season on Sunday, April 12 by a decisive 16-4 score.USC had four players tally hat tricks in the rout, as junior attacker Caroline Cordrey, junior midfielder Amanda Johansen, sophomore attacker/midfielder Kylie Drexel and Michael all put home three goals during the senior day celebration.If the Pioneers come away victorious on Friday, they will undoubtedly have revenge on their minds after being embarrassed in their regular season matchup with USC. Despite the loss, Denver finished third in the MPSF with a 7-2 conference record and 12-4 overall record.Denver boasts a formidable offensive attack that will lead a bid to defend their 2014 MPSF Conference title.The Pioneers are led by senior attacker and main facilitator Jill Remenapp, who has tallied 56 points on 19 goals and 37 assists this season. Redshirt freshman attacker Nicole Martindale leads the team with 33 goals scored on the year, and senior midfielder Kiki Boone has added 29 goals of her own while winning 52 draw controls.Should the Women of Troy have to match up with Oregon, they will be facing a 10-7 regular season team with a 4-5 conference record. USC’s two goal victory over the Ducks earlier in the season, however, marked the closest conference game the team has played this season.The Ducks boast two                  30-plus goal scorers in junior midfielder Carly O’Connell (32) and senior attacker Olivia Pyne (34). Freshman attacker Cambi Cukar has dished 35 assists this season, helping set up her fellow teammates.O’Connell has also won 51 draw controls and collected 26 ground balls this year.No matter which team USC will battle with on Saturday, as long as they focus on their own effort first, they are confident in their chances.“The most important thing is for us to continue to improve on things from our last game against San Diego State,” head coach Lindsay Munday said. “We have the game film from both Oregon and Denver and we’ve been preparing for both, but because we won’t know until Friday, we are planning on taking care of ourselves first and then making the adjustment to whichever team we end up facing later.”Ready to lead the Women of Troy offensively against either opponent will be team           points-leader in junior attacker Cara de Lyra, who has tallied a 60 points on 32 goals and 28 assists this season.De Lyra has been instrumental in setting up teammates Michael (46 goals and 11 assists) and Johansen (37 goals and 10 assists), helping the Women of Troy flaunt a very balanced scoring attack.“I get more hyped up when I get an assist, instead of a goal,” de Lyra said. “I really like to see the other girls on the team scoring and playing really well together. That’s all that matters.”Defensively, USC will be anchored by a collection of mainstays in junior Courtney Tarleton, sophomore Nina Kelty, and seniors Kaitlyn Couture and Kaila Sommi, among others.Anchoring the Women of Troy is standout freshman goalie Gussie Johns, who has made 74 saves while holding opponents to a 7.58 goals-against average in a stellar first-year campaign.Though the pressures of the playoffs may be enough to faze certain teams, the Women of Troy are confident that together as a unit, they will be ready to perform. Their strong team cohesiveness and depth have been season-long calling cards, and are crucial to the team’s success.“Our team chemistry is really great this year,” Kelty said. “We are really hard to scout because we have so many people coming in and out and scoring and winning draw controls and contributing. It makes us hard to scout because we are so unpredictable.”The first faceoff for Saturday’s matchup is set for 6 p.m.last_img read more

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The life of a Syracuse men’s basketball student manager

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on March 12, 2018 at 4:37 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 The only student manager who sits on the Syracuse bench during games has one job far more important than the others: get Jim Boeheim his stool and clipboard.An SU senior and head student manager, Ricky Pasternak’s primary duty on game day is to show up on time. It is to ensure Boeheim has his clipboard and stool during timeouts. And it is to complete one other task vital to the routine of Syracuse’s 42-year head coach: hand Boeheim his Pepsi during halftime and after the game.Student managers are rarely credited for their efforts, reacting like a NASCAR pit crew during timeouts to set up chairs and distribute water bottles and towels. That’s just what casual fans might see if they’re paying close enough attention. What they don’t see is the nearly 40-hour weeks that managers log, setting up practices, rebounding, laying out cones, cleaning up, doing laundry and throwing towels on players’ shoulders when they take a breather. They don’t see the managers hauling luggage onto planes and buses in the wee hours, cutting film or running Syracuse’s camps during the summer.“In a way, they’re holding the program together,” said Kip Wellman, SU’s director of basketball operations and Boeheim’s right-hand man.The grunt work, members of the program said, is hardly recognizable, yet it’s what stitches together the whole entity. And unlike just about every other Syracuse student, the managers won’t get time off over spring break. Many of them will remain in Syracuse or travel with the Orange (20-13, 8-10 Atlantic Coast) for its game Wednesday night in the First Four against Arizona State.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textStudent managers are at the low end of the basketball food chain, but they are vital to Syracuse. The menial jobs are coveted. There are about 20 to 30 applicants per year, said CB Garrett, a manager who is a junior at SU. About five each year make the cut, after the other applicants are sifted out via a 15-minute interview. Most students who become managers have their eye on a future career in sports.For many of the 20 or so student managers on this year’s team, becoming a student manager was a dream as early as high school. Garrett said there are already about 10 high school seniors who have contacted SU’s managers inquiring about the application process. Around the first week of classes, interviews are held in the Carmelo K. Anthony Basketball Center, where managers spend much of their time when not in class or on the road with the team.“Before my sophomore or junior year of high school, I knew I wanted to be a basketball manager,” said Garrett, who stopped by the basketball office when he visited SU. “You’re getting kids like me who really want to do it, because you don’t get a ton of sleep on the road and you don’t get to see your family much.”Garrett said he has been home all of three days since the start of the school year in August. That’s not uncommon, given that about four managers travel to road games, while the others assist with game day preparation for home games and daily practices.“If we don’t have class, we’re supposed to be at practice,” said Nick Giancola, a freshman student manager. “We set up the water cart, make sure the basketballs are out, rebound. You name it.”Courtesy of CB GarrettGiancola is Boeheim’s nephew, a relationship he said helped him land the gig at SU. He “really wants to play” college hoops and is “not quite giving up on that dream.” Having access to the Melo Center from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m., he said, gives him time to work on his game. He may consider trying to walk-on at Syracuse, like former manager and current SU reserve Patrick Herlihy.For years, Giancola has been interested in sports, ever since he was a little kid growing up in Lexington, Kentucky, and took informal basketball lessons from Wellman. Giancola’s connection with Boeheim and Wellman led to him to be a student manager at Syracuse over Ohio State, he said.One of a manager’s most basic and most important tasks is rebounding. There is an art they must learn. On a single basket before or after practice, three managers, ideally, rebound for a single player: one person in front of the shooter, one under the basket and one guy floating around, judging the trajectory of the shots and anticipating where the rebound may go.“Rebounding, it’s like the No. 1 thing we have to master,” Giancola said.That’s during practice, hardly where the real work begins. Syracuse starts most practices at 4 p.m. But Garrett shows up around 2 p.m. to help set up and he doesn’t leave until 7 p.m. He stays after practice to assists players in getting extra work, or he completes shot charts. On home gamedays, for a 7 p.m. tip, he arrives at Melo around 2 p.m. ahead of a 2:30 team meeting. Then managers head to the Carrier Dome around 3 p.m. and stick around until 10:30 that evening.When SU’s bigs work out, managers play so-called dummy defense. At 6-foot-4, 185 pounds, Garrett said he is the biggest manager at SU, meaning he matches up with the bigs. He’s learned the art of holding a pad to mimic a defender while applying good resistance. He tore the labrum in his right shoulder last summer during a similar drill.Save for access to players and the game, the hidden gem of managing may be pick-up hoops. They can play virtually anytime in Melo with the swipe of their SUID. Three or four days per week, Garrett said a few managers play with assistant coach Gerry McNamara and assistant strength and conditioning coach Eric Devendorf, both former Syracuse standouts. Over winter break, Syracuse commit Buddy Boeheim joined in.But after the fun, after practices and after games, comes one of the more dreaded tasks: laundry duty. A handful of managers have stayed after practice for three or four additional hours to complete several loads of laundry.“Laundry is never the most fun thing,” Garrett said. “Takes almost three hours a day. The worst part is you can’t start until everyone leaves. All the guys, they’ll shoot, go in weight room, then shower. Only after everyone showers can you start the laundry.”Before home games, managers set up the water jugs on a white Gatorade crate on wheels. They prepare cups, tissues and lots of gum. Garrett has lost three jacket buttons trying to reach for water during games. During practice, they almost always have a towel over their shoulder in the case that a player falls. They wipe that spot on the floor to rid the sweat, another way in which managers ensure things run smoothly.“If the program’s a car,” junior point guard Frank Howard said, “they’re like the oil.” Commentslast_img read more

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Willie Mullins takes the feature at Fairyhouse

first_imgThe feature at 1.55 – was won by no.2 Morning Run 4/5 f2.30 – won by no.11 Hostile Fire 3/13.05 – won by no.16 Velvet Maker 4/5 f3.40 – won by no.2 Missyspet 7/14.15 – won by no.2 Whistle Dixie 8/11 f Today’s winners from Fairyhouse saw the: 12.50 – won by no.7 Los Amigos 7/21.20 – won by no.9 Mr Shankly 13/2last_img

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Paul Gascoigne needs immediate help, says his agent

first_imgPaul Gascoigne’s agent says the former England footballer’s life is in danger after he started drinking again.The 45-year-old was shaking and slurred his words on stage at a charity event in Northampton on Thursday.Gascoigne, who openly admits to having problems with alcoholism, has spent time in rehab and was sectioned twice in 2008 under the Mental Health Act.His agent Terry Baker told BBC Radio 5 live: “He won’t thank me for saying it but he immediately needs to get help.” Baker added: “Whatever’s happened to him in the five or six weeks since I saw him before Christmas, he is not as well as he has been.“His life is always in danger because he is an alcoholic. Maybe no one can save him – I don’t know. I really don’t know.” Gascoigne’s former Tottenham and England team-mate and Match of the Day presenter Gary Lineker tweeted: “Lots of you asking for my thoughts on Gazza’s plight. I can only hope he finds peace somehow, but fear those hopes may be forlorn.”The Professional Footballers’ Association say they will continue to support Gascoigne, as they have in the past.A statement on their website reads: “The PFA continues to be concerned about Paul Gascoigne’s welfare.“The Union has provided assistance financially and medically, supporting the provision of rehabilitation and treatments received both in the UK and abroad.“The PFA recently arranged a detoxification for Paul through the Sporting Chance Clinic. Regrettably Paul checked himself out and chose not to complete the programme. “We would like to stress that the support of the PFA and the Tony Adams Sporting Chance Clinic remain available both to Paul and any other members in a similar need or circumstance.”PFA chief executive Gordon Taylor fears that Gascoigne could end up like former Manchester United winger George Best.The Northern Irishman died in 2005 aged just 59 after a long struggle with alcoholism.“We are in regular touch with him and have been again. We go one step forward and two back at times and this is just the situation,” Taylor said.“If we are not careful, it is going to be akin to George Best. It is unfortunate, but we try to keep going.” Gascoigne’s drinking problems started during his playing days. In 1998, shortly after his divorce from wife Sheryl, he was admitted to the The Priory Hospital in Marchwood, near Southampton, to receive treatment for stress and drink problems.In 2001, whilst playing at Everton, Gascoigne admitted himself to an alcohol rehabilitation clinic in Arizona on the insistence of his then manager Walter Smith.Four years after retiring, in 2008, he was arrested in Newcastle and detained under the Mental Health Act and was later sectioned following reports that he was acting strangely in Hemel Hempstead. More recently he has been treated at The Priory again and the Providence Projects treatment centre in Bournemouth.The former Newcastle, Tottenham and Lazio player was appearing in “An Evening with Paul Gascoigne” at the Park Inn in Northampton on Thursday and Baker says that he tried to cancel the show after he saw that Gascoigne was drinking. He said: “He wasn’t in the condition he’d been in for the last two years. He was slurring a bit.“I phoned the organisation and said it was possibly best we didn’t put him on but he was insistent he had some new jokes and he was going to be in tip-top form. He was fairly upset but insisted he wanted to go on.“When he came on the stage, we sat him down and he just started shaking. He’s always a bit nervous on the stage, but he just started shaking uncontrollably.”When asked why Gazza was upset, Baker explained that a friend had recently died in a medical facility – whilst holding his hand – and that it was “haunting him”.Baker says he spoke to Gascoigne again on Saturday and that he was “fairly incoherent”. Former Manchester United goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel has called on the PFA to do more to help Gascoigne. After a video of the event in Northampton was put on The Sun’s website, Schmeichel wrote on Twitter : “This is not fun watching. Gazza needs help. Come on PFA and (PFA chief executive) Gordon Taylor, time to step up.“We are all responsible for how we live our lives. But that doesn’t mean we can’t step in and help.“There is always a ‘right’ time to start doing something, with what we’ve seen from Gazza, time has come for football.”Baker said he hadn’t witnessed the former footballer drink alcohol in two years. He said: “I swear to you I have never seen Paul drink in all the time I’ve known him, until very, very recently.“He has definitely been clean for most of the last two years, absolutely for definite. He has made huge massive efforts to get his life on track and it’s just gone a bit wrong at the moment.”last_img read more

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