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5 Sources of Alternative Energy You May Not Have Heard Of

first_imgCould the mining moon provide a source of energy for Earth? Trade-offs reveal no clear favorites in alternative energy market More information: Mother Nature Network: www.mnn.com/earth-matters/ener … -never-heard-3#image (PhysOrg.com) — As fossil fuels increasingly fall out of favor, many are looking into alternative energy sources to help us power our lives with a smaller impact on the environment. You already know about solar power and wind energy, and hydro-electric power and nuclear power have been around for decades. But scientists are increasingly looking to the natural world for additional solutions. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: 5 Sources of Alternative Energy You May Not Have Heard Of (2010, February 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-02-sources-alternative-energy-heard.html Here are 5 alternative energy sources that you may hearing more of soon:• Helioculture: The idea is to create hydrocarbons with a little help from the sun. Brackish water is combined with photosynthetic organisms, nutrients and carbon dioxide and left in the sun. This process results in hydrocarbons that are ready for use a fuel — not refining necessary.• Sewage: Our waste can…reduce waste. Using microbial fuel cells, sewage can be used in bio-electrochemical systems to create power. In fact, Norway has plans to begin using human waste to power the buses in Oslo.• Evaporation: Apparently, scientists are working on ways to harness the difference in electrical properties that exist between air and water. In order to make this work, a special kind of “leaf” is micro-fabricated. Air bubbles are pumped in, and as the water evaporates, the power is captured. Although it does seem like a lot of work for what might not be too much power…• Human movement: Could the expanding planetary population actually power itself through movement? There are thoughts that piezoelectricity could be generated with the use of special tiles placed in strategic places where people walk. These tiles would be made out of materials that generate energy in response to mechanical stress applied on them. As people walked to the bus, or jogged in the park, their pressure on these tiles could produce power.• Moon: For some time, scientists have considered ways to produce Helium-3, which is a non-radioactive possibility for mostly clean energy. However, creating He-3 on earth is a real pain. However, our near neighbor, the moon, has this light isotope in abundance. Could we see mines on the moon, working to tap into this source of possible energy? Maybe. One Russian company, RKK Energiya, thinks that moon mining for Helium-3 could be a possibility by 2020.It is clear that we do need to start using our innovation to look for alternative sources of energy. It will be interesting to see which (if any) of these alternative energy sources actually become viable.last_img read more

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Proposed gammaray laser could emit nuclear light

first_img “Photons in a normal laser are emitted by atoms, by ions, and so on,” Tkalya told PhysOrg.com. “In the nuclear gamma-ray laser, the photons are emitted by atomic nuclei.”In the study, which is published in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters, Tkalya explains that a nuclear gamma-ray laser has to overcome at least two basic problems: accumulating a large amount of isomeric nuclei (nuclei in a long-lived excited state) and narrowing down the gamma-ray emission line. The new proposal fulfills these requirements by taking advantage of thorium’s unique nuclear structure, which enables some of the photons from an external laser to interact directly with thorium’s nuclei rather than its electrons.Tkalya’s proposal uses a lithium-calcium-aluminum-fluoride (LiCaAlF6) compound, in which some of the calcium is replaced with thorium. After a sufficient amount of isomeric thorium nuclei have been excited by an external laser, the nuclei can interact with a surrounding electric or magnetic field to create a population inversion, so that the system contains more excited nuclei than unexcited nuclei. (In a regular laser, a population inversion usually involves getting more electrons in a higher energy level than a lower energy level.) Then, Tkalya showed that the nuclei can emit or absorb photons without recoil, allowing them to produce light without losing energy.“The nuclear gamma-ray laser considered in my article can emit ‘visible’ (vacuum ultraviolet [VUV]) light (or gamma-rays of the optical range) only,” Tkalya said.As Tkalya explained, a nuclear gamma-ray laser could open up several interesting applications, although he has not thoroughly investigated them yet. One possibility is that the gamma-ray emission of the excited thorium nuclei is in the optical range called “nuclear light.”“In my opinion, it is interesting to see a ‘nuclear light,’” he said. “An application of nuclear light is the nuclear metrological standard of frequency, or the ‘nuclear clock.’”In addition, the device could be used to test many fundamental properties of nature, such as the exponentiality of the decay law and the effect of the variation of the fine structure constant. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. New territory in nuclear fission explored with ISOLDE More information: E.V. Tkalya. “Proposal for a Nuclear Gamma-Ray Laser of Optical Range.” Physical Review Letters 106, 162501. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.162501AbstractA possibility of the amplification of the 7.6 eV γ radiation by the stimulated γ emission of the ensemble of the 229mTh isomeric nuclei in a host dielectric crystal is proved theoretically. This amplification is a result of (1) the excitation of a large number of 229mTh isomers by laser radiation, (2) the creation of the inverse population of nuclear levels in a cooled sample owing to the interaction of thorium nuclei with the crystal electric field or with an external magnetic field, (3) the emission or absorption of the optical photons by thorium nuclei in the crystal without recoil, and (4) the nuclear spin relaxation through the conduction electrons of the metallic covering.center_img Copyright 2011 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. (PhysOrg.com) — Building a nuclear gamma-ray laser has been a challenge for scientists for a long time, but a new proposal for such a device has overcome some of the most difficult problems. In the new study, Eugene Tkalya from the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Moscow State University has theoretically proven how the stimulated gamma emission of thorium nuclei can emit coherent visible light. Although the nuclear gamma-ray laser emits light based on stimulated emission, it operates a bit differently than a normal laser. Citation: Proposed gamma-ray laser could emit ‘nuclear light’ (2011, May 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-gamma-ray-laser-emit-nuclear.htmllast_img read more

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3D Builder is free 3D printing app for Windows 81

first_img Explore further Citation: 3D Builder is free 3D printing app for Windows 8.1 (2013, November 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-11-3d-builder-free-app-windows.html More information: blogs.windows.com/windows/b/wi … -to-windows-8-1.aspxapps.microsoft.com/windows/en- … e9-a62f-29590d5781f2 MakerBot printers come to more Microsoft stores This is a 3D printing application for Windows 8.1 designed to further encourage the consumer growth in 3D printers. The app is being made available for free, and it can be downloaded from the Windows Store. Users will need to have Windows 8.1 and also will need a Windows 8.1-compatible printer. “A few months ago, you may have heard that Windows 8.1 makes 3D printing possible because it is native to the operating system, meaning the OS offers plug-and-play support for printers, understands 3D file formats, and connects lots of apps with lots of hardware to deliver offering a seamless printing experience for customers,” blogged Kristina Libby, Global Consumer PR Lead. “Now, with the 3D Builder app, we’ve made it even easier for people to create and print objects in 3D.”The user can create ornaments, toys or pocket items by drawing from a catalog of templates supplied (template designs include snowflakes, a money clip, and toy train, for example) or by customizing items and creating one’s own. Libby, in her blog post, noted how one can be creative with designs via the user interface: “The clean, simple user interface lets you scale, rotate and adjust what you want to print.” It is also possible for a user to add multiple objects to a single print, or to stack or push objects into one another to create new ones, she said.Earlier this year, in another Microsoft blog, Redmond announced that the Windows 8.1 update will have built-in support for 3D printing. Microsoft also made a move to sell MakerBot printers in its retail stores, so that a wider audience would be introduced to the experience of designing and producing real items through a printer, namely, the MakerBot Replicator 2 machine. MakerBot, founded in 2009, has been a leading name in the desktop 3D printer market. The Replicator 2 is promoted as a fast and easy to use tool for making professional-quality models. Libby said, “3D Systems, MakerBot and TierTime will be supporting Windows 8.1 in time for the holiday season.”Microsoft’s decision to develop a 3D printing app for Windows 8.1 comes at a time when Microsoft shows confidence that 3D printing will experience growth in the coming years. In the June blog about 3D printing, Shanen Boettcher, General Manager of the Startup Business Group at Microsoft, said, “But will 3D printing go mainstream? We think so – which is why we’ve built it into Windows.” This includes plug-n-play support for printers, enabling apps to submit 3D print jobs, and understanding 3D file formats. “We want this to be so simple that anyone can set up their own table-top factory.”center_img Microsoft continues to beat the drum as a technology company out to inspire and support 3D printing. After announcing earlier this year that it would be supporting 3D printing in Windows 8.1, Microsoft earlier this week took another step up when it announced the launch of its 3D Builder. © 2013 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Polarizationencryption based data storage in 3D Janus plasmonic helical nanoapertures

first_imgHelical plasmonic nanostructures have attracted considerable attention in materials science and chemistry due to their inherent optical chirality. In a new report, Yang Chen and a research team in the department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in the U.S. developed unique 3-D Janus (nanoparticles with two or more surface properties) plasmonic helical nanoapertures (helical holes), with direction-controlled polarization sensitivity. They engineered the helical structures using one-step grayscale focused ion beam milling (FIB). Chen et al. then encoded the Janus metasurface with two nanoaperture enantiomers (left and right handed mirror image molecules of each other) with specific rotational angles to demonstrate direction-controlled polarization data encryption for the first time. The scientists modeled the 3-D helical nanoapertures as a series of cascaded arc-shaped waveguide segments to achieve the expected optical chirality. If the handedness of the CPL (circularly polarized light) matched that of the gradient groove, the incoming optical power could be collected into the aperture area along the gradient groove to produce a strong transmission in the experimental setup. Chen et al. then determined the optical properties of the 3-D Janus plasmonic helical nanoaperture in the backward direction. For this, they illuminated the light into the silica substrate to transmit it out from the gold surface to obtain almost similar intensity in the backward direction, the results showed giant linear dichroism (not circular dichroism) with circularly polarized light. Citation: Polarization-encryption based data storage in 3-D Janus plasmonic helical nanoapertures (2019, June 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-polarization-encryption-based-storage-d-janus.html Optical properties of the 3D Janus plasmonic helical nanoaperture in the forward direction. (a) Simulated and (b) measured transmission spectra of the helical nanoaperture array in Form A for various incident/output handedness combinations in the forward direction, together with the corresponding CDTF spectra. (c) The measured transmission intensity as a function of the azimuthal angle α of the LP incident light at 830 nm. (d) Simulated and (e) measured reflection spectra and absorption spectra under RCP (right-handed circularly polarized) and LCP (left-handed circularly polarized) incidence in the forward direction. (f) Illustrations of the spin-dependent mode coupling processes inside the 3D helical nanoapertures in Form A and Form B, which can be considered as series of cascaded waveguide segments (WG n−1, WG n, WG n + 1,..). Circularly dichroic mode distributions are presented inside the waveguide segment WG n at 812 nm. (g) Electric field distributions 6 nm above the exit plane of the helical nanoaperture in Form A under RCP and LCP incidence at 812 nm. h Optical power flow distributions inside the helical nanoaperture in Form A under RCP and LCP incidence at 812 nm. Credit: Light: Science & Applications, doi: 10.1038/s41377-019-0156-8 , Nano Letters Explore further Journal information: Light: Science & Applications Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is typically used to analyze the chiroptics of two enantiomers, but chiroptical effects are extremely weak in natural materials. To overcome this challenge, scientists previously developed chiral plasmonic structures to significantly boost CD signals of chiral molecules. Aside from this purpose, such structures also have additional applications as miniature polarizers, nonlinear optics and spin-controlled optical devices. Helical plasmonic nanostructures are important since the electric field vector of circularly polarized light (CPL) can follow a helical trajectory. As a result, strong light matter interactions are expected when the handedness of helical nanostructures match that of CPL. However, it is challenging to fabricate such helical nanostructures in practice. Materials scientists have previously used two-photon direct laser writing followed by an electroplating step to produce a 3-D plasmonic helix, which had spatial resolution limits at the microscale during applications in the visible and near-IR spectrum. Similarly, focused electron/ion-beam induced deposition could scale the helical structure to the nanostructure, but the method lacked speed for large-scale production. As a consequence, lithography facilities with high-resolution alignment and delicate operations are presently required in order to conveniently and rapidly fabricate plasmonic helical nanostructures with giant CD signals. Direction-controlled polarization-encrypted data storage with the Janus metasurface. (a) A schematic diagram of the Janus metasurface for direction-controlled polarization-encrypted data storage. (Photograph used with permission: Niels Henrik David Bohr (1885–1962) Danish physicist. Quantum Theory. Nobel prize for physics 1922/Universal History Archive/UIG/Bridgeman Images.) (b) An illustration of the metasurface encoding process with the two nanoaperture enantiomers having specified rotation angles. (c) The normalized transmission intensity of LP light in the backward direction, which follows Malus’s law with respect to the angle θ between the incident polarization direction and the transmission axis of the 3D helical nanoaperture. (d) Captured transmission images of the Janus metasurface at 800 nm in both the forward and backward directions for various incident polarizations. Scale bar: 10 μm. Credit: Light: Science & Applications, doi: 10.1038/s41377-019-0156-8 Design and fabrication of 3D Janus plasmonic helical nanoapertures. (a) A schematic diagram of the 3D Janus plasmonic helical nanoaperture in two enantiomeric forms: Form A and Form B. The geometric parameters are p = 380 nm, r0 = 160 nm, r1 = 110 nm, θ = 90°, and H = 180 nm. For Form B in the bottom row, the depth of the gradient groove part increases along the red arrow, while the aperture part is indicated by the blue double-arrow. (b) An illustration of the grayscale focused ion beam milling method. (c) The experimentally obtained milling depth as a function of the applied ion dose. (d) Normalized ion dose distributions and SEM images of the fabricated 3D helical nanoapertures. The side-view images are captured with a visual angle of 52° to the surface normal. The red dashed arrows indicate the direction along which the groove depth increases. The scale bars are 200, 100, and 100 nm from left to right. Credit: Light: Science & Applications, doi: 10.1038/s41377-019-0156-8 Based on these results, Chen et al. encoded the Janus metasurface to construct a binary QR (quick response) code image in the forward direction under right-handed circularly polarized (RCP) illumination. In the second step, they encoded a grayscale image in the backward direction under linearly polarized light. They were able to encode information onto the same Janus metasurface without mutual disturbance and reveal the QR code image when only illuminating the right-handed light in the forward direction to decrypt and connect to an encoded message linking the Wikipedia site of the physicist Niels Bohr. Chen et al. tested the broadband performance of the Janus metasurface to distinguish the QR code image using a QR code scanner at 690 nm, ranging up to 890 nm.In this way, Chen et al. introduced a new type of 3-D Janus plasmonic nanoaperture using direction-switched polarization sensitivity. They fabricated the device using one-step grayscale FIB milling. The unique optical properties of the 3-D helical nanoapertures allowed them to encrypt and decrypt data using direction-controlled light polarization. The work will have additional, next-generation applications as multifunctional polarizers, high-resolution displays and in optical information processing. In the present work, Chen et al. etched the 3-D Janus plasmonic helical nanoapertures on a single, optically thick gold film with an arc shaped aperture and arc shaped gradient groove connected end-to-end with each other. Based on the depth of the gradient groove, which was increased either clockwise or counterclockwise, the chiral helical nanoapertures existed in two enantiomeric forms as versions “A’ and “B’ that were mirror symmetric to each other. The scientists applied a high dose of Ga+ ions during the process of focused ion beam milling and delicately adjusted the focus and astigmatism of the ion beam to form the 3-D helical nanoaperture arrays with satisfactory uniformity. They then studied the chiroptical properties of 3-D plasmonic helical nanoapertures in the forward direction, when the circularly polarized light (CPL) was illuminated onto the gold surface and transmitted out from the silica substrate within the experimental setup. The numerical simulation conducted with COMSOL Multiphysics and the experimental results of the study coincided with each other, and Chen et al. credited any experimental discrepancies to fabrication imperfections in the FIB system. More information: Yang Chen et al. 3-D Janus plasmonic helical nanoapertures for polarization-encrypted data storage, Light: Science & Applications (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41377-019-0156-8 William Thomson et al. Baltimore Lectures on Molecular Dynamics and the Wave Theory of Light, (2012). DOI: 10.1017/CBO9780511694523 Shengyan Yang et al. Spin-Selective Transmission in Chiral Folded Metasurfaces, Nano Letters (2019). DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.8b04521 Design and fabrication of 3D Janus plasmonic helical nanoapertures. Normalized ion dose distributions and SEM images of the fabricated 3D helical nanoapertures of form A and form B enantiomers. The side-view images are captured with a visual angle of 52° to the surface normal. The red dashed arrows indicate the direction along which the groove depth increases. The scale bars are 200, 100, and 100 nm from left to right. Credit: Light: Science & Applications, doi: 10.1038/s41377-019-0156-8 Broadband performance of the Janus metasurface. The images are captured under proper illumination conditions of direction and polarization at 690, 745, 800, 845, and 890 nm. Scale bar: 10 μm. Credit: Light: Science & Applications, doi: 10.1038/s41377-019-0156-8 The samples engineered in the work allowed the selective transmission of certain types of polarized light, while blocking others. This sensitivity to polarization depended on the direction of the incoming light; for instance, light in a specific direction prompted the arrays to produce binary images, whereas light in the opposite direction could reproduce grayscale photographs. Chen et al. envision using the proposed Janus helical nanoapertures for a variety of applications ranging from polarization control within built in photonic devices, advanced enantiomer sensing, data encryption and decryption as well as optical information processing. The new results are now published in Light: Science & Applications. Chirality was first defined by Lord Kelvin to describe any geometrical figure whose mirror image could not coincide with itself. The property is ubiquitous in biological objects that range from small biomolecules such as amino acids and nucleotides to larger macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids, and even our hands and feet. While the left-handed and right-handed versions of a molecule known as enantiomers can have similar chemical and physical properties, they can perform entirely different biological functions in diverse fields of applications. Synthesis of helical ladder polymers © 2019 Science X Network This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Deaths From Red Light Running At A 10Year Hig

first_imgDeaths From Red Light Running At A 10-Year High, AAA Study… by NPR News Bobby Allyn 8.29.19 6:02pm Deaths caused by motorists running red lights have risen to a 10-year high, a newly released study finds.At least two people are killed this way every day in the U.S., according to the study of government data by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.The study looked at fatalities from 2008 to 2017, the most recent year data are available. Drivers blowing through red lights killed 939 people in 2017. That’s an increase of 31% from a low in 2009, when 715 people were killed.More than half of those killed were passengers or people riding in other vehicles. About 35% were the drivers who ran the red light. Pedestrian and cyclist deaths connected to red light running represented about 5% of total deaths.The precise reason for the jump in fatalities isn’t clear. But AAA’s director of traffic safety advocacy and research, Jake Nelson, says distracted driving is likely a major contributor.”Drivers distracted on their phones, pedestrians distracted when crossing intersections, are all reasonable contributing causes to what we see the data telling us,” Nelson told NPR. “But it’s not the only cause.”For instance, AAA conducted a separate survey on red light running and found that about one-third of drivers who responded admitted to having sped through a red light in the past month, despite the majority of respondents saying red light running represents a serious safety concern.”So that implies that they weren’t distracted,” Nelson said.Another contributing factor is that more people are driving longer distances since 2008, according to AAA.”Ten years ago, we were recovering from an economic recession, and people were driving a lot less. So, pure exposure to more driving is going to result in increased crashes of all kinds,” Nelson said. “As a result of that, there will be more people who die in crashes involving red-light-running drivers.”AAA recommends putting red light cameras in areas that have a pattern of crashes, with local law enforcement officials directly supervising the cameras.”Camera enforcement is a proven way to reduce red light running and save lives,” said Jessica Cicchino of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.AAA says drivers should monitor “stale” green lights — those that have been green a long time as you approach the intersection. They are more likely to turn yellow as you arrive at the intersection.For pedestrians, making sure an intersection is clear before crossing is another thing that Nelson says might seem obvious.”If you’re the first person at a red light waiting to cross an intersection when the light turns green, give yourself three seconds,” he said. “It could mean the difference between life and death.”Pedestrians and cyclists should make eye contact with drivers, according to AAA, which also recommends not wearing headphones while commuting.”If you’re going to cross an intersection, for just a moment please take your face out of your phone and take those earbuds out of your years,” Nelson said, “so you can protect yourself in the event that someone blows through a red light.”Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit NPR. Helen H. Richardsonlast_img read more

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Immortalised in rock

first_imgArt is timeless. Its imprints can be found at any place at any point in time. The pictorial depiction of human-made markings on natural stone, popularly known as rock art, is the most ancient form of expression.These rock art images are a source of cultural communication between the past and the present.With a view to spread awareness and address the urgent need to preserve this art form, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts along with Ministry of Culture, Government of India, is organising an International conference on rock art 2012 along with an exhibition and workshops. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’‘The exhibition is an initiative which will help in understanding the roots of rock art and the journey since then, helping people to relate their theoretical knowledge with practical. India is fortunate in possessing one of the three largest concentrations of this world heritage. The conference is relevant with respect to research and learn and develop documentation programme of rock art,’ said Dipali Khanna, Member Secretary, Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts (IGNCA). Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe theme of the conference will centre on the following themes: concept and methodology, interpreting rock art, documentation and conservation amongst many.‘Experts and scholars from India, France, Italy, Spain, Indonesia, Douth Africa, Australia, Poland, USA, Cuba, Peru, Bolivia, China and many other countries will address the issue and challenges for preservation of rock art,’ added Khanna. Rock art festival will feature an exhibition of Indian and global rock art from to synthesise people about the unique nature of rock art. The exhibition partly will feature global rock art which will be divided in zones showing art forms of different continents. There are pieces rock arts related to pre-historic era ranging between 4,000 and 12,000 BC at display too.The Indian wing will also exhibit various tribal art forms that shows continuity of the tradition of rock art. The art forms will include Saura (Odisha), Warli (Maharashtra) and Rathwa (Gujarat). During the workshop, the rock art scholars and artists across the globe would demonstrate the journey of rock art, techniques and materials used for its depiction along with similarity and their differences in the art form across the countries.‘A cave like set up has been designed on the lines of Bhimbetka, an archaeological World Heritage site located in Raisen District in Madhya Pradesh to give a first hand experience and focus of the exhibition,’ said Khanna.DETAILAt: Indira Gandhi National Centre for Arts C.V Mess JanpathWhen: 7 December- 25 January Timings: 10 am to 7 pmlast_img read more

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Mouth watering delights

first_imgLooking out for something exotic for your dinner date this weekend? For a  ‘cow-boy styled’ dining rendezvous over delightful Tex-Mex cuisine head to Rodeo, Delhi’s first authentic Mexican-Italian cuisine restaurant. Rodeo’s executive chef Sanjay brings to your palate a complete new mouth-watering menu of authentic dishes. The wide array of non-vegetarian options features delectable offerings like the hot favorite- Enchiladas, an elegant adaptation of folded tortillas ;Barbacoa-marinated barbeque chicken; Pan PolloAsado -Pan pollo chicken; Coredeo En Cazuela-tender lamb simmered in aromatic spices, chilies and red wine to name a few. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’For all the ardent vegetarians, the menu offers a variety of Masha Dishes, Tortillas such as Tortilla Aztec- an oven dish made with cheese , corn , herbs and your choice of stuffing in chef special sauce and much more. Compliment your food with a variety of cocktails, mocktails, and many such interesting drinks.  Tease your sweet tooth with the lip-smacking  Mexican style brownie  topped with vanilla ice cream, plenty of home-made hot fudge sauce and nuts.So, get ready for a culinary voyage over a unique Tex-Mex experience with friends or family.last_img read more

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Desires revealed in nine parts on Delhi stage

first_imgWhat is the meaning of the word ‘liberation’? Its connotations are several, open to all kinds of interpretations from men and women of all colours and creeds. Is there a ‘real picture’ of liberation? Can it ever mean one thing, and isn’t the fuzziness of meaning a liberating facet of the word itself? That is the answer that Ishwar Shunya in his play, Nine Parts of Desire, tries to seek. Shunya says the play, which is making its debut in the Capital and is directed by Kanchan Ujjal Singh, is an attempt to find a catharsis for the lack of female agency in today’s world. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’‘The play is based on nine stories of nine Iraqi women post or during the Gulf War. The play embodies the argument of what liberation means for each of the women. Inspired by the work of Geraldine Brooks and Heather Raffo, it is a portrait of the extraordinary (and ordinary) lives of Iraqi women – a sexually alluring painter, a radical Communist, doctors, exiles, wives and lovers. It portrays the many conflicting aspects of what it means to be a woman in a country overshadowed by war,’ says Shunya. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe nine monologues span through different situations, varied sufferings, both imaginary and real, of the nine characters. It further explores love, life, desires, wishes and whims seen from the women’s perspective. ‘One of the nine characters is an innocent child who lives her strife-ridden life in the war-struck Iraq. There is lament for how American forces, under the garb of welfare, have only carried out vested interests for their own countrymen,’ he added.last_img read more

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A weighty Grain

first_imgWhile the musician was in Delhi for a performance at The Aquarium Lounge, we got a chance to talk to him. Read on…Before we get into your solo projects, I must bring up Midivil Punditz. Describe to us the journey Indian electronica music has taken ever since you began making music? Midival Punditz has been Tapan and my main project for the last 15 years and we have come a long way from being Dj’s in Delhi night clubs, to making our own music and releasing 3 studio albums till yet. We started making electronica when it was just starting out in the west. This actually gave us a pretty open palette to do anything we wished to in India. So, we kinda decided to do the most honest style that came to us. We did not realise at that time that it would be called Asian Electronica eventually. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’You are coming out with an album called Grey to Silver, where you have collaborated with Karsh Kale. Is there an underlying theme behind this album? What inspired you to create it? Describe that moment to us.The Grain project came about, out of my personal desire to write songs and vocal tracks. I have wanted to do song-writing for a long time now, and it was with Karsh that i started experimenting with it. I wrote the first couple of tracks with Karsh and then with Talia Bentson, and that was a realisation into the style i wanted for Grain. I think it was after I wrote It’s All Right with Karsh that the entire sound emerged for me. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixWhat is the stuff that you grew up listening to? Tell us a little bit about your key musical influences?Like any other kid born in the 70’s, I grew up listening to 80s music, and then Classic Rock. It was not until the 90’s that i started listening to the Electronica artists like Prodigy, Chemical Brothers, Fat Boy Slim, Apollo 400, etc. My musical influences have been a mix of all these, from Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, to Michael Jackson and Prodigy. Daft Punk’s Thomas Bangalter, in an interview said, ‘Today, electronic music is like an audio energy drink. Artists are overcompensating with this aggressive, energetic, hyper-stimulating music – it’s like someone shaking you. But it can’t move people on an emotional level.’ Do you agree?I agree with Thomas’ introspection on the electronica production these days. It has become pretty aggressive and loud. However, there is also a lot of good emotional and well written electronica out there.What suggestion/advice would you have for newbies in this field?Make ‘honest’ music. Please speak the truth and that will make you successful and also make the audience feel your music.last_img read more

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India through the lenses

first_imgColours of India,a photography exhibition is being organised in the Capital by Delhi Photography Club. Picture clicked by Kaynat Kazi will  be displayed at the show. From colorful block prints, Mughal crafts to blue pottery and meenakari, this show is more than a story. It’s a narration of some of the rare arts getting even rarer each passing day and much more.  The rani pink of mystical Rajasthan; the pastel hues of southern India; the joyous, bright hues of the northern frontier; and the bright colors of the east offer a kaleidoscopic insight into an almost perfect blend of India’s history and modernism. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The artiste, Kazi is an avid photographer who loves travelling to unfrequented places – from the heights of Ladakh, villages of Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan and Maharashtra – and captures diverse cultures that usually escape the regular eye. Her interest lies in capturing female expressions and candid photography. She believes that the moment the subject is conscious of being clicked, the original element is lost.When: On till 15 JulyWhere: Open Palm Court Gallery, India Habitat Centre, Lodhi RoadTiming: 11 am to 7 pmlast_img read more

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